Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
assembling 4511 today want to get a better blade Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • assembling 4511 today want to get a better blade

    Any recomendations on a real nice blade to use with 4511. Ripping cedar need a clean cut

    Gary

  • #2
    Re: assembling 4511 today want to get a better blade

    Assuming high quality, if all else is equal, more teeth means a cleaner cut, but cleaner cut doesn't come without a downside, and cleaner doesn't always equate to "better". It really depends on what you're doing and what you want to achieve. More teeth pose higher resistance to the saw (slower feedrate, more bogging), and more chance of burning to occur, so you're more limited with the thickness of the material with 80T than with 40T. Fewer teeth tends to mean rougher cut but easier feedrate less bogging. The 40T to 50T range is a good compromise for good ripping efficiency and acceptably clean crosscuts...they're good at many things, but excellent at none. They're limitations tend to come in the extreme ranges of thick ripping and ultra fine crosscuts, where a 24T-30T ripper and a 60T to 80T crosscut blade each excel respectively. If you're going to be ripping a lot of 1.5" to 2" material, you should really get a dedicated ripping blade with 24 to 30 teeth.

    You don't need to spend a fortune on a blade, but the higher price blades tend to improve your odds of getting a good one. Your saw will benefit from a good thin kerf blade (TK). Blades like the Infinity Combomax Lite (010-150), DeWalt DW7150PT, CMT P10050 (256.050.10/216.050.10), Ridgid Titanium R1050C, or Freud LU83R010 are all good quality 50T combo blades at reasonable prices ($40-$70)...the Infinity happens to be the best of those that I've tried. The Forrest WWII and Ridge Carbide TS2000 are excellent 40T choices that both come in a TK, but tend to run in the $90-$100 range. The WWII actually comes in an outstanding 30T configuration that'll rip more efficiently than the 40T or 50T blades, and still gives acceptable crosscuts for most situations.

    If your material is really thick and you plan to cut lots of it, look into a bulk rip blade like the Infinity 010-124, Freud LU87R010, DeWalt DW7124PT...$40-$50.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: assembling 4511 today want to get a better blade

      Will never buy anthing except a Forrest again! Just my 2 cents worth.

      Big G

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: assembling 4511 today want to get a better blade

        If excellent rip cuts is what you need, then get a good rip cut blade.

        You can use a Jack-of-All Trades combo blade that will deliver acceptable results or you can use quality blade designed to do one thing, but but that one thing exceptionally well.

        I have a few nice Freud blades. One cross cut, one rip and one combo. The project will dictate whether I want to use dedicated function blades or just leave the combo in.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: assembling 4511 today want to get a better blade

          My 4511 really likes the Forrest WWII blade (thin kerf). Pricey, but extremely smooth cuts.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: assembling 4511 today want to get a better blade

            Originally posted by hewood View Post
            Assuming high quality, if all else is equal, more teeth means a cleaner cut, but cleaner cut doesn't come without a downside, and cleaner doesn't always equate to "better". It really depends on what you're doing and what you want to achieve. More teeth pose higher resistance to the saw (slower feedrate, more bogging), and more chance of burning to occur, so you're more limited with the thickness of the material with 80T than with 40T. Fewer teeth tends to mean rougher cut but easier feedrate less bogging. The 40T to 50T range is a good compromise for good ripping efficiency and acceptably clean crosscuts...they're good at many things, but excellent at none. They're limitations tend to come in the extreme ranges of thick ripping and ultra fine crosscuts, where a 24T-30T ripper and a 60T to 80T crosscut blade each excel respectively. If you're going to be ripping a lot of 1.5" to 2" material, you should really get a dedicated ripping blade with 24 to 30 teeth.

            You don't need to spend a fortune on a blade, but the higher price blades tend to improve your odds of getting a good one. Your saw will benefit from a good thin kerf blade (TK). Blades like the Infinity Combomax Lite (010-150), DeWalt DW7150PT, CMT P10050 (256.050.10/216.050.10), Ridgid Titanium R1050C, or Freud LU83R010 are all good quality 50T combo blades at reasonable prices ($40-$70)...the Infinity happens to be the best of those that I've tried. The Forrest WWII and Ridge Carbide TS2000 are excellent 40T choices that both come in a TK, but tend to run in the $90-$100 range. The WWII actually comes in an outstanding 30T configuration that'll rip more efficiently than the 40T or 50T blades, and still gives acceptable crosscuts for most situations.

            If your material is really thick and you plan to cut lots of it, look into a bulk rip blade like the Infinity 010-124, Freud LU87R010, DeWalt DW7124PT...$40-$50.
            Thanks for the detailed explanation. Most of the riping ill be doing on my
            first project will be 1" cedar. Im going to try the 30 to 50 tooth blade.
            Sure enjoy this site you folks are so helpfull. Still assembling the 4511
            seting on the base in the mornin.Takin my time,want everything to be right.

            Gary

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: assembling 4511 today want to get a better blade

              Gary/Duke58: Curious as to what blade you went with, if you have picked one up, and your thoughts about it. I am in the same boat with a new 4511 that I have so far only played with, but I used it to square a panel on a miter saw stand I built using a beat up old bench saw and if it isn't perfectly square now it is darn close to it.

              I am torn between the 30t and 40t Forrest Woodworker II as I imagine I will not be wanting to change blades.

              I guess the project pretty well dictates the blade, but I cannot imagine that I will often rip anything larger than a 2X and that will be for low quality applications.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: assembling 4511 today want to get a better blade

                Originally posted by Klawman View Post
                Gary/Duke58: Curious as to what blade you went with, if you have picked one up, and your thoughts about it. I am in the same boat with a new 4511 that I have so far only played with, but I used it to square a panel on a miter saw stand I built using a beat up old bench saw and if it isn't perfectly square now it is darn close to it.

                I am torn between the 30t and 40t Forrest Woodworker II as I imagine I will not be wanting to change blades.

                I guess the project pretty well dictates the blade, but I cannot imagine that I will often rip anything larger than a 2X and that will be for low quality applications.
                My 30T WWII TK was among the most versatile blades I've ever used....it'll cut darn near as cleanly as the 40T, but will loaf through materials that will bog the 40T. If you tend to do more plywood and crosscutting, go with the 40T (or higher tooth blade). If you tend to use mainly hardwoods, I'd go with the 30T.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: assembling 4511 today want to get a better blade

                  The Freud glue line rip lives up to its name in my 4511. 1/8" kerf no problem, cleaner edges than my jointer can do.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X