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  • Dado depth and how tight?

    Greetings all,

    I'm new to the forum and relatively new to my TS2442 although I have owned it for 2 years. I am building some simple bookshelves from oak plywood and my questions are:

    How deep should the dado be? I'm thinking 1/4-3/8 but I would love to hear what you all think.

    Also, how tight should the joint be? I have a Freud Super Dado. The 3/4 set-up was way too loose. With the chipper for undersized plywood I need to really hammer the pieces together (scrap of course). Should I really want a joint that tight?

    I am going to try a shim tonight and see what happens.

    Thanks in advance for your opinions. I really need your help as my wife is going to hammer me if I don't finish those bookshelves )

    Best regards,

    Henry

  • #2
    OK - I got out there (the garage and it's 32 degrees in Michigan) and tried out the shims.

    WOW! what a difference. Now the joint is tight but I can bang it on with my hand. Still need a hammer to get it of though. I think this is the right tightness.

    Bad news is the other end of the shelf is a little thicker. Looks like another shim for the other side. Is this typical that plywood varies from end to end?

    Best regards,

    Henry

    Comment


    • #3
      Two issues: the general practice, so far as I am aware, is that if the side piece is 3/4 plywood, the dado should be 3/8 deep. As for the width, we all know that 3/4 ply isn't 3/4 of an inch thick. My experience is that it is a good idea actually to gauge the sheet I'm using. On the other hand, for good face grade plywood, I've found the thickness pretty uniform across the sheet. Could your shelf be warped?

      Comment


      • #4
        Sure sounds like the plywood the home centers sell around Dallas. I chuckle when someone suggests getting one of those deliberately undersized router "plywood" bits, like a 23/32" to fit 3/4" nominal. Not around here it won't... As well, if it was stored where there was moisture present, bingo, swelled. If that thick part is the factory corner, that would be my first bet.

        However, in good stuff, I agree with RGad. Part of my definition of "good stuff" would be that it is constant in thickness.

        If you could loosen it just one-half of a hair... I've made a couple tight joints with plywood and had a ghastly time of fitting it up with glue on. The moisture in the glue swells it ever so little, but perhaps enough to turn a "smack of the hand" joint into a "beat it with a mallet" one.

        And, about half the thickness is what I use for depth, too.

        Dave

        Comment


        • #5
          You should test your set up on scrap pieces or mic your dado before dadoing your finisned piece. Saves bucks when your screw up a set up.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for your suggestions, they are a lot of help. I bought a caliper and found out that one end of the sheet was slightly thinner at one end. So how should I set up my dado? Should it be the same as the thickness of the sheet or slightly thinner or thicker?

            Best regards,

            Henry

            Comment


            • #7
              Henry,

              I just ordered a Freud 6" from Amazon and it will arrive tomorrow. I will give it a try and see if I can be of some help. I have heard good things about the Freud though.

              - Jamie

              Comment


              • #8
                I have the 6" Dado from Freud, and I made a CD holder for my daughter this weekend (her birthday present). It turned out great. i see the mistakes I made and made note of them so I won't repeat HA, HA In my opinion its a good investment [img]smile.gif[/img]
                Semper Fi <BR>Chuck<BR>USMC 66-70

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