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  • Torsion Box

    How important is it to have a dead flat surface to build things like cabinets, bookcases, and blanket chests? Does it make squaring things up any easier? I'm looking to build these types of things to improve my limited skills and wonder whether the effort to build flat assembly table is worth it. I saw a guy build one on TV and I've seen the recent foldable I-beam table in ShopNotes. If I am reasonably careful and accurate with my cuts and squaring process, how flat does my assembly area need to be?

  • #2
    Re: Torsion Box

    I don't have one and have made many pieces of furniture. If I need a table two saw horses and a sheet of OSB of MDF work fine as an assembly table, what ever is handy. If you need a flat hard surface sweep a patch of garage floor.

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    • #3
      Re: Torsion Box

      Originally posted by wbrooks View Post
      I don't have one and have made many pieces of furniture. If I need a table two saw horses and a sheet of OSB of MDF work fine as an assembly table, what ever is handy. If you need a flat hard surface sweep a patch of garage floor.
      And unless you are extremely lucky, that isn't too flat either!

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      • #4
        Re: Torsion Box

        Thing is where you install(what ever you make) probably will not be flat either.
        I install kitchens and have to scribe,shim and cut to get things level and flat

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        • #5
          Re: Torsion Box

          A torsion box assembly table is a high priority on my "to do list"...
          I've already researched the subject and this is part of what I've found ->

          David Marks did a great episode (Woodworks season 4 episode #409) on this but I couldn't find a link to the vid. (hint... search torrents)

          However I did find his description and directions ->
          http://www.djmarks.com/stories/djm/T...able_94697.asp

          I also found this informative vid from the Wood Whisperer ->
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-Hbsou6cWo

          (double click if vid doesn't play)

          HTH

          edit: another link to the Wood whisperer article ->
          http://thewoodwhisperer.com/episode-...e-torsion-box/

          http://thewoodwhisperer.com/episode-...y-table-stand/
          Last edited by jbergstrom; 07-25-2009, 06:31 PM.
          Cheers! - Jim
          -------------
          All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

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          • #6
            Re: Torsion Box

            Those are really good references. I especially appreciate the video link. Given the myriad imperfections we face, why do you feel a torsion box is important? Do you consider it an essential tool or more of a professional enhancement?

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            • #7
              Re: Torsion Box

              Originally posted by masww1 View Post
              Those are really good references. I especially appreciate the video link. Given the myriad imperfections we face, why do you feel a torsion box is important? Do you consider it an essential tool or more of a professional enhancement?
              I would like a torsion box assembly table in my shop so I can have a perfectly flat surface to reference from and to aid in assembly. It is also dimensionally stable throughout the seasons (Pacific northwest).

              I don't believe it is essential but if you start out with a quality surface (dead flat and level) it can only help whatever project you're assembling. I'm going to leave a generous overhang on all edges of mine to facilitate clamping. This will be great for making sure carcasses, panels etc. are glued up square and flat.
              Cheers! - Jim
              -------------
              All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

              Comment

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