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  • R4330 Snipe Question

    Just got this today at the Depot. FYI $324 here in IL. Original $399. They have some deal if you spend $300, you get an instant $75 off.

    Anyways, my question is what is an acceptable amount of snipe?
    I adjusted the tables using the "penny" method that I read on here. I still have snipe I can see and feel but I admit it's very little. I measured it to be less than .01 Ok that seems very low but I will need to sand.

    Is that ok as far as planers go? Is that GOOD as far as planers go?

    One more question. I read once about feeding a piece crooked into the planer and I can't remember why. Any help?
    Thanks in advance!
    RJ

  • #2
    Re: R4330 Snipe Question

    HI
    Most planer snipe occurs because of poor outfeed support. I have a 5' outfeed table for my planner and experience no snipe. Also applying some upward pressure on the outfeed side could help. .01 is a very small amount of snipe I do admit. Feeding stock at an angle will possibly reduce chatter, but that is primarly done on widebelt sanders. Hope this helps.

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    • #3
      Re: R4330 Snipe Question

      I set my tables perfectly level and make my final pass at 1/32" and have no snipe. It only appears to snipe badly when taking over 1/16" in my experience.
      I do run my boards through slightly skewed because I'm under the impression that doing so will cause more even wear on the blades. Maybe so, maybe not, but it can't hurt.
      Do like you always do,,,,,,Get what you always get!!

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      • #4
        Re: R4330 Snipe Question

        I did find that it does help to take a final "cleaning pass" at the end. I would have to agree on the wear part too, it would make sense.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: R4330 Snipe Question

          I've never been able to get rid of the snipe completely, but then I've never had the gumption to build an indeed/outfeed setup, either.

          (Fine Woodworking had a great article once about an infeed/outfeed table that extended THROUGH the planer, eliminating 3/4" of maximum planing thickness but providing nearly perfect stock support. Looked pretty cool, but at 7' or 8' long, it appeared to kinda invalidate the whole purpose of having a portable planer in the first place.)

          Instead, I simply waste the first and last 3 or 4 inches. As a cabinetmaker I typically by rough planed 13/16" lumber with rough ends, and there's usually some checking in the board ends. So, by wasting the ends AFTER planing I'm a.) getting rid of the snipe, and b.) getting rid of the drying checks.

          If you're a furniture maker this post might be worth dirt for you, but I hope it might otherwise help.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: R4330 Snipe Question

            Originally posted by tulsafinecabinetry View Post
            , but at 7' or 8' long, it appeared to kinda invalidate the whole purpose of having a portable planer in the first place.
            I can't see doing this unless it was removable. Do you remember?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: R4330 Snipe Question

              Originally posted by tulsafinecabinetry View Post
              (Fine Woodworking had a great article once about an infeed/outfeed table that extended THROUGH the planer, eliminating 3/4" of maximum planing thickness but providing nearly perfect stock support. Looked pretty cool, but at 7' or 8' long, it appeared to kinda invalidate the whole purpose of having a portable planer in the first place.)
              I think I read the same article. If so, then it was a sled that went through the planer, and it had a way to stabilize warped and twisted wood so that you could plain it down flat. You would put the board on the sled, and then there were a series of shims that you used to keep the board from moving. After planing one face flat, you caould turn it over and plane the other face flat. It looked like a great idea, but I've never made it. I think I may still have the article.

              A-HA! Here's the article:
              Flatten Boards without a Jointer

              On the other hand, if this isn't the same article, then I'm just blowing smoke .
              De Colores,
              Dow
              Boerne, TX

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: R4330 Snipe Question

                I just read an article from woodsmith mag that suggested using scrap at begining and end of the piece you feed through to eliminate snipe where it matters. I can see this to be mostly important when working with more expesive rough stock.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: R4330 Snipe Question

                  Sometimes I get snipe, sometimes I don't and I have only a vague idea why. Feeding additional stock behind the good one helps but it still is a waste in some cases.

                  Before planing rough wood I dimension it and I try to plane wood such that the snipe occurs at rough, cracked, split, angled or otherwise undesirable ends that I will discard anyway. Also, (as an example) if I need two lengths of 24 inches I will first dimension and plane a board that is 52 or so inches long and then I'll cut it in half. That way I end up with a snipe on only one end of the resulting boards and my loss is about just over 2 inches per piece. I consider this waste negligible and something of a calculated risk, if you will, that will happen anyway when I'm ready to square the final pieces.

                  On occasion, I won't worry about snipe at all if it fits just about right into my design. For instance, when using mortise and tenon joinery I don't care about snipe one bit, since one, or both ends of the stock will be shaped into a tenon anyway, and thus the snipe will be a non issue.
                  In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: R4330 Snipe Question

                    I get snipe on my new 4330 ridgid planer. I always got snipe on my old 15" delta. I just got in the habit of planing my boards 5"-6" longer than needed. This works well since I used to purchase all my lumber in the rough so I had to trim the ends anyway. It's just the nature of the beast.

                    Even if you can't feel the snipe, if you look at it with the light at an angle, you may see it or it will show up after finishing. Been there done that.

                    Red
                    Red

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: R4330 Snipe Question

                      Originally posted by rjm78 View Post
                      One more question. I read once about feeding a piece crooked into the planer and I can't remember why. Any help?
                      Thanks in advance!
                      RJ
                      The reason for feeding the material at an angle is, if snipe does occur, it will only appear in a corner of the wood instead of across the entire piece. I always precut at a bit longer length so I can final size the piece after planning.
                      If at first you don't succeed, try reading the owners manual.

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                      • #12
                        Re: R4330 Snipe Question

                        actually I think it has more to do with getting more even wear on the blades, but I could be wrong.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: R4330 Snipe Question

                          I think I'm getting better and the trick to it (IMO) the penny set up on here, shallow final cuts, always at an angle and alternating.

                          So far, so good.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: R4330 Snipe Question

                            There are really two main reasons for feeding the board at an angle. The first is that the blades get a better bite when you are at an angle to the grain. It's the same effect as when you hand plane a board - the plane iron usually bites much better when you hold it at a slight shearing angle to the long grain because the edge of the blade is biting into each fiber one at a time rather than all at once. As anyone that has planed a board with a hand plane knows, it's much easier and smoother to plane at an angle -- the plane bites much easier, with less down pressure required to start the cut. These little planer blades are pricey and don't last long so you definitely want to make their life as easy as possible.

                            The second reason is to wear the blades evenly.

                            A side benefit is that if you have a nick in your blades and haven't shifted them, the "stripe" runs diagonally and off of your board rather than along the full length. Less to scrape or sand off later.

                            As for snipe, with my planer (Delta 13") I agree with Mcalpine. It's mostly all about support of the board. As the board is entering the planer or leaving it, there's a certain length where it is held down by only one roller. It either hasn't engaged the second roller and is totally held down to the table by the first roller (leading edge snipe) or has left the first roller and is completely being held down by the second roller (trailing edge snipe). The problem is often worse the longer/heavier the stock is. The little fold down tables on these small planers are just not very ridgid, so as the center of gravity of your board gets far away from the rollers, the force on the rollers increases. As the board is either entering or leaving the planer, the little table deflects a bit. Then, when the end of the board is only being held by one roller, the board essentially pivots up into the cutterhead. The result is a snipe.

                            I use roller stands on infeed and outfeed but they generally aren't good enough. So I also just grab the board and support it for the first foot or so going in and then walk around the planer and support it coming out. This helps almost all the time. I'm too cheap to cutoff the sniped ends or expensive hardwood if I can help it, so in my view the only acceptable level of snipe is no snipe. Can't get it all the time, but a little manual support definitely helps.

                            Short sleeves, no wrist watch or rings, or anything else that can snag on your board, please.

                            Good luck,

                            -Andy

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