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  • New Member, New Table Saw

    Hi,

    I just want to introduce myself and say hello! I purchased a new Ridgid TS2424 10 Inch Deluxe Table Saw yesterday and hope to use and enjoy it for many years. This is my first table saw actually. I've used a 10" RA saw as my main cutting tool for many many years and finally broke down after looking around a while and decided on this model. A 'great deal' at HD. It looks impressive & I hope it works as good as it looks! Not even out of the box yet! If anyone has any setup tips, or any other tips, let me know. I'd appreciate any and all. Thanks in advance.

    J J

  • #2
    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by J J:
    Hi,

    I just want to introduce myself and say hello! I purchased a new Ridgid TS2424 10 Inch Deluxe Table Saw yesterday and hope to use and enjoy it for many years. This is my first table saw actually. I've used a 10" RA saw as my main cutting tool for many many years and finally broke down after looking around a while and decided on this model. A 'great deal' at HD. It looks impressive & I hope it works as good as it looks! Not even out of the box yet! If anyone has any setup tips, or any other tips, let me know. I'd appreciate any and all. Thanks in advance.

    J J
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>



    [This message has been edited by danomal (edited 12-07-2000).]

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome to the Ridgid family. I know you enjoy your TS-2424. I own one and it he best tablesaw I've ever used. The best advice I can give you is read through the owmers man. first. And take you time. You see the set up call for the uses for a try square. If you dont have one buy a good one. Please spend the extra money and get one that is true. 90 deg. has top be 90 deg. Take you time any errors in set up will show up in your first project. And please get help when you get to the step were you set the saw on the legs. The saw is heavy. THe saw is easy to put together and set up. IF you follow owners man. you should have no problems. You made a great choise with the TS-2424. I'm sure you be as happy with yours as I am with mine. Let me know how it goes. If you have any question please e-mail me.
      Regards Daniel Maloney

      Comment


      • #4
        Welcome to RIDGID. If you have any questions or comments during the assembly feel free to post them here

        Jake

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        • #5
          JJ, After you make sure that everything is true, square, 90 degrees, ect... Make some precision jigs. You'll need to make a cross cutting jig, a panel cutter, a tenoning jig, and a tapering jig just to name a few. Good jigs make a world of difference. Keep your blades clean and sharp and have some fun. Jim

          Comment


          • #6
            I will second Dan on the true 90 degree square. When I set my TS-2424 up I had a hell of a time trying to set the blade parallel to the mitre slot. Even had a friend come over and try. So you can imagine what an idiot I fealt like after messing with it for 3 days, only to find out that it was my combo square that wasn't (square that is). got a new square, had the heel set to within .003 in five minutes (verified with a new dial indicator last night). Other than that, just take your time and read the instructions and watch the video.

            -Rob

            -Rob<br /> <a href=\"http://home.comcast.net/~robritch/\" target=\"_blank\">http://home.comcast.net/~robritch/</a> <br />Damn, I hit the wrong nail again. Ouch that hurts

            Comment


            • #7
              I have questions on the setup also.
              I just assembled the table saw but want to confirm the setscrews' alignments. For the 90 degree setscrew. It appears that once you adjusted the squareness and try to tighten the setscrew, the blade will tilt a little bit. Does anyone have this problem too?
              Also, the front tru-union was very difficult to move. Unlike the rear one, it doesn't even appeared to be moving at all.
              Further, I was unable to lossen the tilt needle screw. Is there any special way to do this?
              Thanks

              Comment


              • #8
                Congradulations on your purchase.

                I too am looking at the 2424 table saw.
                You mentioned that you got a "great deal" -- how much did you have to pay? I'm waiting for Home Depot to put the 2424 on sale so I can join the party

                Comment


                • #9
                  <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by cwmoser:
                  Congradulations on your purchase.

                  I too am looking at the 2424 table saw.
                  You mentioned that you got a "great deal" -- how much did you have to pay? I'm waiting for Home Depot to put the 2424 on sale so I can join the party
                  <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                  cwmoser, I did answer you in regard to this question in a previous post at the "Poor Ridgid displays at Home Depot" topic. My wife bought the TS2424 as a gift for my birthday in December and yes, she got a 'great deal' in my opinion.---$100.00 off in return for turning in an old power tool. From what I've seen posted at this site however, there are no promotions going on right now. Usually my luck is not so good and something will go on sale immediately after I buy it! Good luck.

                  J J

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Workboy, a couple thoughts on your questions:

                    "It appears that once you adjusted the squareness and try to tighten the setscrew, the blade will tilt a little bit." After setting the blade to 90, then the stop screw, I bevel the blade, return it, and check where I'm at. Then fiddle with the screw until it's good. Takes about three passes.

                    "the front trunnion was very difficult to move." If you mean when you bevel it, its because you forgot to loosen the bevel lock, my favorite trick.

                    "Further, I was unable to lossen the tilt needle screw." Bevel indicators (tilt needles) are almost useless on any U.S. style tablesaw. I wouldn't spend a moment trying to adjust one. For a nice way to tell what bevel you are at, use your miter gauge (or other best method) to cut a board at the angles you wish to bevel at. Then set that board next to your blade and bevel to match (remember to release the bevel lock first ).

                    Dave

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by workboy:
                      I have questions on the setup also.
                      I just assembled the table saw but want to confirm the setscrews' alignments. For the 90 degree setscrew. It appears that once you adjusted the squareness and try to tighten the setscrew, the blade will tilt a little bit. Does anyone have this problem too?
                      <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
                      See Dave Arbuckle's post above, thanks Dave.
                      <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>
                      Also, the front tru-union was very difficult to move. Unlike the rear one, it doesn't even appeared to be moving at all.
                      <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
                      The front trunion will not move due to the fact that the carriage is caught between the 90ยบ bevel adjustment screw and the bevel crank rod. To move it, loosen all the trunion bolts and lock the bevel lock. Turn the bevel crank clockwise and the trunion will move right over.

                      Jake

                      Jake


                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The first thing I would get is a Master Gage. You can find one at http://www.mastergage.com/
                        The super bar is what you want. Trying to accurately adjust that fence on this saw or any other table saw is an impossibility without one. I made my own as I worked in the machining industry for many years and already had one. I set my fence to toe out .005 thou and can rip four foot boards dead on the money thanks to the indicator.
                        Tip two: Don't put the extensions on with the Table Saw upside down on the ground. Only and Olympic weight lifter can pick that thing up after installation. Have a neighbor or a wino that you can hire cheap, hold the things in position while the saw is upright. Put in the two outside screws and tighten them partially. You can then use a rubber mallet to align the extensions with the table. My TS2424 was perfect on the left extensions. The right extension was bowed just slightly. Not enough to worry about. Castings "move", as does all precision machinery parts.
                        Tip 3: This should be tip one. Prior to adjusting fence, blade, etc., level the saw where you will be using it. I'm surprised this isn't pointed out in the manual. No machine will cut to it's maximum capabilities unless it is leveled. Standard operating proceedure in the machine shop industry. Level it in two directions as close as you can get it with a level of known accuracy! Believe me. An unlevel machine will not allow accurate setup of the other components on the saw.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Rob Patterson:
                          ... My TS2424 was perfect on the left extensions. The right extension was bowed just slightly. Not enough to worry about. Castings "move", as does all precision machinery parts.
                          <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                          I just purchased a TS2424 too. My first table saw. I am not a pro woodworker. Just your average (well-- above average) do-it-yourself-kinda-guy. During the setup, I too noticed that my extensions were somewhat bowed (ever so slightly). At the top of the extensions, the front of the extensions are perfectly flush with the front of the main table top. However, at the back of the top, the extensions are both about 1/32 inch low compared to the main table top.

                          But both front and rear faces (the surface that the rails mount to) of the extensions are perfectly flush with the front and rear faces of the main table top. You can not even feel the joint between them. I seem to have been able to properly align everything. I didn't even have to use the shims on the rear rail. So I guess that the fact that the extensions are a hair low on the back side isn't a problem.

                          Is it?
                          George

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi everyone
                            I two have just recently purchased a new TS2424-1 and a TP1300. I am an extreme novice at this time. If my wife is right ( as always) I will wear out the books and practice alot until I become just a novice. From what I have seen (doing alot of research )I beleive that this is a good choice and look forward to practicing this week-end. If anyone has any suggestion or ideas on how I can be proficient please post or e-mail me. I read above a reply that said to make several Jigs first. Where can I found which ones to make and how to make them?

                            The finest sawdust in the land comes from my hands

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