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  • Outfitting Workshop Tool Choices

    New to the forum and need everyones expertise here.

    I'm starting to move beyond the simple projects using my TS2412 and hand tools and would like to buy additional tools. I'd like to make small furniture pieces for the house. For instance I've been getting by without a joiner or planer using precut boards and alot of elbow grease.

    Sooo, where I need help is with what order should I buy certain tools. My budget has limitatios and I need help with priority. Here are the tools I'd like to buy in the next 6 months.
    Joiner
    Planer
    Bandsaw

    I welcome feedback and thanks for your help!

    Murph
    murph

  • #2
    Those are tough choices. I bought band saw then
    jointer and planer. It was easier for me to get planed lumber. I use a lot of glued up panels and the jointer made more sense. In the long run you need them all. But it will depend on what you are making.
    SCWood

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    • #3
      To add on to that........

      When you bring a thickness planer into your shop you will soon realize the need for Dust collection. I'm also a big fan of air filtration, as wood dust can (and does is some cases) cause a health problem. You'll never remove al of the dust from wood working, but you can greatly reduce the hazardous dust that you breath in.
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      • #4
        For me, after I had a table saw, the jointer made the most sense. I wanted to be able edge glue boards to make panels. Planed lumber is readily available and having a jointer will ensure a good joint. I don't find the edges are good enough as is to glue up without jointing. Dust collection isn't as critical with a jointer as it is a planer.

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        • #5
          My usual response:

          Router Table.

          You can use your router table as a jointer...and everything else this awesome piece of machinery will do. It can really put you in a whole new league of projects.

          [ 10-22-2003, 03:02 PM: Message edited by: Greg's Garage ]
          keep makn\' sawdust!...just don\'t breath any.

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          • #6
            GG,

            I'm one of those who does not have a jointer yet...

            I know how to joint the edge of a board with a router table, but are you suggesting you can flatten the face of a board?

            Thanks,
            -s

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            • #7
              If you will be primarily using plywood (as I did for MANY years), then you can skip the planer and jointer for now. Premium plywood (the $100 per sheet type) makes great furniture items.

              But when you start to use solid hardwoods, not just plywood, you will certainly want both the planer and jointer. And you may save enough when you buy rough lumber (rather than hardwood from the big box) to pay for both tools in the first couple projects.

              The jointer gives you straight and square. There are some tricks with saws and routers that can give you straight and square, but they aren't easy to do well.

              The planer gives you the proper thickness and parallel sides - there are almost no reasonable alternatives to do this.

              Since both planer and jointer both make rough wood smooth, they seem interchangeable, but they certainly are not. If you plane both sides of a warped or twisted board, the result is smooth and the right thickness, with parallel but not straight/flat sides.

              I lived without a bandsaw for the first 49 or so years of woodworking, and just got my third bandsaw in a year . I consider it a very useful tool, but not a high priority in my list.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the input folks, you all are a great resource [img]smile.gif[/img] Sounds as though it's a between the jointer and planer or possibly both if I can get HD to cut some deals. I'll forgo the BS until next year.

                Another question...What concerns should I have with using a DC in the basement where within 10'-15' I have a gas furnance and hot water heater. I'm moving from the garage to the basement (stepping up or down I haven't figured out yet but at least there is heat). I'll be using a 2HP 1500CFM+ system and possibly an air filtration system as well.
                murph

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by murphinDC:
                  Another question...What concerns should I have with using a DC in the basement where within 10'-15' I have a gas furnance and hot water heater.
                  My shop is in my basement. Good choice if ya ask me. I have a newer high E furnace with the firebox being inclosed or sealed. There is no open flame. My water heater does not have a pilot flame. You need to worry more about solvents than dust on the safty side. On the filter side, you'll want to find a way to lessen the amount of dust that the furnace takes in. It will clog your filter, and spread dust into the living areas. My furnace is located in a seperate room, so this isn't an issue. I do not have a cold air return in my shop, so the dust doesn't get into the returns. Using canister filtration on my DC, and an overhead AFU has really reduced the amount of dust that escapes my shop. I do get some into the family room which is off of my shop, but this is from my feet, not airborne.
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                  • #10
                    SteveG, no flattening capabilities on the router table. Just truing the edges.
                    keep makn\' sawdust!...just don\'t breath any.

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                    • #11
                      Very little a router can't do with the right jig. I've seen a jig for flattening boards. The jig sat on top of the board, keeping the router bit a a constant height, as it was run over the board. I never used this technique, but the author of the article, said it worked great.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Greg's Garage:
                        My usual response:

                        Router Table.

                        You can use your router table as a jointer...and everything else this awesome piece of machinery will do. It can really put you in a whole new league of projects.
                        Very true.
                        No Bull Dust Just Saw Dust

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                        • #13
                          I bought bandsaw first, and table saw second " should have been opposite order on those " Next purchase is router. Then Planer / Jointer. I had a lengthy discussion with professional woodworker this weekend. Those 2 tools are used pretty much together. I use alot of veneered plywoods and milled lumber like you.

                          - I would add dust collection as important too. I don't have them but after talking with my woodworking friend and reading post on here regarding lung problems, They are HIGHLY recommended. If we wait til we think we need them, it'll probably be too late.

                          Good luck
                          Jake

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