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Wiring 4511 for 220v

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  • Wiring 4511 for 220v

    The power cord that comes with the saw seems adequate, but i'm no electrician. Should I use a heavier gauge cord?

    On a side note the manual states "only install the dust chute when using a 4" dust collection system. failure to heed this warning result in serious personal injury or death..."

    Is my dust chute going to murder me?

  • #2
    Re: Wiring 4511 for 220v

    safest thing to do is to use a 220v outlet with mating plug. that way, no one's going to plug a 110v appliance into an outlet that's been wired for 220v thereby frying the 110v appliance. it would also prevent the 220v appliance from being plugged into a 110v outlet with all the potentially negative implications of that mistake.
    there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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    • #3
      Re: Wiring 4511 for 220v

      Originally posted by bublin254 View Post
      Is my dust chute going to murder me?
      Yes... Yes it is...

      You see...

      It's watching you...

      Waiting...

      Plotting your demise...

      That and if your cabinet fills with saw dust it'll fubar your motor.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Wiring 4511 for 220v

        You need to use a dedicated 220 Volts single phase outlet and a 4 prongs plugs.
        The cord gauge would plenty if you wanted to reuse it, as the amperage in 220Volts is one half of in110 volts but a 110 volts cord has only 3 conductors but you need 4 conductor for 220Volts,which means that you have to replace the cord.
        Some people believe that they will get more power running 220Volts, this is not true. The horse-power remains the same.
        This would be different if you could run 3 phases but the motor on the saw will not accept 3 phases.
        I hope this help.
        Bert

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        • #5
          Re: Wiring 4511 for 220v

          Would you mind explaining to me why you need 4 wires? Where are you going to terminate the neutral,if u were to wire this motor with 220v?

          I'm soo confused!!

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          • #6
            Re: Wiring 4511 for 220v

            You don't need no 4 wire cords for 220. Use regular 2 hots + neutral. Or simply run it on a 20amp circuit @110. Same difference in my experience.
            In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

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            • #7
              Re: Wiring 4511 for 220v

              3 wire cord and outlet on my 220v...2 hots and neutral. The stock cord is fine but you should replace the plug with one that'll mate to a 220v outlet.

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              • #8
                Re: Wiring 4511 for 220v

                In Utah the code is: two hot, one neutral and one ground= 4 conductors
                Three prongs outlets are now no longer up to code.
                Bert

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                • #9
                  Re: Wiring 4511 for 220v

                  Originally posted by b2rtch View Post
                  In Utah the code is: two hot, one neutral and one ground= 4 conductors
                  Three prongs outlets are now no longer up to code.
                  Bert
                  Bert,

                  Is this an added restriction to the NEC? Last time I checked, the NEC provided that you needed 4-wire if you have a device that is essentially mixed 110V/220V. Some appliances use 220V for the main device (typically some sort of resistive or motor load) and then 110V for some auxiliary circuit (control electronics, clocks, etc.). I believe that the NEC provides that if the load is simply a motor load (as it is in the case of the saw), two hots and a ground sized sufficiently is acceptable.

                  Essentially, the two "hot" conductors in a 220V work as a "hot"/neutral analog to a 110V circuit. If there were an additional 110V circuit in the device, then a neutral would be required to create a circuit at that voltage between one "hot" and the neutral. In both cases the ground conductor acts in the same way (a low impedance conductor to carry faulted or leaking current when something isn't properly functioning).

                  In the basic motor case, a hot should be connected to each side of the motor, then the ground connected to the proper grounding point on the device. There is no where to connect the neutral.

                  The neutral and ground shouldn't be connected together (all we get is two parallel ground runs). In fact, if the ground and neutral are connected together at the device and it is fed from a properly wired sub-panel, a connection is now created between neutral and ground at the sub-panel and the ground can become a normal current-carrying conductor.

                  Don

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                  • #10
                    Re: Wiring 4511 for 220v

                    I added a 100Amp circuit from the meter to my garage about 18 months ago.
                    I also added one 200V circuit with two outlets.
                    I had to put 4 prongs outlets to get the permit.

                    Same thing this year, I added a 100 Amps circuit to the upper floor of my house with 220V for the electric heater and for the electric range, I had to install 4 prongs outlets.
                    At least where I live 3 prongs outlets for 220 V are illegal, not up to code.
                    Bert

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                    • #11
                      Re: Wiring 4511 for 220v

                      Originally posted by b2rtch View Post
                      In Utah the code is: two hot, one neutral and one ground= 4 conductors
                      Three prongs outlets are now no longer up to code.
                      Bert,

                      Utah is unique in a few things
                      bublin254 doesn't appear to be in Utah.

                      I installed a subpanel in my garage. Inspected and passed. Not a single 4 wire of anything for my 220v lines.
                      In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

                      Comment

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