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  • Need help about peeling logs

    I am making a coffee table; a yellow birch slab for the top and a stump with roots for the base. I have been peeling the bark off of a three year old dry jackpine stump which was no problem, but the roots are giving me a problem. I am using a drawknife, a pocket knife and carving knives. The roots have a hard woody layer underneath the bark. I am having a hay day trying to get down to the wood. I have been carving this stump for six hours today and only have two roots done. My arm is killing me and had to call it quits. I have tried a grinder, it leaves marks, I tried a high speed rotary rasp and it left marks too. Does anyone have any suggestions or other methods that's easier? Has anyone tried steaming the roots to soften the woody part?
    Rose

    [ 04-22-2005, 12:05 AM: Message edited by: Rose ]
    It's okay to make mistakes, just make them while nobody's looking.

  • #2
    Sounds like a neat idea, Rose. I've never done it but I have a hint of an idea. Why not try wrapping the some of the roots in towels and then soak them with steaming hot water. It should hold the water close for a longer period.
    Later,
    Chiz
    Later,
    Chiz

    Comment


    • #3
      Hello Chiz: It sounds like wrapping the roots with a hot wet towel would be a better idea. I got so fed up with it and my arm ached throughout the next day that I chucked it out the door. LOL. I am going to stick with green stumps, peeling them then letting them dry. I have a friend that works in the forestry business, I am going to ask him if he can use his equipment to pull the stumps out of the ground for me. As for the slabs for the table top, they will have to sit for months to dry out before I can work with them. Thanks for the tip.
      Rose
      It's okay to make mistakes, just make them while nobody's looking.

      Comment


      • #4
        Rose, have you tried using a beltsander? After I peel the logs with a drawknife, I usually us a pocket knife to get bark out of the little indentations on the log and then use a beltsander to get the rest. Its always worked well for me. Good luck.

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        • #5
          Oh, I forgot, I try to use as much green wood as I can. Its much easier to debark and then I let it sit around the shop and dry before I use it for furniture. I have wood thats been sitting around for several years that I need to use, but thats another story. Again, good luck.

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          • #6
            Thanks. I have used a flap wheel for sanding around the knots and removing the burs. A belt sander is too big to get around the roots. I have tried the flap wheel around the roots and it wasn't doing a good job on the thick woody part. As for the logs, I have decided to work with white cedar and tamarack as they peel very nicely and very little effort is needed. Aspen isn't bad to work with either. Black ash is harder to peel and I need to use the drawknife. I haven't tried peeling a green pine or a soft maple yet. We don't have many hardwoods in our area except for white and yellow birch. Has anyone made log furniture with tamarack? Is it nice to work with? I haven't been able to find much on tamarack the net, except for tamarack flooring, outdoor furniture, fence post and poles.
            Rose
            It's okay to make mistakes, just make them while nobody's looking.

            Comment


            • #7
              The woods that I use in my area are Red Cedar, Yellow Pine, Maple and what some call Ironwood. All peel pretty easily, especially when green.

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              • #8
                I would love to get my hands on red cedar. You are so lucky to have it in your area. That red cedar is an awesome looking wood and it smells so nice. The nearest red cedar tree is a few provinces away from me in British Columbia. It would cost me a fortune to buy pieces for a project. It's just as expensive as buying exotic wood.
                Rose
                It's okay to make mistakes, just make them while nobody's looking.

                Comment

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