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INCRA TWIN LINEAR

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  • INCRA TWIN LINEAR

    I AM A NEW MEMBER AND HAVE ENJOYED READING THE
    POSTS FOR THE LAST SEVERAL WEEKS! I HAVE SEVERAL
    RIGID TOOLS. 3612 TABLE SAW, JOINTER,PLANER,DRILL
    PRESS,AND SPINDLE SANDER. I AM ALSO AN ABSOLUTE
    BEGINNER. A FRIEND OF MINE HAS A INCRA ULTRA JIG
    AND LOVES IT. I WAS THINKING ON BUYING THE TWIN
    LINEAR WITH TABLE, ROUTER LIFT, ROUTER MOTER (PORTER CABLE). MY QUESTION IS DO ANY OF YOU HAVE
    ANY EXPERIENCE WITH THIS SYSTEM OR OTHER SUGGESTIONS? I WOULD BUY THE WHOLE THING FROM
    WOODPECKERS.

  • #2
    I own the Incra Twin Linear, with a Precision Router Lift (PRL) and a Porter+Cable router. I bought it from Woodpeckers about a year ago. I use this system for all of my table-type routing operations. In general, I would say that this system is pretty good. The fence is made with quality materials, and it is accurate. The table is solid, and the leg set is very dependable. But the best part of the system, by far, is the PRL. I love being able to set bit height without fidgeting under the table all the time. The Twin Linear fence allows you to offset the outfeed (or infeed) sides as needed for jointing operations, and it has a great dust-control system (if you hook up a shop vac to the back of the fence). The system has some amazing capabilities to do box joints and special dovetails, using a dizzying array of templates described in a full-color book that comes with the system. I have to admit, though, that I have not used all these templates as I thought I would when I bought the system. From my point of view, there are some weaknesses to this system that prevent it from getting a top rating.

    1. The fence micro-adjust feature is cumbersome. The micro-adjust knobs for the infeed and outfeed fences are located at widely different places on the system (the infeed micro-adjust knob is near the front of the fence, and the outfeed micro-adjust knob is at the rear of the fence). Also, to adjust the infeed or outfeed fence backward, you simply turn the knob, but to adjust it forward, you have to turn the knob and pull on the fence. When I bought it, I was under the impression that it was like a shaper fence, where you just turn the micro-adjust knob one way or the other. Also, you have to always remember to "switch" the fence into micro-adjust mode. Finally, if you micro-adjust the fence too far out, it messes up the whole system. In a system this expensive, I believe there could have been a better micro-adjust method.

    2. The price. This system is expensive. I'm operating from memory here, but the whole system (table, fence, router, and PRL) were over $800. For a few hundred more dollars, I could have purchased a Delta shaper, which would have all the features I wanted, plus better micro-adjust system. Of course, i would not have access to all those templates for dovetails and box joints, but to tell you the truth, I don't use those that much anyway.

    There is no question about the quality of construction. This is a well-made system. But I think, if I were to do it all over again, I would probably have bought one of Woodpecker's less expensive fence systems (for example, the Wonder Fence). My reason for saying this is that, even with all of the amazing features the Twin Linear fence offers, I find myself doing things that could be done on a simpler system most of the time.

    Bottom line: if you plan on doing a lot of dovetails and box joints, the Twin Linear may be a good idea for you. If you want a router table to do mostly basic routing operations, with occasional jointing, I would say to save some money and look into a more straightforward system.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks, Matthew, for the detailed information. I too am fairly new to woodworking and I am taking my time (also motivated by budget) about getting started with my own shop. I have veiwed the Woodpecker video and am very intersted in the Twin Linear, so your input is paticulairly important to me. Have you used any of the other Incra products and do you think the Jointech products would be about the same or are there other speciality fences and products on the market that I might wish to consider?
      I was thinking that by purchasing something like the Incra Twin Linear I might not need a joiner or at least the Incra would do many of the same functions, however with so little experience in this I might be letting my perfectionist attitude delay my getting started. Any thoughts from you and others would be welcome.
      thepapabear<BR>When a bureaucrat has a hammer, everything begins to look like a nail.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have not used any of the systems by Joint Tech, but I have been curious about there for a while. When I first started out as a woodworker, I owned a Craftsman table -- doesn't everyone start that way? Then I owned a Bench Dog table. After that, I built my own from plans shown in the "Portable Router Book" by Richard J. de Cristoforo (a book I highly recommend by the way). Then I got the Twin Linear. Like you, I was thinking of getting shaper capabilities and router-table capabilities all in one. Probably, the best system I had was the one I built myself.

        But I can't really knock the Twin Linear too much. I mean, it's accurate and well made, and the PRL is a joy to use. In fact, everything Woodpecker sells seems to be made very nicely. If they could improve the micro-adjust feature on the Twin Linear, I'd be very happy. The way it is now, the micro-adjusting takes a long time to get it where you want it to be. My main problem is that, for the money, I don't see that the Twin Linear is getting me a lot more than other fence systems that cost a lot less.

        By the way, I checked the pricing, and I actually spent closer to $900 on this system.

        There are good Delta shapers starting at around $1,600. If you want the Powermatic (the one I would love) it's more like $2,000. Of course, shaper cutters are a lot more money than router bits (average around $200 each as opposed to $45), and they are more dangerous. But if you do the kind of work I do (a lot of end-shaping, raised panel doors, tongue-and-groove joints) then it might be better to save up for a shaper rather than going with the Twin Linear. Also, I'd suggest looking at some of the other router systems available from Woodpecker. There is no issue with quality, only with what is needed for your purposes.

        Comment


        • #5
          Matthew,
          Thanks for the quick reply. I suppose I need to spend some time in someone's shop or at a woodworking show to get a better feel for where I may be heading. I just viewed the Woodpecker site and I am wondering if there TS systems with the TS-3 and the router table extension(s) would be worth considering.
          I have seen others discuss why they would prefer a left or right side router table extension on the TS, but other than the location of the motor, and I plan to buy (have not yet) a Ridgid 3612 contractors saw with the motor hanging from the back. What if any is the advantage of each?
          Again thanks for the reply.
          thepapabear<BR>When a bureaucrat has a hammer, everything begins to look like a nail.

          Comment


          • #6
            Papabear writes: I suppose I need to spend some time in someone's shop

            Drop me a line, we'll work something out. [img]smile.gif[/img]

            Dave

            Comment


            • #7
              THANKS MATTHEW FOR ALL THE INFORMATION YOU PROVIDED ON THE INCRA TWIN LINEAR. I REALLY APPRECIATE THE HELP. THE MAIN THING I WAS INTERESTED IN WAS MAKING ALL THE FANCY JOINTS.
              THERE IS A WOODWORKING SHOW COMING TO KANSAS CITY
              IN FEB. WHERE WOODPECKERS WILL HAVE ALL THE INCRA
              STUFF ON DISPLAY SO MAYBE I WILL WAIT TILL THEN
              AND DISCUSS THE ADJUSTMENT PROBLEMS YOU MENTION
              WITH THEM!

              Comment


              • #8
                Very Good Disscussion... CCONN...

                All CAPS is generaly considered Yelling or Angry words in internet forums.

                And it is hard to read

                Good luck with your wood adventures.

                Comment

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