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  • Necessary tools

    I know there was a thread on this before but couldn't seem to find it. I'm just starting to set up a small shop and would like some advice on the most necessary tools.
    I have a table saw (3612), a 12" miter saw (not a slider).
    I'll be building mostly small furniture, bookshelves.
    I picked up the ts used and bought all the safety stuff that was missing, a good cross-cut sled etc.
    I'm thinking band saw, drill press, router and table...
    What do you guys think?
    Thanks
    Guy Coulston

  • #2
    Re: Necessary tools

    All the tools you mentioned would be a definite plus to your shop. None are really necessary but certainly would make most jobs easier. I'd also add a jointer and planer to that list. Clamps, you gotta have clamps and don't forget about a random orbital sander. Two pieces of equipment that really are necessary would be a dust collection system and safety glasses. This list can go on an on because once you start collecting tools it becomes a sickness.........like clamps, you just never seem to have enough.
    ================================================== ====
    All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

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    • #3
      Re: Necessary tools

      I agree that you have a excellent start,

      the planer is very nice and I enjoy mine and use it a lot, but a jointer is very helpful if your going to edge glue up lumber,

      a planer is for thickness and surfacing rough sawed lumber,

      clamps are great, and like said the more the better,

      yes it is great to have a fully outfitted shop, for example it is great to have a band saw, but unless your doing projects that need a lot of curves cut you may not use one a lot, yes it is nice for some shoulder cuts, but a jig saw can fill the need many times, or a router and a template,

      a drill press is nice, and I have one in the wood shop, but really do not use it as much as I figured I would, but it is like any tool when you want it or need it is very important,
      (now my drill press in the metal shop is used on most every project),

      the router I would really suggest, and a nice set of bits, the table is nice as well or step up to a true shaper, but the router is used a lot in my shop, (I think I only have 4 of them), one of the things that is nice is set one up for a operation and then you can leave it set up and use the second one for another step or process, such as when cutting dovetails it is nice to leave set until the project is complete just in case
      (No, I did not say run out and buy 4 routers),

      I suggest start by planing some simple projects, and figure out the process of the fabrication of the project, and what tools will be needed, and proceed in building your shop by what you need,

      many of the additions I have added to the shop have been do to some feature of the project or an attempt to make a easer or better or faster assembly or joints,

      along that line I would suggest a Kreg jig with that list, (I have found I like it for many projects and find it strong and easily to use), yes it is a joint that doesn't take a lot of craftsmanship, (neither does biscuit or dowels) but are all good joining systems for most types of projects, (when I first started building custom cabinets for face frames, I bought a twin bit doweling machine, foot operated, and used that for a number of years, then tried the biscuit cutter, and was not greatly impressed, there are places it is nice, but mine sets most of the time, but I really like the Kreg jig for many fastening needs.
      http://www.kregtool.com/index.php I tried a cheap copy and nearly gave up on the system,

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      it looks like to me you have a good start,
      I would look at a router (and possibly do some study or a book on how to use it), and a nice set of assorted bits. (one can do a multitude of things with a router and the knowledge of how to use it), yes there are other tools that in time will replace some of the cuts or things one can do with a router, but for starters, it can fill in a lot of gaps with a few bits and few jigs,

      a random orbit sander I would add very soon as well,

      a good quality Dado head I would consider as well, and a good blades for the saws,

      a good varable reversable speed Drill, for drilling and driving screws, actuly I would sugest two of them,

      and do not over look making quality jigs for making things work,

      one more thing, PUSH STICKS and BLOCKS, keep those fingers away from the cutting parts,
      Last edited by BHD; 10-29-2009, 02:17 PM.
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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      • #4
        Re: Necessary tools

        I would get a nice cordless drill if you don't have one. That will see a lot of use outside of wood projects. I also use my air nailers, especially my brad nailer on every project.

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        • #5
          Re: Necessary tools

          one of the things is that people work differently, If you look at the new Yankee work shop threads, you will see the statement he worked differently than I did,

          so I may like the Kreg jig, some one else my be a biscuit jointer and some one else may want to use lap joints, or mortised and tendon, for many of the joints, so to say one NEEDS some thing is not nessarly true, take wood work of 150 or 200 years ago, they had no power tools, all hand tools, and did majestic work (or that that survives to day),

          I have seen some beautiful cabinets and shelves that were built just with hand tools and possibly a skil type saw,

          we have some shelves in our pantry that were built about 1905, as good as the day they were built and beautiful, (they used some tongue and grove milled lumber in the process), but all the rest was by hand. and with minimal hand tools I believe,

          so to give one a list of tools needed is difficult, much easer to have a project and plan and than figure out what tools are best suited to accomplish that goal,

          but you have IMO the two major "stationary" tools and the heart of the modern wood shop, the table saw, and I think the next nicest power tool the power miter saw,

          just like Sawatzky said he would add air nailer's to the list, My SIL choose the brad nailer's before some of the other large tools in his shop,
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

          Comment

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