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  • True Square???

    What would your recommendations be for a framing square that would be a good value for something that would be reliably square? Do I need to spend $100 to get a square 'square'?

    I have a Johnson square purchased from Home Depot (cheapo) and it is very questionable as to how square it is.

    I don't need it for real carpentry work - looking for precision when creating panel cutting sleds, checking tool settings for square, etc...

    Thanks for your feedback.
    Of course I can build you one of those - I just need a [new tool]!

  • #2
    Put it on a table you know to have a straight edge and mark a line. Flip it over and see if is is exact.
    Steve

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    • #3
      I purchased a set of these: http://www.woodpeck.com/squares.html
      last year (although I don’t recall paying this much for them). I work in a metrology lab and have the capability of verifying their accuracy and am happy to report that they were significantly better than their .001” advertised accuracy (measurements traceable to NIST). They also come in a foam-lined box that works well for somewhat protective storage.

      Woodslayer

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      • #4
        If your framing square isn't too far out of square you can square it by hitting it in the right place with a prick punch or center punch. Now you probably want to know where "the right place" is. I wish I could remember where I read it. [img]smile.gif[/img] A google search should help. For setting up your tools you should probably use an engineers square. They are available from Rockler,
        Harbor Freight, Woodworkers Supply, etc. etc.
        I'm lucky in this respect. I have a 6" engineers square that I made as an apprentice machinist 25 years ago and it is still only a half a thousandth out after all these years. [img]smile.gif[/img] (Double mini-gloat) [img]smile.gif[/img]
        Lorax
        "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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        • #5
          I purchased a set of these:

          http://www.pricecutter.com/html/cata....asp?id=243671

          from pricecutter.com and am very satisfied with them.

          For $29.00 I think I got my monies worth. Use them for setup on all my tools.

          Also, what part of the state is Stilwell in?

          Woodrat

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          • #6
            I purchased a set of these:

            http://www.pricecutter.com/html/cata....asp?id=243671

            from pricecutter.com and am very satisfied with them.

            For $29.00 I think I got my monies worth. Use them for setup on all my tools.

            Also, what part of the state is Stilwell in?

            Woodrat

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            • #7
              I got the same set $39 CDN (bout the same price).
              Really was only looking for a 6" square but this was all I could find at the show. Have you found a use for the 2" or 3 " square yet?

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              • #8
                I really haven't found a use for the smaller ones, but they sure are cute. I guess they throw them in so you think you're really getting a good deal.

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                • #9
                  WWMick -

                  First you determine if your square is 'square' and if not, how much is it out, in which direction. As said before, find a table or board or something with a very straight side. Lay the 'square' on it and draw a perpendicular line. Flip the 'square' and draw a line right next to the first one. If the lines converge, you need to close the angle, if they diverge, you need to open the angle. To close the angle, lay the 'square' on a flat surface and using a center punch, tap the 'square' near the outside 90° corner. To open the 'square' tap with the center punch near the inner 90° corner. After a couple of experimenting hits, you can tell how hard you need to tap it. The one proviso is that you may not get the inside angle and the outside angle both square at the same time. You should choose which you use the most and square that side.

                  gator

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for the feedback. I will use the techniques suggested to see just how 'out of square' my Johnson really is. (Wait a minute, that doesn't sound quite right...)

                    Great suggestions for the engineer's squares, as well. I do own a 6" square that I would be unable to function without (hmmm, probably just thought of another reason to buy a 7" eng square)...

                    Woodrat - Stilwell is just south of Kansas City (not incorporated yet but give it another 5-10 years). From 1981 thru 1991 we lived in Hutchinson - both my kids were born there. Moved (back) to Kansas City in '91 because of job situation. Loved Hutch - great town to live in. [img]smile.gif[/img]
                    Of course I can build you one of those - I just need a [new tool]!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Gator,

                      I haven't checked it yet - but that is my fear...that the inside and outside measurements may not square up.

                      If that be the case, anyone with a suggestion on a decent (affordable and square) framing square?

                      I will probably invest in a set of eng squares for tool setup - but would still like a good framing square for the longer stuff.

                      Thanks again.

                      Mick
                      Of course I can build you one of those - I just need a [new tool]!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My Johnson is mostly square, it tends to move a bit depending on how it hits the floor
                        I would suggest that a framing square is used for framing and precision square for setting up tools.
                        The guy that built my house must have a square that is more like 85 degrees.
                        For large layouts try digging up that old math book and use geometry (A squared = b squared + c squared) etc and if the length of two diagonals are equal then you have a square.

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                        • #13
                          Mick -

                          I don't use them that much but I do have two, one I have squared to the outside angle and one squared to the inside angle. I have them marked as such and depending on what I am marking decides which one I grab. I think that you do need them when working on larger panels like 18 x 72 bookcase sides or such. Six inch engineers squares don't quite reach to the middle of 18" or too far up the 72" length.

                          gator

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                          • #14
                            Mick -

                            I don't use them that much but I do have two, one I have squared to the outside angle and one squared to the inside angle. I have them marked as such and depending on what I am marking decides which one I grab. I think that you do need them when working on larger panels like 18 x 72 bookcase sides or such. Six inch engineers squares don't quite reach to the middle of 18" or too far up the 72" length.

                            gator

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Great ideas all...

                              I did find a 6" X 14" 'Straight Edge Super Precision Flat Steel Square' (Model H2697) being sold by Grizzly for $34.95 and shipping...anybody have one or have an opinion to share?

                              Again, TIA for all responses... [img]smile.gif[/img]
                              Of course I can build you one of those - I just need a [new tool]!

                              Comment

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