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Router in a table questions

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  • Router in a table questions

    1. I have my router mounted in the router table which is on my table saw. With the bits that have the bearings what is the correct way to use the bit with the router table? Is it with using the fence and the bearing, freehand which seems kind of dangerous- or is that what the post is for that came with the router table, or taking the bearing off and using the just the fence?

    2. The second part of this is what is the best way to do about 2 inches around the corner after doing the long side. I have a piece that is 28 inches long and about 1.75 inches wide and I am using a 5/16 ogee bit.

    3. Or is this better to do with the piece clamped down and moving the router over it?

    4. Also my 3650 miter is really tight in the mulecab slot so it there a better miter to use with this.

    5. I really have to get a router lift. Has anyone used the cheaper ($129) Woodpecker lifts that are for the plunge routers like my Makita 3612?

    6. Most of these scenarios don't seem safe especially afer the first time I tried this and the router got ahold of the piece and shot it about 15 feet.

    thanks
    Gary

  • #2
    1. "With the bits that have the bearings what is the correct way to use the bit with the router table?

    Doesn't really matter if the bearing stays in when using the fence. Needs to be in if you are using the table free hand. The pin is called a starter pin to allow you to safely move the work piece onto the bit when working freehand. I don't think I can adequately describe in words how to use this pin. I've used it, but not often. Maybe someone else on the forum can. It's best to see how it's done. You should consider investing in a book like "Working with Routers" from Taunton Press. There's times when you would want to remove a bearing while using the fence. For example, if you were plunging down on a straight cutting bit and using the fence to guide the work piece to make a stop groove.

    2. "what is the best way to do about 2 inches around the corner after doing the long side."

    There's a lot of ways to do most things. I think the best is hold the work in my miter gage and using the fence to guide the piece into the bit. Cut the profile in the end first with a sacrificial piece of wood behind the work piece. That way there is no tear-out. Then cut the profile in the length.

    4. "my 3650 miter is really tight in the mulecab slot so it there a better miter to use with this."

    There are hundreds of better miter gauges then that one.
    Jessem Tool Company make a really nice one for router tables called the Mite R Slide that does not rely on the slot in the router table.

    http://www.jessem.com

    I like all the Jessem products, they're really uncompromising quality.

    5. "I really have to get a router lift. "

    The 3612 is new to me so I don't really know what advantages it has over one of the combo kits like the Makita 1101 which is what I have. I use the Jessem Route R Lift FX which is fantastic and very reasonably priced. It accepts just the router motor, so installation and removal from my table is a snap. It also allows above the table bit changes. I'm very please with it. You should be able to use the original Jessem Route R Lift which will accept any router, but I don't think you can do above the table bit changes and removal is a pain. I think this older version was more intended to have the router dedicated to the table.

    6. "Most of these scenarios don't seem safe"

    Used properly, a router is one of the safest tools. Always move the workpiece in a router table from right to left. When holding the router, you will usually move left to right. There are exceptions for very specific reasons, but this is a tricky move since the router bit wants to "walk" away from the workpiece because of the direction of the spinning bit. You must hold the router very tightly when doing this. I don't recommend it when you are still getting comfortable with the router.

    A good online source for router information

    www.routerworkshop.com

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