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What type of wood for what type of blade?

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  • What type of wood for what type of blade?

    I have reviewed several posts in this forum on table saw blades and many mentions go out to dedicated blades,(I pressume 3 is the magic number). But what type of blade do you use for hardwood, softwood, plywood, melamine, etc. is there a general rule of thumb? I use a woodtek 2 hp 10" table saw.
    Measure twice...Cut once..I always forget that one!

  • #2
    Freud has a neat tool for suggesting blades based on your equipment and the type of work you will be doing
    Freud Blade chooser

    I cut hardwood and softwood with the same blades
    I have a 24 tooth for ripping and an 80 tooth for crosscut, I have others but these are the main workhorses. The 80 tooth Freud I have also does a nice job on plywood. I try to stay away from laminate but if I have to cut a piece I tape the cut line then score the cut with a knife and use my trusty freud 80 tooth. I think the model is a TK-80 but most of the printing has rubbed off from use

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    • #3
      WBROOKS:
      Thanks for the link I checked out several blades and then came across a deal that frued has three blades in a set for around $150. I think I will pick up the set and try all dedicated frued blades to start with.
      Measure twice...Cut once..I always forget that one!

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      • #4
        I think Freud offers a 3 blade combo that should cover it all....rip, fine crosscut, and general purpose. All are good blades and the package is a good value @ ~ $150 if I recall. (Amazon or Price Cutter might have it)

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        • #5
          If I understand this correctly a rip blade is used for ripping hard or soft wood with the grain (or does it matter), a cross cut blade would be used to cut accross the grain of any type of wood?? (not sure on that) and a fine tooth blade would be used for melamine, MDF and what else?? I wnat to use the right blade for the job, I don't care if I have to change my blades often or not, besides its a hobby, tinkering with my setup is half the fun.
          Measure twice...Cut once..I always forget that one!

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          • #6
            You have it now.
            Ripping is defined as cutting with the grain,
            Crosscut - across the grain, in hard or soft wood.
            The fine tooth blade would be for any coated stock like melamine, plywood used for furnature(don't want chip out). I would not use it for MDF because that stuff dulls blades faster than just about any other materal and cuts well with just about any blade (perhaps use the blade that came with the saw for MDF). You can also use a fine tooth blade for cutting plastic (acrillic, plexi, lexan)

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            • #7
              I was using my original blade for the MDF I was cutting, but it was a pretty ugly cut when it was all done. So I wnet to a finer tooth dewalt blade that didn;t last very long. I am going to be ripping 4X8 sheeets of MDF into 4" strips to make my own base molding, on my router, any recommendation on how to get a clean cut in the MDF?
              Measure twice...Cut once..I always forget that one!

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              • #8
                Try the Tenryu "Gold Medal" blade. It uses a 40 tooth, 20 degree rake ATB blade (C4 carbide) on a hand tensioned blade.

                They also make a melamine blade (100 teeth), but if you are only cutting MDF, you probably don't need the extra teeth.

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                • #9
                  For those of you who are fans of the Forrest Woodworker II blades, Silvers Mill has them on sale for $85.75 plus $8.55 shipping.

                  http://www.sliversmill.com

                  I have no connection with this company, just stumbled across a good deal on the blade Fine Woodworking rated #1 combination blade, the model WW10407100.

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