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  • Disassembling table saw

    I will be moving homes soon and wanted to know if it was acceptable/wise to disassemble my TS2424 table wings and rails prior to the move. I am concerned about torquing the wings and rails during transport. Perhaps my concern is not valid, but I would like some feedback. My TS is located in a basement, but it is a walkout so the TS could be put on a dolly with some effort, and transported to the truck in that fashion. Suggestions or advice?

  • #2
    I can't advise on the disassembly part, but keep in mind that a short distance move (say, under a day's drive), you will probably be able to monitor how the unit is packed and handled. On one short move they didn't even bother taking legs off the dining room table, or take the Radial Arm Saw off it's base, and I had no damage.

    On a long distance move of my family, the truck was full when it left, but was completely repacked jammed tight, and only 3/4 full when it arrived (a day late), since the trucker had the opportunity to add a small load to ours. Damage from the repacking was high. And on the move where it was repacked, my employer had paid a premium for a "full truck" to presumably give me a predictable delivery time.

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    • #3
      I have disassembled my saw on several occassions, in fact I would not want to risk transporting it without breaking it down. Just make sure you have your assembly manual readily available when you are ready to set it up. It gets easier each time you re-assemble it.
      If it don\'t fit, force it. If it breaks, \'needed fixin\' anyhow. 8{~

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      • #4
        If I was taking it apart anyway, I think I would take advantage of the opportunity to upgrade the fence and rails to the 3612.

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        • #5
          I would definitely do that, Rog, if the machine is going to be professionally moved. Those rails hanging out look a lot like handles to non-woodworkers.

          If you are moving it "yourself", maybe. It will certainly lighten the load, and make the footprint smaller. Remember that it came from Ridgid disassembled.

          Something not mentioned, no matter who moves it I recommend removing the motor. Not only does this lighten it a lot, but anything striking the motor puts a tremendous strain on the insides of the saw. There's a lot of leverage with it hanging way out there.

          Dave

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          • #6
            We do training for Home Depot employees all over the country. All of our products are fully assembled in St.Louis, placed in a rental truck and then shipped all over the country - California, New York, Texas, etc. We never had a problem. Just make sure everything is securely tied down.

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            • #7
              I don't have the time to look up the post, but Jake once posted that while transporting any piece of machinery, take it out of indexing. The vibration against the stops will cause ware. Causing the indexing to become sloppy, and not accurate. (More so for Miter Saws) Take the blade off, tilt it mid way between 90 and 45 degrees, and raise the arbor 50 percent. This puts it in a floating mode, where not ware will occur on the stops or trunnion itself. I would also remove the motor and package it seperately. Quite a bit of bouncing during transportation can take it's toll on the belt and related items as well.
              John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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              • #8
                To Bob D: I agree in your case of putting the saw in your rental truck but when people who are moving or "professional movers" pack a truck the table saw will not be on top or setting with nothing on top of it. If the owner is in control then maybe not on the takedown but otherwise I think I would take the motor, rails, and extensions off for a big move. I just helped a guy unload a 26 ft U-haul that moved from Wiscon. to western NC. He packed well but I would not have liked to have my 3612 under all the stuff.

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                • #9
                  Another reason to tear it down and pack it is that a commercial mover charges not just by the pound, but by the cube (cubic feet)! Also, the movers get paid, even if stuff gets broken. They don't care, and in fact are paid extra not to care.
                  I have moved several times, and I have never broken anything that I have packed, including a transcontinental move. The pros have broken something every time.
                  bdueker is correct, but you may not have the luxury of the truck with a rather limited cargo.
                  If it don\'t fit, force it. If it breaks, \'needed fixin\' anyhow. 8{~

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                  • #10
                    Bob S. That's a good point. I never thought about other things being thrown on top of or jammed around the tools.

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