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BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

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  • BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

    I'm in the process of setting up a BS14002 that I bought yesterday. I noticed during the process of squaring the table to the blade that the table tilts down slightly at the back. In other words, as I'm feeding the stock it is going down hill just a tad. This would have no effect on the quality of the cut, but I just wondered if I need to shim up the trunion on to get the table square in both directions. Doesn't mention anything about this in the manual, but it seems odd.

    Everything else seems to have gone well, and I have made some test cuts. I have the vibration that everyone talks about in other posts on this saw. I've already chucked the rubber motor mounts and hard mounted the motor to a piece of 3/4" MDF as others have suggested. I'll probably get a better belt, tires, and blade over the next few weeks as seems mandatory with this saw. If I still have the vibration after that I'll try to balance the wheels with stick on weights. The vibration is'nt really as bad as some have made it sound. In any case, at $175 for a reconditioned saw, I can spend a few bucks to tune it up.

  • #2
    Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

    you might check out the october, 2006 issue of wood magazine. it profiles the noted furniture maker michael fortune. he has several band saws, from the ridgid 1400 to general international saws retailing for $1000. the article covers his tune up procedures for the 1400 and discusses band saw techniques. its well worth the read, especially if you have a 1400. just my $0.02. also, one of the major causes of band saw vibration is non-planarity of the lower wheel and the drive pulley. to the extent the lower wheel and the drive pulley (attached to the motor) are not in the same plane, the belt torques the lower wheel, causing it to rotate slightly out of its rotational plane, thereby causing vibration.
    Last edited by FINER9998; 08-16-2009, 10:26 AM.
    there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

      Originally posted by FINER9998 View Post
      you might check out the october, 2006 issue of wood magazine.
      Thank you. I'll see about getting that issue and read the article.

      One other issue I have been trying to address is the lack of a fence. I've seen other posts that recommend Kreg's bandsaw fence (good tools - I own several of their products). Their website doesn't show Ridgid's bandsaw as being compatible. Can anyone confirm this or tell me what they have done to mount a Kreg fence.

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      • #4
        Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

        i've no experience with kregg fences, but wood magazine had a shop tip for a limited use bandsaw fence. they clamped a large speed square to a BS table top with the distance from blade to speed square edge equal to the rip cut. the heel of the speed square is rested against the table edge perpendicular to the blade. looked like it would work well.
        there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

          Originally posted by BobMcCormick View Post
          Thank you. I'll see about getting that issue and read the article.

          One other issue I have been trying to address is the lack of a fence. I've seen other posts that recommend Kreg's bandsaw fence (good tools - I own several of their products). Their website doesn't show Ridgid's bandsaw as being compatible. Can anyone confirm this or tell me what they have done to mount a Kreg fence.

          I have the Jet brand fence on my BS1400, grey model, perfect fit, no mods, so if they list a Jet, then that would fit. The Kreg is a good fence. The speed square idea I have not tried but for re-sawing I can not see how that would work as you want a tall fence.
          The BS 1400 is an OK saw. It needs many some mods. Reinforce the stand base[plywood], make sure the wheels are coplanar and balanced, the pulleys in a plane 90 deg. to the motor shaft and are not bent[cast or machined best], a link belt helps a lot [you can make the motor mount position move, so you can full open lower door], roller guides[HFT] for resawing and cool blocks for thinner blades, timberwolf or olsen blades[stock blade is terrible], urethane tires and a 4" DC gate[Rockler],I also added thick Automotive rubber bushings on the motor mount.
          There are better options such as the Orion/Sears 14" saw. I paid $200 for a floor model years ago and for that price it is OK. I do not use it much .If I did I would buy another saw. I prefer my 10" sears/Rikon for smaller use.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

            Originally posted by Andrew M. View Post
            I have the Jet brand fence on my BS1400, grey model, perfect fit, no mods, so if they list a Jet, then that would fit.
            Thanks for that information. I'm going to fire off an email to Kreg Tool and see what they recommend, just to be sure. I would still like to hear from any other forum members, if they have used the Kreg bandsaw fence on their BS1400

            In regard to my original question about squaring the table in both directions, I found a video on setting up a bandsaw on the Wood Magazine website that suggested doing so by shimming up the trunion until the rear of the blade was square with the table.

            I did buy a Power-Plus link belt this week and installed it last night. I didn't see much change in the vibration issue. I'll try balancing the wheels next.

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            • #7
              Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

              Originally posted by BobMcCormick View Post
              I'm going to fire off an email to Kreg Tool and see what they recommend, just to be sure.
              As a follow up, I did contact Kreg and their reply was that their fence will fit the BS1400 without any modifications.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment & Vibration

                I purchased a BS 14002 at Home Depot's Ridgid 20% off sale a couple of weeks ago. I set up all areas of the saw per instructions in the Ridgid assembly manual and from Woodworker Magazine. The table adjustment went very well and square was easily obtained after just 2 adjustments and one washer added to the trunnion bolt.

                However, vibration was still an issue. So, I visited BB and replaced the V-belt with a 1/2" power twist link belt. After installation, almost 70% of the vibes disappeared. Excellent!

                Upon closer inspection of the upper and lower wheels, I found the wheels were both drilled out on their reverse. Drilled spots exist opposite the machine stamps on each wheel. A free spin of each wheel (blade removed, tension released, & tires on) sees them stop at exactly the same heavy spot each time; right at the wheel's factory drilled areas.

                Question: Before proceeding to buy urethane tires or attempt balancing the wheels with further drilling, should I remove the rubber tires and re-inspect each wheel's balance?

                edmontonian

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

                  Hi ed..., I had the same issue but the wheels weren't even drilled at the correct place. I don't think that having the tires on it is much of an issue. Mine, on the other hand, wouldn't stay on so I bought some polyurethane tires and it just so happened that I installed them before drilling. I drilled somewhere in the neighborhood of 8 holes, most of which were 3/16". Good luck.
                  Later,
                  Chiz

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

                    Hi ironhat,

                    The Ridgid assembly instructions omit mentioning how tight to torque the bolts through the rubber motor mount bushings. Can you give me some idea on the torque these bolts need?

                    Tonite I will try to balance the wheels with the tires on. As things now stand, the saw shakes about 1/2 inch between the motor and the saw at both start-up and shut-down. I can't imagine why it shakes so hard.

                    Last night I saw a You Tube review of this saw by its owner. Not quite like the lead of the video, I added a 3/4" mdf board to the centre section of the saw stand. I screwed and glued it down with some PL adhesive. It really did not help reduce any vibes. However, I now have a shelf to make bandsaw "things" store-able and close at hand.

                    Tonite, I am removing the motor from the base to add an mdf mount plate in hopes of further vibration reduction. Torque specs for the bolts would be helpful. I purchased longer M8x1.25 bolts to compensate for the mdf thickness being added. These have the same thread as the OEM's.

                    Who knows? Urethane tires may be the next item going into this saw.

                    I'll post on the forum when I get done with tweaking.


                    edmontonian

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

                      Hi All,

                      Obtaining Coplanar-
                      Since the last post, I have shimmed and balanced the wheels on my BS14002, orange. It took 5 Home Depot 1/64" shims on the lower wheel to obtain coplanar alignment. The lower wheel's 12 millimeter bolt is reverse threaded, so be sure to crank clockwise if you attempt removal.

                      Balancing Wheels-
                      Upper wheel: The blade was removed from the saw. The wheel was spun. The heavy side of the wheel was found to be exactly opposite of the factory balancing attempt. I think the drilling dimples removed from the wheel's reverse at the factory could have remained in place.
                      Moving on- At Canadian Tire, I purchased a 10 pack of Daniellson 1/8 ounce lead egg weights from the fishing isle. These were flattened with pliers and each one was placed on a 3 inch piece of painters tape.
                      The balance process involved going just off centre (about 5 to 10 degrees) of the opposite (heavy) point on the wheel. The tape held the flattened weights to the wheels and a good balance was found in about one hour. With 7 weights placed, Automotive GOOP adhered them to the wheels, and the tape holding them stayed until the adhesive dried. Should this GOOP eventually fail, I will use epoxy. The lower wheel needed only 3 weights using the same process. Again, the balance dimples drilled out by factory staff was likely not required.
                      The next day, I went to try the "on-edge nickel test". The saw table was leveled, the nickel was balanced, and the switch was toggled for power. On his first attempt, the 5 cent, immortalized Canadian beaver stayed on his feet. I walked out of the garage for a few minutes to see how long he could endure this daring act. Upon my return, the provocative, paddle-tailed rodent remained upright. I had no choice now except to flip the switch off and end his task. The switch was powered off and our noble, national creature neither shook nor shuddered, a true testament to the industrious nature of this shiny icon.
                      The Ridgid saw may need more TLC than others to get it working this well, but I am sure that it will process more wood than I will ever need before I move on to my next tool. Should Ridgid release a new bandsaw, I may not purchase it. However, I may also not be dismissive. My own experiences with this Ridgid saw are good beginner steps on learning bandsaw territory including maintenance and general FYI's. Had I purchased a more expensive bandsaw, I am not sure I would have come out as ahead in the learning department as I feel now. Sometimes, value experienced in other ways is worth more than gold!

                      edmontonian

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

                        Congrats Edmontonian! I'm glad you were able to get your wily beaver to behave. Down here in the lower 48 we have to deal with Lincoln, who seems to be just as precocious as your silvered beaver. I have yet to spend the time to really tune up my BS1400, but I'm glad to know it's possible.
                        I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

                          I reviewed this saw on this Ridgid site some time ago. You can check out the review at:

                          http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=20747

                          The saw is still working fine after several years.

                          Howard Ferstler

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

                            I reviewed this tool on this site some time ago. The article can be found at:

                            http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=20747

                            The review discusses some of the modifications I did to limit vibration and stabilize the motor mount.

                            Howard Ferstler

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: BS1400 Bandsaw Table Adjustment

                              I just finished doing all the recommended mods to my recently purchased (used) BS1400. It will now pass the nickel test! Woo Hoo! However, there is one area of concern that I have as a result of adjusting the wheels. It was necessary to put 3mm worth of shims behind the upper wheel to get it coplaner with the lower wheel. As a result, the upper wheel retaining nut now bears on the bearing itself, rather than the shoulder of the arbor. I have the nut only slightly more than finger-tight. Any suggestions on how or where I can obtain a spacer that will fit inside the bearing hole to transfer the load from the nut directly to the arbor? And is this even a problem? Am I concerned over nothing?

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