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  • 1/4 inch shank

    I just bought a rigid router (very nice), but with the 1/2 in shanks the cutting part of the bit is too wide for the hole in the bottom plate the rounter slide on when using. Why is this its a very powerfull tools? Is there another bottom plate that will solve the problem? Thanks

  • #2
    Re: 1/4 inch shank

    Lawrence,

    With almost all routers, you can get bits that are bigger than the hole. Most of the really large bits do have 1/2" shafts.

    If you are using a large bit, please understand that many if not most of these are intended for use with the router mounted to a router table ONLY. You are very likely to have a major disaster and severe risk of serious injury if you try to rout with such a bit while guiding the router by hand! When mounting your router to the table, the plastic base is removed and not used, eliminating the problem you're having. If you plan to not use a router table, please make ABSOLUTELY sure your bit is recommended for hand-held use by the bit manufacturer.

    If you're absolutely sure the bit is OK for hand-held use, you can either buy an accessory base (if it's offered for that router - I don't have that brand) or many folks just make one out of phenolic, acrylic, polycarbonate or even a piece of inexpensive masonite. Use the original one as a template for the screw holes. Keep the original! It probably fits standard router bushings, which you will need if you ever get or make a fixture that requires them.

    Again, I don't have the Ridgid router... but it you're using a very large bit, you also MUST be very careful about its speed rating. Routers typically run at 22,000-25,000 rpm. Large bits need to run slower - some must never exceed 10,000 rpm. So to use those, your router needs to be of the variable speed type OR you need to get an external speed control (around 30-50 bucks). Trying to run a large bit at full speed could lead to the bit coming apart which could result in serious or even fatal injury.

    Good luck - be careful - get help if unsure. These things can be very dangerous.

    -Andy
    Last edited by Andy_M; 01-26-2010, 01:52 AM.

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    • #3
      Re: 1/4 inch shank

      I agree with Andy! But are you aware that with the R2900 two-base kit, the router base plates are different and are interchangeable? One baseplate has a hole to fit the P-C style guide bushings and the baseplate has a 2-1/2 inch diameter hole.

      CWS

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      • #4
        Re: 1/4 inch shank

        The rotation speed of the bit also needs to be taken in consideration.
        A large diameter bit must rotate much slower.
        It the router is not equipped with one,buy an electronic speed controller, about $20.00 at Harbor Freight.
        http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=43060
        Bert
        Last edited by b2rtch; 01-26-2010, 08:10 PM.

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        • #5
          Re: 1/4 inch shank

          Originally posted by b2rtch View Post
          The rotation speed of the bit also needs to be taken in consideration.
          A large diameter bit must rotate much slower.
          It the router is not equipped with one,buy an electronic speed controller, about $20.00 at Harbor Freight.
          http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=43060
          Bert
          When it comes to router tables there's is only 1 choice as far as I'm concerned.
          I bought a Pinicle lift with a PC 7518 3 1/4 HP motor. Can change bits from above the table etc. The motor has a slide switch that lets you use whatever speed you need.
          I love this setup.

          Buck

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