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  • Dado blades

    I'm looking for a dado blade for my new 3650. HD sells a stacked dado by United States Saw (an Oldham co.). Does anyone have experience with this blade? Cost is $80. What others would you suggest? I started assembly of my 3650 last night - hope to finish today!

  • #2
    Steve
    Welcome to the forum. [img]smile.gif[/img] Congratulations on your new toy, I have one and I really like it. I also have the Oldham dado set and it works very well for me.
    Just a couple tips on saw set-up. The front rail takes 5 bolts, not 4 as per inst. The 3 nuts and bolts you have left over are to attach an aux fence to the rip fence if you want to. Alignment is critical for safe and efficient use of your saw. Harbor freight has a dial indicator and magnetic base on sale for about $8 each. That is the most accurate way to align the blade and fence to the miter slots.
    Hope you enjoy your new saw and don't hesitate to ask if you have any more questions (or do a search and you will probably find most of the info you need).
    Edited to add:
    Also, see "dado for 3612" in the "general power tools discussion".

    [ 03-13-2004, 10:14 AM: Message edited by: Lorax ]
    Lorax
    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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    • #3
      The Oldham set is ok. I have found in the HD's a Freud stack dado set for $89. I like that one better but how much you use it is something to think about.

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      • #4
        I also have the Freud 208 from HD. It works like a dream in my 3650. May cost a little more but no complaints here.

        However, like Woodndust said, depends on usage.
        see ya \'round the bend

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        • #5
          I have the 8" dado from CMT. You can not go wrong with one of their dado sets or their blades for that matter. I have used Forest WWI and WWII blades, Freud blades and they are all fine blades. However IMHO I do not think there is a better saw blade out there than CMT.
          I came...<br /><br />I saw...<br /><br />I changed the plans.

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          • #6
            Sorry, forgot the link.
            http://www.cmtusa.com/store/index1.ihtml?x_page=store.ihtml&id=CID124220209&st ep=2&parentid=CID7444382571&pagetitle=&menuinclude =leftnav_products.ihtml&titleimage=titles_sawblade s. jpg
            I came...<br /><br />I saw...<br /><br />I changed the plans.

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            • #7
              Hey all, been awhile since I've had a chance to actually sit down and be sociable. But for what it's worth, I use the Freud dado stack sold at HD for around $85, on rare occasions.

              To be perfectly honest, there is no better way to do dado's than to route them. I will on occasion use the dado stack on large panels, and it works great. I have never used the CMT or Forest Dado's. I see not the worth in the investment.

              There are those who can't do a thing without using the table saw. I am exact opposite. It's all in methods of work. Several endings can be equially acheived through different routes. It's what works best for you, and you feel comfortable with, get the best results, and consistantcy, and feel the most safe with.

              If you're just looking to slash some grooves in wood, I suggest the $30 C3 Dado Stack from Harbor Freight. It's good practic for the real thing, and it does well on most any stock until it dulls. I also suggest duplicating it with a router table. Then you'll see what fine tuning joints are all about.

              MaMa turned X8 today, so this old X4 year old man is gunna go jump on a birthday run. Pray my heart don't explode!

              Just remember, it's all for enjoyment; satisfaction; and bragging rights. So enjoy, and brag like grandma with 12 dozen grand kids!
              John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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              • #8
                I have to agree with UO_Woody. On most of my dado's I to use my router. However when doing a large project that require several dados, to cut I will switch to the table saw setup. It is faster to make all the necessary repetative cuts on all your stock before changing the fence for the next set of cuts. If you are not looking to do a lot of dado work and a good edge guide will suffice I would go the router route if you have a good router.
                I came...<br /><br />I saw...<br /><br />I changed the plans.

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