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  • To build, to move or to give up

    As I write somewhere else I am presently debating if I should sale my house and buy one with an existing shop, or build a shop in my back yard or give up wood working altogether.
    I ma presently working in a small two cars garages and this is really very inconvenient.
    I have a large back yard but to build in Taylorsville Utah ( because of the local restrictions) is a nightmare and I am not sure to I can recover the money I spend to build the shop when I sale(if that happen).
    I would have to borrow most of the money.
    I am sure that I am not the only one who went trough such dilemma.
    What is your input?
    Anything I have to be especially careful about?
    Thank you.
    Bert

  • #2
    Re: To build, to move or to give up

    I think you should try to work in your 2-car garage. I only have half of a 2-car garage to do woodworking. Every time I do something, it takes about 45 minutes to set up shop. I wish I have the garage all to myself, but that would not be in the spirit of sharing. Now, if your woodworking is your livelihood, then it might be another story altogether.

    My $0.02.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: To build, to move or to give up

      Are you married?

      "Honey, we have to move so I can have a bigger shop" might get interesting.

      "Honey, we need to get into (more) debt so I can have a bigger shop" equally so.

      "Honey, I need to give up woodworking, my hobby has become frustrating because my shop is too small. Henceforth, I will be spending the time I used to spend in the shop bugging you". Guaranteed success!

      Reminds me of:

      A biker was riding along a California beach when suddenly the sky clouded above his head and, in a booming voice, the Lord said, "Because you have TRIED to be faithful to me in all ways, I will grant you one wish." The biker pulled over and said, "Build a bridge to Hawaii so I can ride over anytime I want."


      The Lord said, "Your request is materialistic. Think of the enormous challenges for that kind of undertaking. The supports required to reach the bottom of the Pacific! The concrete and steel it would take! It will nearly exhaust several natural resources. I can do it, but it is hard for Me to justify your desire for worldly things. Take a little more time and think of something that could possibly help mankind."


      The biker thought about it for a long time Finally he said, "Lord, I wish that I and all men could understand our wives. I want to know how she feels inside, what she's thinking when she gives me the silent treatment, why she cries, what she means when she says nothing's wrong, and how I can make a woman truly happy."


      The Lord replied, "You want two lanes or four on that bridge?."

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: To build, to move or to give up

        In fact interestingly enough my wife is the one who encourage me to buy more and better tools and to build a shop or to move.
        She asked me " what do you want for your birthday" I replied nothing ( I never want anything.
        She insisted, I said "I could use some wood chisels".
        She went to Wooodcraft and she bought me for $150.00 of chisels".
        I would have bough mine at HF.
        She wants me to build a large shop, I am the one hesitating.
        I am sure you wished you had such a wife, no?
        Bert

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: To build, to move or to give up

          " if your woodworking is your livelihood"
          I used to be cabinet maker in France.
          I shall retire within 10 years or less and I am thinking about starting a small wood working business again (mostly for the church and for people who cannot afford to pay someone to do the job they need, not to become rich).
          Today I have decent income, then I shall have a mediocre income at best, if I want to build or move the time is now, not when I am retired.
          Bert

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: To build, to move or to give up

            Sounds like a lovely wife.

            I can't complain about mine either. I asked for a dovetail jig for Christmas. She went to HD and asked the tool guys, and they got her the Porter Cable, and they don't normally carry it. I love her. (not just because she lets me buy tools either!)

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: To build, to move or to give up

              Originally posted by b2rtch View Post
              I shall retire within 10 years or less and I am thinking about starting a small wood working business again (mostly for the church and for people who cannot afford to pay someone to do the job they need, not to become rich).
              Bert
              That's a noble idea. I wish you will be able to realize this dream. My practical side has already come up with a few reasons that your idea might prove difficult to materialized. Still, I'd love to see you succeed!

              Your wife is a very nice person from what you said. If you have her support, then perhaps building a dedicated shop would be nice, assuming you want to remain a member of your current community for a long time. If where you live is not where you want to retire, perhaps a move might make sense. This is overly simplistic since Life is much more complicated.

              Personally, I want a large dedicated wood shop, but for now I find lots of joy in maneuvering in my small space.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: To build, to move or to give up

                Originally posted by b2rtch View Post
                As I write somewhere else I am presently debating if I should sale my house and buy one with an existing shop, or build a shop in my back yard or give up wood working altogether.
                I ma presently working in a small two cars garages and this is really very inconvenient.
                I have a large back yard but to build in Taylorsville Utah ( because of the local restrictions) is a nightmare and I am not sure to I can recover the money I spend to build the shop when I sale(if that happen).
                I would have to borrow most of the money.
                I am sure that I am not the only one who went trough such dilemma.
                What is your input?
                Anything I have to be especially careful about?
                Thank you.
                Bert
                Consider this from someone who for years did with just the minimal basics, am now retired, and having done so, have "moved up" to working in the 2 car garage (cars sit outside):

                1, If you are Seriously considering giving it up, you really don't have a passion for wood-working. Your post strikes me as someone who feels they "could" have a passion for it if it wasn't so inconvenient to do. Bottom line, It's a hobby.

                That said, I would definitely not borrow money on a "might be" situation or to support a hobby. When your financial situation allows you to splurge on it, go for it, but until then, take care of business.

                That also means you don't move to a place with a shop unless there are a lot of other benefits to the move, or you can pay for the new one with the sale of the old one. If/when you have to move for other reasons, a shop space should definitely be in the decision making process of what you buy. You may or may not end up with one initially, but zoning, etc requirements for future building are something to consider when making the decision. Who knows, by that time crime statistics/taxes, etc may encourage the wife to consider moving out of the city limits.

                2. Evaluate what you want out of woodworking.

                Is your goal to make cabinets, furniture, etc cheaper than you can buy it?. Not gonna happen unless you have an inside track on materials. To do it quickly and efficiently is going to take a bunch of bucks on machinery. Again, there goes the "savings".

                Is it because you really enjoy making something out of the raw materials? If so, you are screwed, dude! Not really, but heaven may have to wait.

                As with everything else, woodworking is a time vs money situation. If you are currently working a full-time job, you don't have the time to do what you want with what resources you have, and you already have stated that you don't have the resources to do what you want. Either you have to get more resources (more $$) or wait until you have more time (retirement).

                Unless you are exceptionally talented/artistic, and willing to gamble everything on your ability, do not even think about trying to make money at it.

                Sorry to put a downer on this, but sometimes you can't have everything you want right now, despite what the internet pundits may tell you. Unless you are wrong about a shop at your current location adding enough value to make it worthwhile, sounds to me like you will just have to gut it out.

                To do this, consider dropping the time requirements on what you want to do. Work at it as you can with what you have, and the end result will be just as enjoyable. That also means downsizing the projects to fit within your means. I first thought that bigger/better tools would make me happy. I have found more joy with using hand tools, albeit the pace still gets me frustrated at times, but it is within my means. When it comes to wood working, throw the time line out the window and just enjoy the journey.

                Makes for many more peaceful restful nights sleeping

                JMTCW

                Go
                Last edited by Gofor; 01-11-2010, 11:02 PM.
                Practicing at practical wood working

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: To build, to move or to give up

                  Thank you all for your replies.
                  Bert

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: To build, to move or to give up

                    Originally posted by vnh View Post
                    That's a noble idea. I wish you will be able to realize this dream. My practical side has already come up with a few reasons that your idea might prove difficult to materialized. Still, I'd love to see you succeed!

                    Your wife is a very nice person from what you said. If you have her support, then perhaps building a dedicated shop would be nice, assuming you want to remain a member of your current community for a long time. If where you live is not where you want to retire, perhaps a move might make sense. This is overly simplistic since Life is much more complicated.

                    Personally, I want a large dedicated wood shop, but for now I find lots of joy in maneuvering in my small space.

                    God only knows where I shall retire and die!
                    So far I worked and lived in 26 countries and just in the USA I lived in 5 states!
                    If I could do absolutely what I want Salt Lake City Utah,is not the place I would choose to live or to retire ( I am not Mormon) but if God tells me stay here, I will be perfectly happy to stay here.
                    My dream would be to return to Africa or North Africa or Israel.
                    Bert

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: To build, to move or to give up

                      [QUOTE=Gofor;273522]Consider this from someone who for years did with just the minimal basics, am now retired, and having done so, have "moved up" to working in the 2 car garage (cars sit outside):

                      1, If you are Seriously considering giving it up, you really don't have a passion for wood-working. Your post strikes me as someone who feels they "could" have a passion for it if it wasn't so inconvenient to do. Bottom line, It's a hobby.

                      That said, I would definitely not borrow money on a "might be" situation or to support a hobby. When your financial situation allows you to splurge on it, go for it, but until then, take care of business.

                      That also means you don't move to a place with a shop unless there are a lot of other benefits to the move, or you can pay for the new one with the sale of the old one. If/when you have to move for other reasons, a shop space should definitely be in the decision making process of what you buy. You may or may not end up with one initially, but zoning, etc requirements for future building are something to consider when making the decision. Who knows, by that time crime statistics/taxes, etc may encourage the wife to consider moving out of the city limits.

                      2. Evaluate what you want out of woodworking.

                      Is your goal to make cabinets, furniture, etc cheaper than you can buy it?. Not gonna happen unless you have an inside track on materials. To do it quickly and efficiently is going to take a bunch of bucks on machinery. Again, there goes the "savings".

                      Is it because you really enjoy making something out of the raw materials? If so, you are screwed, dude! Not really, but heaven may have to wait.

                      As with everything else, woodworking is a time vs money situation. If you are currently working a full-time job, you don't have the time to do what you want with what resources you have, and you already have stated that you don't have the resources to do what you want. Either you have to get more resources (more $$) or wait until you have more time (retirement).

                      Unless you are exceptionally talented/artistic, and willing to gamble everything on your ability, do not even think about trying to make money at it.

                      Sorry to put a downer on this, but sometimes you can't have everything you want right now, despite what the internet pundits may tell you. Unless you are wrong about a shop at your current location adding enough value to make it worthwhile, sounds to me like you will just have to gut it out.

                      To do this, consider dropping the time requirements on what you want to do. Work at it as you can with what you have, and the end result will be just as enjoyable. That also means downsizing the projects to fit within your means. I first thought that bigger/better tools would make me happy. I have found more joy with using hand tools, albeit the pace still gets me frustrated at times, but it is within my means. When it comes to wood working, throw the time line out the window and just enjoy the journey.

                      Makes for many more peaceful restful nights sleeping

                      JMTCW

                      My main frustration withe current situation is to have to put one tool away so that I can use the other one, to have ot pack everything so taht we can get the cars in.
                      I know I can live with it but it is frustrating.
                      I do not pretend to make money doing woodworking, just having a good time and help someone else if I can.
                      Thanks God, I am making a very good living and if really want I can find the money to build the shop, I just am not sure that this a good investment versus buying something already built.
                      I have all my tools in France from the time I had my business as cabinet maker, I have a 5 in 1 operation machine. I wish I could ship it here, unfortunately shipping it and converting it to work on the power here is cost prohibitive.
                      I have a friend of mine who is realtor coming this Saturday to explore my options with me.
                      Bert

                      Bert
                      Last edited by b2rtch; 01-12-2010, 06:06 PM.

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