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  • under-powered ridgid ts-4511

    Hey all,

    I have had my granite top for a few months now, and I am wondering if someone can help me with a problem. The saw seems to not have as much power as I would expect.

    I moved out of a shared shop with a 3hp jet cabinet saw, and bought the granite top as an affordable compromise. The problem is that the new saw seems to get bogged down when ripping a 2x4! The old jet would barely slow down ripping a 4x4 of hard rock maple, and the new saw will stall in a 3/4 sheet of birch ply with the tiniest amount of lateral motion.

    I am wondering if there are any adjustments that might need to be made to the belt, etc, because otherwise I may have bought the wrong saw.

    All of the power supply is in order, nothing else of note on the circut, etc. etc.

    Any help would be great.

  • #2
    Re: under-powered ridgid ts-4511

    I would re check all my settings to make sure they are square. Miter to blade, and then fence to blade. Also the blade you are using can make a big difference.
    The one that comes with the saw is not that good.

    I use a Freud 87R, think that is the number, thin kerf ripping blade and a 2x4 slides right through with no effort. Same with 3/4 ply, though if it is a full sheet, I can hear a small change in the motor when I don't feed it evenly which can be tough to do on a 4x8, but even at that it doesn't bog down, just complains a little.

    Also the check the circuit. If you have other equipment, lights, whatever running on the same circuit as the saw, it may not be getting all the amps it needs. I run a dedicated 20 amp circuit for my TS and RAS and only run one at a time so amp draw is not an issue.

    If you run an extension cord that is less than 12 gauge, this too could be a culprit.

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    • #3
      Re: under-powered ridgid ts-4511

      is the motor drive belt tensioned properly? on teh contractor saws, this can sometimes keep all the motor powe from getting ot the blade. just my $.02.
      there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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      • #4
        Re: under-powered ridgid ts-4511

        All great advice above. Other things to mull over: the Jet has a 3 HP motor, the R4511 is specified at 1 1/2 HP. This is a chinese motor, and this could be an optimistic rating. Look at the way Sears rates their motors. This is actually the rating at the point of stall on the motor. Not something you want to do on a table saw. The Jet also has 3 matched belts on a fixed motor mount. The Ridgid has one junky factory belt on a spring tension system. A better after market belt has already been proven to be an advantage by several users on here.

        I would look into what points have been offered from the others here, and make sure all these areas are covered and correct. If you still have major loss of power, perhaps there is a problem within the motor.

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        • #5
          Re: under-powered ridgid ts-4511

          What kind of blade are you using? The blade that came with my 3650 is good for skeet shooting and thats about it. The 3650 has the same HP rated motor and I'm able to rip 1 1/2" birch without out a burn while using freud's glue line rip full kerf blades (not the cheapest but far from the most expensive). Thin kerf is okay but I don't like the flex you can get with those, and really what a 1/16" of material (yeah I know, 16 of them add up to an inch, the question was sort of rhetorical )

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          • #6
            Re: under-powered ridgid ts-4511

            Originally posted by FINER9998 View Post
            is the motor drive belt tensioned properly? on teh contractor saws, this can sometimes keep all the motor powe from getting ot the blade. just my $.02.
            +1 for that. My 3660 would stall easily. I put it on a dedicated circuit and that didn't entirely fix the issue. I then followed the belt tensioning advice found on here, and the problem went away. Hurrah for forums!

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            • #7
              Re: under-powered ridgid ts-4511

              Why the presumption that "Made in USA" is synonymous with "quality"? I've travelled the world, and the sad fact is that "Made for the domestic US market" means 1) it's big and 2) it's cheap. This is obviously inherent to US made items for the US market.

              Take a lawnmower, for example. No consideration is given to the longevity of the product, so long as it is cheap to make and is appealing in terms of functionality, ie rideable, wide cutting width etc. I'm not saying this is a bad thing, there are lots of things in my house that wouldn't be there if they weren't so affordable.

              Take cars. GM and Chrysler have taken a serious beating over the last few years, culminating in the government protecting the workers' jobs. I happen to have bought a new Dodge this year. The paint quality is atrocious, and all the nice/good bits (with the exception of the HEMI) are Mercedes-sourced, I had them in a Merc 7 years ago. The exact same parts! And the HEMI is made in Mexico.

              OK rant mode off, but my message is that USA-made does not assure quality. Neither does Chinese made assure lack thereof.

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              • #8
                Re: under-powered ridgid ts-4511

                Your R4511 won't keep up with a 3hp cabinet saw, but if it's aligned well, and you use the proper blade, it should go through most materials up to full blade height with only a reasonably struggle. The suggestion for a Freud LU87R010 is good advice...other good rippers are the Infinity 010-124 or DeWalt DW7124PT. The Forrest WWII 30T TK will have nearly as easy time of it but will cut cleaner...and costs more. The biggest benefit of thin kerf isn't to save material, but it poses less load to the motor...a full kerf blade is 33% thicker. A high quality thin kerf blade shouldn't flex under most hobby circumstances. Keep the blade clean and sharp.

                Materials that are straight, flat, and dry are much easier to rip than a damp twisted 2x4, which can be a challenge.

                The supplied power can make a difference too. If you're circuit isn't quite adequate, or if it's a very long run, or on a long extension cord, or has other applications running on it, it could be starving your saw for power. Sometimes converting to 220v can achieve less voltage loss, giving faster startups and faster recovery from bogging.
                Last edited by hewood; 09-26-2009, 12:51 PM.

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