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  • Need help for a good start in woodworking

    Hi everyone.
    Just to introduce myself, I am an automotive technician and a tool lovers. I like quality tool like Snap-on and other good brands.
    I have decided to get in woodworking to get something else than mechanic to do and for home projects. I have been shopping for approx 6 months for a saw, went on many stores and web sites. The Ridgid TS2424 always came on top with few others way more expensive.

    I had a crush on the TS2424 when saw it at HD,however because of it's price my lack of knowledge in woodworking I did not want to invest that much. I was waiting for HD to get the TS2400 on promotion with the two wheels stand. What a nice surprise when I got the HD flyer last wednesday and found the picture and the description of the TS2424 on page 3, retail price $696.00 CAD
    FYI:
    Live Rates as of 2001.10.15 03:08:59 GMT. 696.00 CAD Canada Dollars = 446.063 USD
    United States Dollars
    1 CAD = 0.640896 USD 1 USD = 1.56032 CAD
    However it was a huge misprint, the model advertised was TS2414 which in fact does not exist as far as I know.

    Being shopping for that long I kind of figure it was a mistake and went to HD. After 2 days of hard work, I finally got it for that price. I haven't open box yet but I am very proud of it.

    Now I am seeking for good web sites, magazines and books to learn the basic about using a table saw to it's max.
    I so far went to the following URL:
    Carpentry Using a Table Saw

    Home page :
    Home Improvement Encyclopedia
    Any other web sites to suggest?
    Does Ridgid plans to provide good tips for biginners on his websites with illustrations or videos?

    Thanks to Ridgid for this website, I would probably never bought this saw if it was not lifetime warranty and this web site did not exist. Keep up with the good work! Denis. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  • #2
    Oops

    HD Canadian retail price for the TS2424 is $998.00 while the TS2412 is $696.00.
    In other words I had the the TS2424 for the price of the TS2412. Thanks for the misprint on page 3 of the last wednesday Oct/10/2001 HD flyer.

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    • #3
      If your looking for books to learn with go to amazon.com or bn.com They have alot of woodbooks on about anything you want to know. Also, you might try your local library...Donny

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      • #4
        Thank you Ridgid_rocks I went to Amazon.com and found many interesting titles. However I like to see what's in the book before to buy it. Will try to find more websites and visit the municpal library and some book stores. I will certainly add every helpfull website that i find on this forum.

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        • #5
          I am new to this stuff, too, and have found a ton of good sites. Here are a few that I like. Even if they don't answer your question directly, you can go to the forum and ask for help.
          http://www.shopnotes.com/
          http://www.woodworking.org/
          http://www.woodworkersworkshop.com/d...ks/Plans_Free/ (Free plans here)

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          • #6
            Check out a publication called "Woodsmith". It has tips, free plans, and a varity of projects in every volume. A store called Woodcraft has the complete library. Try searching for these two names on the internet.

            Good Luck and Have Fun

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            • #7
              Denis,
              The table saw is an amazing machine that can provide you with an incredible amount of enjoyment in woodworking. It is arguably the machine that a good wood working shop is built around. It can also be the most dangerous machine too. Books are very good, but I would also suggest you check with your local community college, or woodworking store, to see if classes are available so that you can get the most out of your saw in the safest manner possible.

              Gene

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              • #8
                One of the best sites I've found is WomeminWoodworking.com. Its hosted by Rockler and that is not bad, and yea they let guys in too. I find the forum just great for beginners like me.
                thepapabear<BR>When a bureaucrat has a hammer, everything begins to look like a nail.

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                • #9
                  Thanks to all of you for your suggestions.
                  I haven't assembled the table saw yet, (it's my Christmas gift) hoowever I read one good book from the library and learned enough so far to understand that safety is the # 1 rule.

                  I am seeking forward to learn more and start to use that great tool. Thank's again to Ridgid for this great website and all of you that helps each other. Denis !

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                  • #10
                    In addition to "Woodsmith", I would reccommend "ShopNotes", their sister publication. They're both great and well worth the subscription price. Check them out at the following link!

                    August Home Publishers
                    - Tim

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                    • #11
                      Well I went to the store over the weekend and looked at few woodworker magazines.

                      These are the two magazines that impressed me the most "WOOD" and "SHOPNOTES". I liked them enough to subcribe to both of them. I am now waiting to receive my first issue.

                      Thanks for your comments.

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                      • #12
                        Dennis mentioned a site " Carpentry using a table saw" They show about using feather boards and push sticks and mention preventing kickback. The illustraitionis actually a recipe for kickback, with the feather board pushing the work right into the side of the blade.A feather board should onlybe used behind the bladeto keep the work pushed up against the fence. to prevent kickback a splitter should be used to prevent saw kurf closing upafter passing the blade. This post in the interest of safety

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