Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cross cutting large panel's.

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Cross cutting large panel's.

    I am in the middle of a Mission style coffee table and end table project. I am at the step where I cut the glued up tops to finished size. I was able to cut the shelf with my cross cut sled but the tops are to big.

    How do you cut a panel that is over 2' by 4'? I was going to use my Porta Cable skill saw or my Worm Drive with a fence clamped down but when I did a test cut it made one ugly cut.

    I thought of making a larger cross cut sled but to make one the size I need it would be to heavy with the tops on it to use.

    The only idea I have is to go get a good blade or my worm drive or skill saw and try that.

    Looking for some ideas.

    Thanks
    Charles
    Charles

  • #2
    Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

    There's a couple of things you can do. I get a good cut using a Skil 77 with a steel plywood blade. I prefer steel to carbide blades in this application, they seem to give me a smoother cut with less splintering, and they are generally less than $10. With splintery woods like oak ply, I make the cut in two passes. First put a strip of masking tape along the cut line. The first is a scoring cut, with the blade depth set just deep enough to go through the face veneer. Then go back, re-adjust your depth, and make the final cut.

    You can also rough out the cut with the worm drive and then make a pass with a handheld router and a clamped fence. A good router (1/2 shank preferred) and sharp bit leaves a top quality edge. But you have to set your fence up carefully, as it's easy for things to get out of square.

    You can also clamp a straight, stout piece of wood to the underside of your panel, then run this along the edge of the tablesaw top. You typically align the blade to the t-slots, so you have to check to see that your blade is going to be ok relative to the edge of the table, which now becomes your fence. On my saw, the slots are quite parallel to the edge so it's not an issue.

    I don't use a sled, either. I find them cumbersome to use on large panels, they take up room in the garage that I can't afford to have taken up, and these other methods work fine for me.

    Good luck!

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

      I agree with rough cutting, and then cleaning up with a router. If you take care and cross measure your finish points for square, everything will be fine.

      If you want to put the real "art & craft" into it, rough cut it then use a hand plane to clean it up.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

        2'x4' is definately a large panel. i'd either build an infeed table for my table saw and a crosscut guide or add a zero clearance shoe to my circular/worm drive saw and use a straight edge to guide it. only the front 1" to 1 1/2" of saw blade needs the ZCI on the saw sole plate. then cut it with the good side down. HTH.
        there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

          Originally posted by FINER9998 View Post
          2'x4' is definately a large panel. i'd either build an infeed table for my table saw and a crosscut guide or add a zero clearance shoe to my circular/worm drive saw and use a straight edge to guide it. only the front 1" to 1 1/2" of saw blade needs the ZCI on the saw sole plate. then cut it with the good side down. HTH.
          This is generally what I do as well; I built my surrounding cabinets to the same height as the TS so I could use them as side/infeed support for large panels.

          That, coupled with a large block connected at 90 degrees to dual runners ensures the panel remains properly aligned for the cut (obviously the stack mitre guage is way too small for a cut like this).

          Whatever you do, please post pics when you're done! I love these style tables and would like to build one myself; I'd love to see the finished piece!

          Cheers,
          Jeff

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

            Thanks everyone for your idea's. I think I am going to go ahead and try the fence with my Skill 77 that Andy mentioned. I had used this idea in the past before I bought my ts but that was always for stuff that you really did not need a clean edge for.

            Andy, don't you get burn with a steel blade? I like the idea of doing two passes. I will let you know how it comes out.

            This is my second solid oak mission style piece of furniture I have made. The first was a King bed. I will try to post some pictures.

            Again, thanks everyone.

            Charles
            Charles

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

              the best way is to extend the saws fence to where you can go out to about 49" from the blade,

              (why these companies do not make a screw in extensions or bolt on, for the fence rails. Is more than I know),
              it is best to have a wing support under the fence, to keep the materials from dropping under the bottom of the fence,

              then use a side support table on the other side if your cutting 4x8 sheets,
              and and out feed table as well,

              if your working by your self, even if you have help I think the out feed tables are the best way to go, as you have control of the board or panels not trying to work together, If you do get help try to convince them to support the panel not pull it or guide it, let the operator guide it,
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
              attributed to Samuel Johnson
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

                I know ideally having a fence/table extension is the way to go but my wood shop is one bay of a 3 car garage and room is at a premium. I have thought of building a drop down leaf extension. That would be #692 on my to do list.

                Charles
                Charles

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

                  Originally posted by NW Diver View Post
                  Thanks everyone for your idea's. I think I am going to go ahead and try the fence with my Skill 77 that Andy mentioned. I had used this idea in the past before I bought my ts but that was always for stuff that you really did not need a clean edge for.

                  Andy, don't you get burn with a steel blade? I like the idea of doing two passes. I will let you know how it comes out.

                  This is my second solid oak mission style piece of furniture I have made. The first was a King bed. I will try to post some pictures.

                  Again, thanks everyone.

                  Charles
                  Hi Charles,

                  I haven't had a problem with burning unless the blade is dull. When that happens, they're so cheap I just toss it and put on another. But my comments were aimed at plywood panels. If your panel is glued up out of lumber, then I would probably go with a carbide blade. Crosscutting hardwood plywood (which is really hardwood veneer over softwood interior plys) is the only application where I like a steel blade over carbide.

                  The two pass method works really well with hardwood ply, which likes to splinter. Lumber panels aren't as splintery but it still helps, especially with oak. Zero clearance shoes are a great idea also but I'm far too lazy to do that, if I can avoid the splinters with two passes. The time is always in the setup, not the actual cutting, so making two passes is pretty quick.

                  Good luck!

                  Andy

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

                    you could always get a better blade for your circular saw. you probably have the construction blade that it came with still attached

                    get a nice crosscut blade, something with 40-60 teeth and it will work much better

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

                      putting a non marking/staining tape (masking tape) over the kerf or cut area before cutting can help on the splintering, and or depending on how good you follow a line use a utility knife to score the cut before sawing, on the edges of the blades cut,
                      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                      attributed to Samuel Johnson
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

                        I ended up using my worm drive with a new thin kerf Freud blade. Laid tape down and did two cuts. Came out great.

                        Thanks
                        Charles

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

                          I had a bunch of doors (17) to trim the bottom off to gain additional clearance for carpeting, tile, and engineered flooring. It was more than a router trim so I opted to use the table saw.

                          I built a big sled from a 3'x4.5' piece of 3/4" plywood I had.
                          My outfeed table is big enough to catch the sled as it comes out the back, but to support the 4.5 foot width I made a 8 foot long rail from a piece of 1" Sch 40 PVC that I supported with three RIDGID FlipTop stands. I would have used a piece of 1" EMT, aluminum, or copper but didn't have any in the shop, just the PVC. The sled was setup to run on the left of the blade, with the offcut to the right. The 8 foot support rail was positioned so there was ~4' before and after the arbor. This allowed it to support the sled through its full travel. The sled also has a fence along the near side at 90 deg to the blade.

                          I made a guide rail and mounted it to the underside of the sled out toward the left side running from front to back and mounted a dozen skate bearings on it. They are spaced about 6" apart and alternate sides. The bearings ride on a 45 angle so they contact the rail underneath at about 10 and 2 O'Clock. This configuration keeps them centered over the 1" PVC rail. The underside of the sled where it rides over the TS table has two strips of 1/32" x 3/4" UHMW plastic on it. This reduces friction to minimum between the slick strips and the bearings, even with a heavy door mounted on it.

                          With a RIDGID R1090C blade mounted in the TS I got nice clean cuts on all the doors. the amount trimmed was from 1-1/2" to as little as 3/8".

                          Probably put an hour and a half into building the sled and support rail, but trimming the door bottoms after that was only a minute or two each.
                          ---------------
                          Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                          ---------------
                          “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                          ---------
                          "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                          ---------
                          sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

                            bob...any chance of a photo or two of that set up?
                            there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Cross cutting large panel's.

                              I use my 18-volt Ridgid cordless 6-1/2 to rough cut to size, usually within a 1/4" of final which I then do on the table saw. I have had occasion where my final cut was done with the cordless though.

                              I use a thin-kerf Freud blade (36-tooth, IIRC). On cuts with the grain, there's no tear-out; but, there is some splintering on cross-grain. To minimize that, I've used blue painter's tape. But, I've also gone down the cutline and scribed it first with a new-blade utility knife. This practically eliminates the splintering as long as I'm "dead-on" accurate with the final saw cut.

                              Oh, I should mention that I use a "factory-edge" piece of ply on the right, out-side edge of the saw's base plate (it's exactly 4-1/4" to the inside of the blade teeth) On my Ridgid 18-volt cordless, the blade is to the left of the motor.

                              For a support table, I use two folding saw horses and two pieces of glued-up maple flooring which is about 6 x 1 ft. I arrange them to maximize the support and can use either the outside or split area a path for the blade. In the picture below, I've got the table in use for another task, but it's the same when I'm cutting a ply sheet.




                              I hope this helps,

                              CWS

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X