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new WD12450 Wet/Dry vac vs. old design ...

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  • new WD12450 Wet/Dry vac vs. old design ...

    I've just bought a new 12 Gallon Ridgid Wet Dry vac and comparing it to my existing '92 vintage 12 Gallon (Emerson made and still runs great) Craftsman I like all the changes & improvements you have made !! Including ...
    * 1-13/16" shorter (same can dia. & height, 1" is due to the new foot design, balance is in the motor/top assembly)
    * 4 Db quieter (88-90/90-92 Db "old" vs. 84-86/86-88 Db "new" @ 3.5 ft. first numbers are w/muffler, second are without)
    * same amp draw (10A)
    * same suction (performed a primative test using a car vacuum test gauge, both pulled 3.4-3.5" Hg)
    * 2 added accessory storage spots in lid.
    * Tug-A-Long Hose (with swivels on both ends).
    * Drain port now even with tank bottom.
    * Same basic motor design, yet brushes look to be more accessable / easier to service.
    * Motor cooling fan exhaust is baffled to reduce noise.

    I want you to know that I did some serious comparison shopping and read all the reviews before deciding I wanted to stick with an Emerson made machine. I was very cautious of the new design Craftsman vac (Shop-Vac made ??) and decided I just did not like them (exactly what you want to hear !!). I do still like their newer swatty 16 Gallon one (still Emerson and HD has a Ridgid equiv.), but did not want one that big.

    Anyway, good job on the redesign !!

    Doug

  • #2
    I use a Ridgid vac at work (the one with te handle and large rear wheels) and a Shop Vac at home. While I like the Ridgid's power and design better, I think the shopvac is better for the woodworker. Why??? My shop vac has an internal stub that mates with the drywall dust bags that they sell. (ridgid does not havethe internal stub for these bags.) I use them in the shop and get a lot of suction, even after cleaning up pile of wood shavings. I tried that once with the ridgid and the filter clogged in no time at all.

    If Ridgid would add the stub on the inside to accomodate filter bags, I'd head over to HD and buy another.

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    • #3
      I have the shopvac too and like using bags with it. It's especially nice when cleaning up in the shop or doing drywall with a dustless sander. They make cleanup so much easier.

      [ 01-13-2003, 12:35 PM: Message edited by: J Reed ]

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      • #4
        On my '92 vintage Emerson-made Craftsman vac, I made an adapter so I could use it with the Shop-Vac Drywall Dust Bags ... I used a White PVC 1-1/2" 45Deg M-FM (Street) Elbow and added a rubber gasket on the male end that slips into the end of the hose, and the flanged female end fits into the bag opening (two nibs protruding from elbow retain the bag). Since this is not a zero-leak connection, I use it in conjunction with a CleanStream filter element.

        The new design Ridgid has a different inlet arrangement and with the larger i.d. Tug-A-LOng hose my existing adapter will not work. Back into my assortment of PVC, I've found that a 1-1/2" 90Deg FM-M (Street) Elbow combined with a 45Deg FM-FM Elbow will work. The larger FM diameter end of the Street elbow just barely fits into the hose end (pointing down), and the 45Deg elbow follows the same curve pointing back at the tank wall. The bag goes on backwards (with inlet toward the middle), and the two similar nibs will keep the bag on. This looks like it will work but I need to try it out. Only concern is there is more elbow there for stuff to get caught in. But if you are just using it for drywall dust, this should not be an issue.

        Doug

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        • #5
          That would be a nice and easy solution if it works. I would be apprehensive though that too much airflow may be cut out since you're going from 2 or 2 1/2" inlet to 1 1/5" and putting in all the angles.

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          • #6
            That would be a nice and easy solution if it works. I would be apprehensive though that too much airflow may be cut out since you're going from 2 or 2 1/2" inlet to 1 1/5" and putting in all the angles.

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            • #7
              The actual i.d. of the PVC is 1.58" and stays prety smooth & radius is consistant throughout the 135Deg turn of the 2 pc. (as I plan to use for the new design WD12450).

              The i.d. of the 2.5" Tug-A-Long hose end is 2.290", attachment end i.d. is 2.080" and the nominal hose i.d. looks to be slightly smaller yet.

              Having this PVC in there reduces the air flow path down to 57% of the original area (2.08 vs. 1.58"). I would definitely be concerned with larger debris getting trapped in this restriction, but that is why I only use it for drywall dust.

              For normal clean-up, I just run the simple to clean and almost infinitely re-useable CleanStream.

              Doug

              [ 01-13-2003, 04:38 PM: Message edited by: dougmac ]

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              • #8
                Let's say the smallest inside diameter of the stock unit is 2". Given that you are going from 2" to 1.58" you are still making a significant drop.

                Area = pi x r^2

                2" pipe area = 3.14 in^2
                1.58" pipe area = 1.96 in^2

                That's a 37.6% reduction in area without considering the bends. That'll put a bit of strain on the motor.

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                • #9
                  Mike3206 I agree!!!!
                  I have suggested your idea to a Ridgid product rep and you would have thought I had lost my mind. I have also voiced this complaint twice on this forum under different threads and was met with silence.

                  My son in law is a general contractor and at times I help him (possibly hinder [img]redface.gif[/img] ). He has a Ridgid 16 gallon wet dry vac and I was cleaning up after the dry wall. I would vac for about 5-10 minutes then clean the filter. Finally a sub on the job took pity on me and brought in his shop vac with a dry wall bag. Wow! What a difference.
                  I have since tried rubber banding a filter bag arund the filter, that works and makes cleaning the filter easier but it still requires attention to much.
                  I wish Ridgid would develop some way to vac fine dust and catch it saving having to clean the filter so often.

                  Picking up wood shavings and general clean up I don't think the ridgid can be beat. But when it comes to fine dust, such as dry wall dust forget it, the Shop Vac is far superior.
                  Rev Ed

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                  • #10
                    I honestly feel that the "airflow restriction" of my homemade dust-bag adapter is not that big of a deal as far as "adding too much strain on the motor".

                    As an example, the optional RIDGID Exhaust Muffler reduces the air flow dia. down to just under 1.5" and looks like the outer ring may actually draw air in / adding to airstream like a venturi. This would theroretically add just as much / if not more strain on the motor than my 1.58" I.D. PVC bag adapter !!

                    Doug

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                    • #11
                      Hello, I am a design student from Auburn University. We are currently working with Emerson tool company (the makers of Ridgid wet/dry vacs) in redesigning the vac. I stumbled upon this forum to look for research on what users commonly find wrong with current models. So far the information I have received on this one topic has been invaluable. Thank you. I ask you to please list additional problems you have with user functions. Any additional ideas on improving existing wet/dry vacs would also be very welcomed. Either reply on this post or feel free to email me at - carsode@auburn.edu.

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