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MS1290LZ and dust collection

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  • MS1290LZ and dust collection

    I searched (here and other places), but had very little good luck with finding a way to improve the dust collection on my MS1290. After scratching my head for a while (well, quite a while, like a couple of years), a couple of ideas finally came to mind

    I had to do a little jury rigging, but finally found a way to connect the (so called) factory dust port to my DC system. Better yet, I then found a way to set up a "shroud" (for lack of a better word) to do a better job of picking up the dust as it is getting generated.

    I'm pretty happy with the results, so I thought I'd post a few pix here and see what the pros think... Note that the dust in the pix is almost all from before my "shroud" adaptation, a lot less of it gets by these days. I'm just too lazy to clean things up, and I figure nobody here would be shocked at a little sawdust

    What do you folks think?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: MS1290LZ and dust collection

    Holy Cr#p, I just looked at my original post and saw that I need to clean that blade!

    I can't believe I let that get so bad!

    By the way, Goof Off (a gallon from Home Depot) is what I use for cleaning blades. From the looks of things, I'll be getting another gallon tomorrow...

    Also, I used some old inner tube material for the "shroud". I found that one piece backed by another (a little smaller) one was the cat's meow for my setup. A little experimenting here is a good thing.

    As for setting up the "dust port connection" improvement, I hope the pictures kind of say what needs to be said.

    Happy trails folks

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    • #3
      Re: MS1290LZ and dust collection

      I reviewed this saw on the Ridgid site some time ago. The review is at:

      http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=20748

      In the review, I describe how I made it possible to quickly install or remove a metal deflecting plate under the dust intake that helps a dust-collecting machine scavenge dust being generated by the blade. The blade uses a simple wing nut to hold it in place and it can be removed completely and quickly for hard-over bevel cuts. The work does involve drilling a small hole in the bottom of the dust chute.

      Howard Ferstler

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      • #4
        Re: MS1290LZ and dust collection

        Howard,

        Would you have a pic you'd like to share?

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        • #5
          Re: MS1290LZ and dust collection

          Here is a shot of the deflector plate.

          Howard
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            Re: MS1290LZ and dust collection

            Hey, I need to do some commenting about that photo of mine I just posted. I was on the phone while posting it and have discovered that I am not good at doing two things at once.

            Anyway, note how it is held in place by a single screw inside of the throat area of the dust chute. The wing nut is below and all one needs to do is remove the nut and the deflector and screw come out. It is easy to install, too, and in addition to that long deflector I have a shorter one.

            You need the short one when working with thicker wood or if you are doing bevel cuts. Without the quick-removal feature you can get into trouble when doing thick wood or bevels. The deflector was made of galvanized, light-gauge sheet metal, with the edges bend upward a bit to help funnel the dust into the chute.

            I have the saw attached to a semi-portable, roll-around stand (fitted with a Wolfcraft metal stand assembly on top) and there is a flexible hose running from the dust outlet down to a 2.5-inch fitting on the side of the stand. That fitting extends through the stand and it lets me hook up a dust collector quick and easy.

            The only thing I had to do to get the deflector in place was drill a small hole in the aluminum chute throat (I used a Ryobi low-profile drill for that job), making sure the hole would accommodate the screw and wing-nut I wanted to use. The sheet metal deflector was drilled, too, of course.

            Some diddling was required to get the size and shape I needed with each, but just about any experienced woodworker could make something like this.

            I'd supply a picture of the saw on the stand, except that the last time I tried the Ridgid site will not handle the higher resolution of that particular shot.

            If anybody wants a picture of that stand/saw combo (in order to build something like that), say something here and I will do more shots at a resolution the Ridgid site can handle.

            Howard

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