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Who's at fault?

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  • #16
    Re: Who's at fault?

    Honestly, saying a manufacturere is at fault because the consumer did not use the equiipment properly?
    I like the saw stop idea but I don't want to have to pay what they are asking for it. Much like I like BMWs 700 series sedans but drive a Dodge minivan.
    If they were that concerned about our safety, they would offer the device to other manufactureres as an add on for a reasonable price. I mean, it is a block of aluminum, and actuator and a sensor cucuit...maybe 50 bucks worth of stuff.
    I dunno, maybe if I crach on my bicycle I can sue because it only has two wheels?

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    • #17
      Re: Who's at fault?

      If the courts are going to award money for stupid people and I have been one of them who got cut using a saw with out flesh detection device then you won't be able to use any kind of saw with out paying hundreds and the high end ones over a thousand at least for miter saws.

      I had a table saw accident where I didn't put something to protect myself and my board lifted on me and I reacted stupid and pushed it down and the blade caught my finger.



      7 stitches I was helping remodel my friends house and his father in law was there who is a Sargent with the local PD. The whole time we where in the hospital waiting for the doc. The nurses or cna's would walk in and I was introduced by him as dumb a**. It cut about a 1/3 of the way through the bone. It was a 1/2 years ago and still don't have feeling in the tip of my finger.

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      • #18
        Rouge SawStop Brake Activation

        SMC Thread: Rogue Sawstop Brake Activation

        Apparently your sawstop can fire when you least expect it, and ruin your blade for no good reason at all except to err on the side of caution and cost you a new cartridge. Together that's probably about $300 or more depending on the blade mounted on the saw at the time. Now SawStop may replace a cartridge that misfires, but will they replace the blade too?

        Interesting thread to follow.

        I'm in favor of the technology, I'm just not sure it is ready for prime time yet. It needs some more time in the sandbox to get the bugs worked out before I'll buy a saw that utilizes this technology.
        "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
        John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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        • #19
          Re: Who's at fault?

          Nutty product liability cases have been around forever.

          My first manager in the 1970s used to circulate articles through the design group on product liability cases. They were merely curiosities, because we were building military systems, not consumer products. But still very interesting. My favorite was about a guy that went out and bought a brand-name lawnmower. He got it home, then modified it by mounting it on stilts, so it would be a hedge trimmer. When he promptly cut his arm off, he sued the mower manufacturer.

          And won.

          Such cases are not rare.

          I don't blame lawyers. They are simply playing the game according to the rules.

          I don't even blame judges. If they threw the cases out of court as frivolous, the ACLU -with an army of liberals behind them - would be screaming that the courts were biased toward business. Film at eleven.

          So they leave it up to juries.

          And therein lies the problem. Jury selection takes what, about a day in most cases? If it's that easy to find 12 people that don't have the concept of personal responsibility, what does that say about society?

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          • #20
            Re: Who's at fault?

            More SawStop woes;

            http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...-on-my-SawStop
            "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
            John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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            • #21
              Re: Who's at fault?

              I blame the people who conceived the man who got hurt....stupid people shouldn't breed!

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              • #22
                Re: Who's at fault?

                After reading the details of the accident, I think very much of the problem falls to the contractor. He had removed the blade guard, provided absolutely wrong instructions to the victim, and gave no oversight or monitoring of the guy's experience and work methods.

                While clearly most of us, including me, would look at this and declare the guy was an idiot and should have known better, I have to look at my own experience and try to put myself at a machine with which I lacked any experience.

                (For example, I know absolutely "Zip" about brazing. Should someone instruct me wrong, on regulating the Oxygen/Acetaline and I suffer from burns in attempting to light the torch.... is it the fault of the equipment manufacturer or the guy who failed to give me the proper instructions? Yes, one could well say that I was an idiot and shouldn't have even attempted to do a job that I wasn't qualified for; but times are tough and one might well be taking any job that they could get. Likewise, the contractor might be looking to get the cheapest help he could get too!)

                Certainly, most of us have been put into situations where we have little or no knowledge and are almost totally dependant on the instructions that the boss, foreman, or experienced co-worker is providing. IF those instructions are wrong, then we may well be victims. But that wouldn't be the fault of the manufacturer!

                What I don't understand and haven't seen, is why the contractor has escaped any scrutiny and/or liability in this issue. Perhaps it's simply a matter or who has the financial resources for the lawyers to go after; in which case, Ryobi would certainly be the biggest target.

                In any case, it's darn hard for me to comprehend the massive $$$ from this liability case. Similarly, where was mind of the defense attorneys. It almost sounds like they felt defenseless and bowed to the accusations. Either way, the results of this situation may well affect us all with future tablesaw purchases.

                CWS
                Last edited by CWSmith; 02-13-2011, 04:23 PM.

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                • #23
                  Re: Who's at fault?

                  You can rest assured that we will all pay for this through higher prices for tools.

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