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TS3612 220 volt conversion

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  • TS3612 220 volt conversion

    I am trying to switch my new TS 3612 over to 220 volt operation. I have a new 220 line that tests out with 120 volts on each leg all the way to the motor power cord. I have carefully switched the motor leads per the manual. I have rechecked this step several times. If I check for resistance thru the motor, I get about 25-30 ohms on each leg at the motor power cord plug. When I try to operate the motor it is completely dead. Nothing. I feel like there ought to be something obvious here but I can't find it. Can anyone help? BTW, the saw runs fine on 110.

  • #2
    I would check the voltage across the whole circut, not just each leg. There was a guy here in the office that converted his saw to 220V and could not get it to run. After trying several motors, he checked his circuit as you did and found 110v on each leg, but it turned out the the brand new breaker he installed was bad, and basicly he had two 110v circuts, not a 220v as he had intended. If you have this checked and it still doesn't work, call 1-800-4RIDGID.

    Jake

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    • #3
      Thanks for the thoughts, Jake. You helped me. I knew it was simple. I mistakenly bought a mini breaker, not a double pole breaker. I realized after your post that my breaker has no connecting bar between the toggles, hence no double pole!! I do have 110 on each leg but nothing together. BTW I also purchased a DP1550 with the saw - like 'em both. Cost vs value I don't see how you can beat Ridgid. One other note - I must be lucky 'cause the HD near me is OK; pretty well stocked and a few knowledgable people. If they don't know the're at least polite about it. Displays are poor though. Thanks again for the help. Gotta go make sawdust.
      John

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      • #4
        You were probably on the same leg with both circuits. It's not the trip bar that makes it happen, it's having two different 110 circuits I believe.

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        • #5
          It is the two different "legs" that give you 220 Volts. The electricity is generated with 3 "legs" each of which are 120 degrees out of phase. Standard residential electrical usually supplies two of these legs. If you look in the circuit breaker panel, you will notice that there are two different bars. Each bar connects to a different phase. The problem with the "mini" breaker was that both circuits were connected to the same leg. Look carefully at the double pole breakers and you will see that they are designed to connect to the two different bars. A little 60-30-90 triangle math to calculates the resultant magnitude (of two legs 120 degrees out of phase) will give you your 120 * sqrt(3) = 220 (207 actually)
          Mark

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          • #6
            Three phase power in a Wye connection can have 120 volts between each of the three legs and ground, or 208 volts between any two of the "hot" legs.

            But residential circuits are single phase, not three phase, with the ground/return "in the middle." Thus if you have 120 volts on an individual circuit, you should have 240 volts across both, not 208 volts (or 110/220).

            On a purely theoretical basis, a motor has no starting torque with single phase power. So there are some electrical and magnetic tricks to get the single phase motor started (starting capacitors, shaded poles, etc.). The three phase power is especially good where there are large motors, since that does allow a motor to have a starting torque. But three phase power is not distributed in residential areas in the US.

            Incidentally if you only used the 208 volt legs of a three phase circuit you would still only be using a single phase at the motor.

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            • #7
              Thanks to all that replied to my post. Maybe this will be of help to some other amateur electricians out there. Incidentally, I did install a double pole breaker in the panel in the shop - still no 240v power. Went downstairs and started looking at the main panel and guess what? I have a typical 200 amp service panel that uses thin breakers (GE). A double pole breaker can be installed so that it either pulls power from one leg or by shifting it one space it will pull from both legs. Voila! 240 volt power in the shop.
              John

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              • #8
                That’s interesting Charlie, I didn't know that. I was just relying on my basic electic power course in college. I was in Computer Engineering though so power electricity was neither my interest nor a strong point. However, thinking about what you said makes sense. If every house was only connected to 2 phases of a 3-phase supply, that would be a big unbalanced load. I suspect it would be compounded by that fact that most of our (residential) power use would be on a single phase (120V).
                Mark

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