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220V with the TS2424

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  • 220V with the TS2424

    I am no electrician so I need some help! What are the advantages to running the TS2424 on a 220 circuit? I see in the manual that the motor can be converted to run on 220, but it makes no mention of what you accomplish by doing this. Any help would be appreciated.
    Brad Hatchett<br />brad@hatchettfamily.net

  • #2
    Well, I AM an electrician (among other things...) [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Running the motor on 220v will reduce the current (amperage) required to run the motor. This results in more efficient operation, with less heating of both wiring and motor. As a result, the motor will last longer, particularly if you're working it hard. If you're doing new wiring to an outlet, smaller gauge wire can be used. Usually, I stick with a larger gauge anyway, which combined with the lower current requirement makes for less voltage drop (wasted energy) across the wiring, and more delivered to the motor itself.

    What you WON'T get is more power out of the motor. What you WILL see is faster motor spinup, cooler operation, and longer life.

    If you have a choice, go for 220.

    D.

    Comment


    • #3
      Brad. If you'll check page 8 of your owner's manual it shows you how to wire the motor for 220VAC. If will walk you through all the steps you need to do. If you dont have your manual you can print a copy or just the pages you need at Ridgids home page. I hope this helps.
      Regards Dan
      Dan<br /> <a href=\"http://community.webshots.com/user/pepaw101\" target=\"_blank\">http://community.webshots.com/user/pepaw101</a>

      Comment


      • #4
        Here is a link to the page with the owner's manuals for your saw.

        http://www.ridgidparts.com/wood/stationary/TS2424.phtml

        Josh

        Comment


        • #5
          Dan,

          Thanks for the info. I am planning to drop a couple of 220V outlets in my shop and will definitely dedicate one for the table saw! Appreciate your response.

          brad


          <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dan Case:
          Well, I AM an electrician (among other things...) [img]smile.gif[/img]

          Running the motor on 220v will reduce the current (amperage) required to run the motor. This results in more efficient operation, with less heating of both wiring and motor. As a result, the motor will last longer, particularly if you're working it hard. If you're doing new wiring to an outlet, smaller gauge wire can be used. Usually, I stick with a larger gauge anyway, which combined with the lower current requirement makes for less voltage drop (wasted energy) across the wiring, and more delivered to the motor itself.

          What you WON'T get is more power out of the motor. What you WILL see is faster motor spinup, cooler operation, and longer life.

          If you have a choice, go for 220.

          D.
          <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
          Brad Hatchett<br />brad@hatchettfamily.net

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks Dan (both of you). I couldn't have said it better my self.

            Jake

            Comment


            • #7
              Brad, when you're putting in those outlets, be sure and think through placement and usage. A little time spent on planning and "whatiffing" will pay you back greatly in convenience and usability.

              For example, do your machines get moved around a lot, or do you have the space to enjoy truly "stationary" machines? Be sure to put outlets wherever you need to operate machines on 220. It's OK to put several outlets on the same circuit, since you're probably not going to be running more than 1 or 2 machines simultaneously (unless you have a commercial shop or often have someone else working with you). Make sure you have enough outlets -- you shouldn't have to waste time unplugging and replugging as you move from machine to machine.

              I'm in the process of turning my 2-car garage into a woodworking shop, and I am planning to run one 20-amp 220v circuit and one 20-amp 110v circuit, with outlets all along the wall where my machines will be living -- some fixed in place, and some on mobile stands. I'll basically have an outlet for each machine, with the mobile machines equipped with long enough cords that I can move 'em around as needed. There are some really elegant things that can be done with retractable cord reels and such, but good 'ol hand-coiled rubber SO cable works fine, too.

              BTW, I AM running other circuits as well... [img]smile.gif[/img] ... dedicated circuit for the air compressor, one for the big bench and its multiple outlet strips. I do a lot of electronic and light mechanical work there -- rebuilding old radios, constructing electronic projects, etc. I need a lot of outlets for test gear, battery chargers for the cordless tools, etc. The plugmold strip on the front face of that bench is where I'll probably be powering my handheld electric tools -- though I have a thought in the back of my mind about building a mobile joinery bench with integral outlets and a single cord to the wall... not unlike the machinery.

              Everyone's situation is different, so do what makes best sense for your needs -- AND meets code! [img]smile.gif[/img]

              One last thought while I'm rambling here -- as long as you're putting in 220 outlets, I'd suggest that you put in twist-lok style outlets and equip your machines with mating plugs. It will prevent that "cord falling from the wall at just the wrong time" moments, cords popping from the outlet while you're moving the machine, etc. It's a little more $$, but worth it, IMHO.

              Enjoy the faster spool-ups!

              D.

              Comment


              • #8
                Brad one other thing you may consider is putting weather-proof cover on all your outlets. This will keep saw dust and other flammable material out of them when they are not in use. the are fairly inexpensive and can be found at any electrical supply.
                I agree about the twist lock devices. But I'm not sure about the recoiler unless they are suit to carry the load, I'm a big fan of SO or SJ cord. The SJ cord is a little cheaper than the SO cord and the only difference is that the SO is oil resistant and the SJ is not. But unless you plan on leaving the cord laying in a pool of oil the SJ jacket will do well. BTW I'm an electrician of over 30 years also. So I have had some experience with these items Good luck on the new shop. [img]smile.gif[/img]

                [ 07-27-2001: Message edited by: Billiam ]

                Comment


                • #9
                  Billiam, that's a good point about the outlet covers. The weather-tight type are a bit more expensive, but there is some value in heeping the outlet covered when not in use.

                  The "recoiler" I had in mind is the same type of auto-cord spool that you see on trouble lights. I have a couple of work sites (radio transmitters) where we have both a trouble light and an extension cord on these devices, hanging overhead where we can grab 'em if needed. They basically use SO or SJ cord with a spring-loaded rewind mechanism and sliding contacts on the spool. Not the best for heavy current requirements, but adequate for many applications.

                  Other than being oilproof, there is another big advantage with SO cord over SJ -- it's more flexible and a bit easier to coil and work with. We use a lot of SO cordage because it's flexible and fairly sturdy. I guess the real reason I prefer SO over SJ is that my Dad taught me as a young, budding junior engineer that "real men use SO cord."

                  But, typically SJ is a bit cheaper, and if you're splitting penn9ies, it can make a difference.

                  D.


                  D.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dan Case:
                    Well, I AM an electrician (among other things...) [img]smile.gif[/img]

                    Running the motor on 220v will reduce the current (amperage) required to run the motor. This results in more efficient operation, with less heating of both wiring and motor. As a result, the motor will last longer, particularly if you're working it hard. If you're doing new wiring to an outlet, smaller gauge wire can be used. Usually, I stick with a larger gauge anyway, which combined with the lower current requirement makes for less voltage drop (wasted energy) across the wiring, and more delivered to the motor itself.

                    What you WON'T get is more power out of the motor. What you WILL see is faster motor spinup, cooler operation, and longer life.

                    If you have a choice, go for 220.

                    D.
                    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                    Dan, I am new to the site and to woodworking, in fact I have yet to by my first tool. I am almost sure I will start with a TS Probably the Ridgid T 2424. In planning the wiring for my workshop I like the idea of wiring both 220 and 110 outlets, the outdoor covers and locking conections, but what is SO and SJ.
                    thepapabear<BR>When a bureaucrat has a hammer, everything begins to look like a nail.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Papabear
                      Dan I am not, but. I have been an electrician for roughly thirty some odd years. The answer to SO or SJ cable This is two types of rubber cord that is used in better extension cord or where a fixed connection is prohibited. This come in many sizes. One good thing is the insulation being rubber gives it a high current carrying rate IE: 14/2 cna carry a 20 amo circuit in either if these cords where you would have to use #12 solid copper. This is a simple description. there is more to it than that. Another difference is that SO is rated to lay in oil alday long where SJ is not. That not to say that SJ can not lay in oil its just not designed to for prolong periods of time. I use SJ to make all my extension cords and equipment hook ups. Well enough rattling on I hope this helps and if you would like to know more about it and special application please e-mil me and I'll be glad to tell you more.

                      Always cut straight except when the fingers are in the way.

                      PS
                      Dan has a very good Ideal wiring as much as you can at 220. This reduces the load on the motors and gets the same result also it is less expensive to operate.

                      [ 08-14-2001: Message edited by: Billiam ]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Dan
                        I'm have seen these reel's at your local DIY and autoparts stores. You might want to check the current rating most (but not all) are rated at 15A and I bet your daddy told that young budding Engineer that real men want more power ( 20amp) to play with . I do agree that SO is diffently better, but for my application I'll save a little and use my trusty SJ. An being 6'1" at 325 lbs power lifter I don't to have many tell me that I,m not a real man [img]tongue.gif[/img] [img]tongue.gif[/img]

                        [ 08-14-2001: Message edited by: Billiam ]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Billiam:
                          Papabear
                          Dan I am not, but. I have been an electrician for roughly thirty some odd years. The answer to SO or SJ cable This is two types of rubber cord that is used in better extension cord or where a fixed connection is prohibited. This come in many sizes. One good thing is the insulation being rubber gives it a high current carrying rate IE: 14/2 cna carry a 20 amo circuit in either if these cords where you would have to use #12 solid copper. This is a simple description. there is more to it than that. Another difference is that SO is rated to lay in oil alday long where SJ is not. That not to say that SJ can not lay in oil its just not designed to for prolong periods of time. I use SJ to make all my extension cords and equipment hook ups. Well enough rattling on I hope this helps and if you would like to know more about it and special application please e-mil me and I'll be glad to tell you more.

                          Always cut straight except when the fingers are in the way.

                          PS
                          Dan has a very good Ideal wiring as much as you can at 220. This reduces the load on the motors and gets the same result also it is less expensive to operate.

                          [ 08-14-2001: Message edited by: Billiam ]
                          <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                          To Billiam:
                          From PapaBear:

                          Thanks for the clairifcation. It may take me
                          some time to get started , I think this is going to be a great site and forum. Do you have any advice on how a beginner can learn some things. This is just something I wish to pick up in my later years (MY gray hair is showing). I have moved to Dallas in the last few years and do not know any friends in the hobby.
                          Thanks agaian Billiam. [img]smile.gif[/img]
                          thepapabear<BR>When a bureaucrat has a hammer, everything begins to look like a nail.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            PapaBear, Dallas has a great woodworking club, the North Texas Woodworker's Association. Web site is at http://www.ntwa.org . Next meeting is next Tuesday. Visitors are always welcome.

                            Dave

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              PapaBear
                              I too am new to woodworking. I live in E. TN hat Im doing is checking the local chapter of woodworkers and looking for some evening classes to take. Dave has sent you a good link to start. Yes, I agree this is a good forum. Jake who moderates it from Ridgid allows you to pretty much say what you think good bad or otherwise about Ridgid and other tools. I must admit that I have purchsed a TS2424 and TP1300 . I have need customer service one time and they were extremely respondsive and helpful. Not only did they do what they said but went further. This impressed me and I plan to continue to Ridgid were I can, even if it means a little more cost.
                              Stay in touch

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