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How cut 33" plywood on granite-top saw

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  • How cut 33" plywood on granite-top saw

    I got the saw without thinking about my cross-cuts. My radial saw is broken, and I would rather make my 33" cuts in a single cut anyway (without flipping the board). This saw cuts a maximum 30 1/2". The end piece for a 36" cabinet on a 3 1/2" kick is 32 1/4". The dividers are 31". Just don't try to make cabinets with this saw?

  • #2
    Re: How cut 33" plywood on granite-top saw

    I shift the fence rails on my ts-3650 to the right for more capacity can you shift yours? Pat

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    • #3
      Re: How cut 33" plywood on granite-top saw

      I have also heard of people shifting over a bolt hole to gain extra cutting capacity, as many like myself don't ever move the fence to the left side of the blade. This should give you an extra 8 inches to the right of the blade.

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      • #4
        Re: How cut 33" plywood on granite-top saw

        Get a helper and make the cut with the 33" dimension on the LH side of the blade.
        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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        • #5
          Re: How cut 33" plywood on granite-top saw

          1. remove the fence

          2. clamp a straitedge on the underside of the material that needs to be cut. the straightedge should be clamped so it rides on the exposed edge of the left side extension table.

          3. start saw and make cut carefully, exercising all necessary anti-kickback precautions.

          4. for example, if the distance from the right side of the blade to the exposed edge of the left side extension table is 15", the straightedge would be clamped 48 1/8" from the right edge of the material (the good, kept, side) assuming a 60" piece of material and you want to cut off a 33" piece (33+15+1/8).

          5. in short, use the exposed edge of the left side extension table as a "fence". just be certain that the exposed edge is parallel to the blade and that the straightedge is perfectly straight.
          there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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          • #6
            Re: How cut 33" plywood on granite-top saw

            I agree with Finer, I needed to cut a 45* at the end of an 4x8 sheet of plywood I screwed a stright edge into the ply and slid on the edge of the tablesaw top. Worked out really well.

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            • #7
              Re: How cut 33" plywood on granite-top saw

              i just reviewed a photo of the 4511 and it doesn't have an exposed left side extension wing like the 3660. but there should be enough room between the top of the rails and the top of the wings to attach a 1/2" straight edge, so the technique should still be applicable.
              there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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              • #8
                Re: How cut 33" plywood on granite-top saw

                You can carefully set up to take your finished piece off the left side of the blade as previously suggested, and this is probably the way to go for one or two pieces. But if you have to make a lot of cabinets, I generally feel that the best and most consistent cuts come from getting your finished dimension between the blade and the fence, rather than using the "offcut". You should be able to modify your fence rail mounting. However much you shift things to the right, you lose that much on the other side. Fortunately you probably don't need to use the other side all that much. I have a TS3650, which has 36" rip (actually a bit more) which was a fairly big reason I chose that saw in the first place.

                Before that, I had a 20 year old saw (grizzly) with insufficient rip capacity, even with the fence rails shifted. I added a Beismeyer to to solve the problem. The older grizzly fence was pure junk, anyway.

                Before that, a plywood blade in a portable circ saw with a clamped on straightedge worked for me. The edge you get isn't near good enough for cabinet or furniture, so I would then clamp the straightedge again and run a router to get a perfectly clean edge. I still do this for really big pieces of ply. It works, but takes time to get the straightedge aligned so things end up perfectly square. Having enough capacity on the tablesaw makes the job so much faster and easier.

                I'm curious about your design, though. In these parts, a 36" cabinet is normally 36" to the top surface of the countertop. I always allow 1-1/2 for the countertop thickness. If you cut the kick into the sidepanel, this says your sides will be 34-1/2. If you're mounting your cabinet boxes on a separate 3-1/2 pedestal to get your kick, then the sides will be 31. How do you come up with 32-1/4 sides?? Also, I build my cabinet dividers so they set into either 1/4 or 3/8 deep dadoes in the 3/4 ply cabinet bottom (often the ply is only 0.700 to 0.720 thick, so I adjust dado depth accordingly). So, for a 36" carcass with a 3-1/2 kick, the divider would be somewhere around 30-1/2 to 30-5/8 if you set the bottom panel flush to the bottom of the face frame. I usually do just the opposite, though, preferring to make the bottom panel flush with the inside edge of the face frame. So the dividers end up being even shorter. I like the look and it saves a little plywood. Just curious about your numbers, as I always like to see what I can learn from other people's methods. This only matters to you because if you relocate your fence rails, you need to make sure that you get enough out of the relocation to do your job.

                My normal approach, btw, is to cut the sides to 35-1/4, and increase the kick to 4.25. This is because I generally install cabinets before the flooring goes in, and I allow a total of 3/4 for the tile backer, thinset and tile. If the tile install will use a mudbed, I allow even more (i.e., make the cabinets taller still) because the mud bed should be at least an inch thick. By making the cabinets taller, I get the countertop pretty close to 36" above the finished floor with a 3-1/2 kick as measured from the tile.

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                • #9
                  Re: How cut 33" plywood on granite-top saw

                  How about building a cross cut sled. Then you can cut any length that will fit between your walls. If you build it deep enough, say to handle 24" wide stock, then you can cross cut your cabinet sides to whatever length they need to be.

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                  • #10
                    Re: How cut 33" plywood on granite-top saw

                    Seconded. Either build a cross cut sled or maybe even use a skilsaw with a fine toothed blade and a straight edge on a couple of sawhorses. Or clamp a straightedge to the bottom and use the table saw.

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                    • #11
                      Re: How cut 33" plywood on granite-top saw

                      There will be always situations when your TS with the rip capacity just short of that 1".
                      I second the seconded post (do I "third" it?). Circular saw with a strait edge guide. In fact I got one of those for the precious few situation that my 3650 (37" rip capacity) can't handle.
                      In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

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