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  • Opinions on 3650 stock miter gauge, and miter gauges in general.

    3650 owners, are you happy with the stock miter gauge or did you upgrade?

    I'm a TS newbie, so bear with me here -- how does a better miter gauge affect TS use? Is it relevant if you're making mostly crosscuts, or only if you're doing a lot of molding etc?

    My bargain-basement 2424 also is missing the miter gauge, and I'm trying to decide whether or not to replace it with the standard stock (about $40), a cheapish aftermarket (Incra V57, about $60) or a fancy schmancy aftermarket in the $1-200 range. What does the extra money buy you?

    Thanks very much for any advice or opinions.

    -DustyCat

  • #2
    Dusty
    I got an Incra 1000SE to replace the stock miter gauge on my 2424. Basically it is more accurate on angled cuts, easier to adjust, has a flip stop that allows you to make consistent length cuts, etc. In my opinion worth the money. You might want to check it out.

    http://www.woodpeck.com/miter1000se.html

    [ 12-03-2003, 09:11 AM: Message edited by: DaveM ]

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    • #3
      Hi Dusty-
      In my opinion, you would be better off saving the $40 they would charge you for the 3650 miter gauge and upgrading to a better one.

      I've had my 3650 for about a month (so I'm not an expert by any means) and have found that the 3650 miter gauge is fine for making 45 and 90 degree cuts, but if you plan on making cuts somewhere in between those two that need somewhat high levels of precision, I think it would be worth it to look into an upgrade.

      Hope this helps.

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      • #4
        The 3650 miter is for t-slot and might not fit the 2424.

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        • #5
          So I guess I should really be asking about the stock miter for the 2424...

          I'm leaning towards a cheaper option just because I am a beginner and it's hard for me to imagine doing much beyond 90 and 45 degrees -- if I can do a competant miter joint at 45 degrees then i'm going to feel like a freakin' genius.

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          • #6
            I don't have any experience with the 2424 miter gauge, but I looked online and it is only $30 (without shipping, tax, etc.). Given this price, and that you are mainly concerned with 45 and 90 degree angles, this may be a good option.

            Maybe some of the 2424 owners can give their opinions of the miter gauge. If they aren't too thrilled with it, you could always go with a relatively cheap upgrade like the Incra V27 for $49:
            http://www.woodpeck.com/miterv27.html

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            • #7
              The stock 3650 miter gauge is OK for cutting relatively short and narrow boards. I think this applies to most all stock miter gauges. I made a crosscut sled from shop scrap and it works great.
              Total cost: about 50 cents worth of screws. [img]smile.gif[/img]
              Lorax

              [ 12-03-2003, 11:43 AM: Message edited by: Lorax ]
              Lorax
              "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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              • #8
                Stock miter guages in general are pretty cheap. if you want something with repeatability that is spot on every time, you'll need to spend a $100 or so and buy a decent aftermarket miter guage.

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                • #9
                  Sleds are the way to go for 45 & 90 Degree cuts. Most accurate method. Most shops use this, and it's pretty simple. Kelly Mehler illustrates how to build one on "Mastering your table saw " Also many old WW magazines have blueprints for sleds.

                  Jake

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                  • #10
                    I agree with woodworkerjack about the sled. I certainly would not consider purchasing the standard miter gauge. I first replaced my standard gauge on my old 2424 with an Incra 1000. The Incra is more accurate, but doesn't solve a fundamental problem with a standard miter gauge--limited size on cross-cuts. Furthermore, the Incra has a short miter bar, so if you're cross-cutting a 10"-12" piece, the darn thing comes off the table. The bar needs to be at least 3" longer to cross-cut the wider dimensioned lumber sizes--forget safely cross-cutting anything wider than 12" or so with the Incra 1000. After I made a homemade sled, my Incra went on the rack until I sold it for $40. Evidently, I bought a Dubby cross-cut miter sled for my 2424. This is a great sled. It sells for $179 from in-line industries (www.in-lineindustries.com). I rarely used my homemade sled after I got the Dubby. I recently sold my 2424 and got a used DeWalt 746 with the interated sliding table. The table is not quite as accurate on miters as the Dubby, but is dead-on the 90 degree stuff. I may evidently get another Dubby (the setup makes the Dubby pretty much custom to the partular model of machine), but the sliding table on the DeWalt works well enough for the stuff I do. Sleds (after-market or homemade) are more accurate, more useful, and safer than standard miter gauges.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks everyone for the advice! I've learned that sleds are probably what I need -- however, I can't figure how I can make one without first buying a miter gauge so I can do the crosscutting! Chicken and egg, I guess...

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                      • #12
                        I would look at the dubby cut off sleid http://www.in-lineindustries.com/
                        Andy B.

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                        • #13
                          Andy,
                          You don't need a miter gauge to make a crosscut sled Go to www.diydata.com, type "crosscut sled" in the search box, click on the second link and scroll down to "crosscut sled". Your saw blade and fence have to be perfectly parallel to your miter gauge slots for this to work. This will give you perfect 90 degree crosscuts. Don't know about 45's, I haven't thought that far ahead yet.
                          Are you really only 18 years old? I've got socks older than that! [img]tongue.gif[/img] [img]tongue.gif[/img]

                          [ 12-07-2003, 03:49 AM: Message edited by: Lorax ]
                          Lorax
                          "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                          • #14
                            When searching for plans for a panel cutting jig for my table saw, I found this web page that may be helpful in describing how to build a miter sled for 45 degree angles. The diagram is from Wood magazine and is near the bottom of the page.

                            http://www.thewoodshop.20m.com/howto_crosscut.htm

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                            • #15
                              Lorax,

                              Thanks a bunch -- I'll check it out!

                              -DustyCat

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