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  • Threaded Inserts

    Through the agony of frustration, the pains of ignorance and the chance of sounding like a total moron I must ask a question most of you will probably laugh at, but that's o.k. my wife laughs at me every night before I go to bed and if I can get back up the next day feeling good this should be a cake.
    "When building jigs where a threaded insert is called for how in the (insert expletive of your choice) do you screw it in without ripping the ears off?"
    The only ones I can find locally are brass, too soft to screw into oak they don't seem to get started without ripping off an ear. What's the secret?

  • #2
    Re: Threaded Inserts

    i am assuming you are trying to put this style of insert in.

    first have you tried to use bees wax on the threads?
    and another tip that helps is if you use a bolt with a nut on its threads screwed into the insert. then tighten the nut agaist the insert enough the bolt can't turn in the insert as you screw the insert into the wood.

    then unjam the nut from the insert and remove the bolt.

    here is a link to a jig to help install the inserts straight.
    http://www.woodsmith.com/issues/144/...raised-panels/
    Attached Files
    Last edited by MAS; 03-08-2010, 10:56 PM. Reason: added web link

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    • #3
      Re: Threaded Inserts

      Using a bolt and nut to hold the insert as you install works well. Adding to that, if you have a drill press, is to put the bolt in the chuck (ensures that you stay "true" as the insert goes in)
      Last edited by tomapple; 03-09-2010, 09:40 AM.

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      • #4
        Re: Threaded Inserts

        Most hardware stores carry...
        "T-Nuts"

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        • #5
          Re: Threaded Inserts

          Originally posted by tomapple View Post
          Using a bolt and nut to hold the insert as you install works well. Adding to that, if you have a drill press, is to put the bolt in the chuck (ensures that you stay "true" as the insert goes in)
          I use both of tomapple's solutions. I never put a screwdriver blade in the slot and try to drive it in that way. I think the slot is a gimmick to get you run back to the hardware store to get some more to replace the ones you ruined.

          Adam mentioned T-nuts and they're good too when the design permits. I like to put a small wood screw or two in the flange, right where the "teeth" bend up, to hold it in place. This keeps the bolt from knocking out the t-nut, which generally causes colorful language.

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          • #6
            Re: Threaded Inserts

            With all due respect: You are tapping the holes for the inserts--aren't you? There are special taps for these which leave the bottom two threads "tight" for a binding fit. Just my 2ยข worth, David

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            • #7
              Re: Threaded Inserts

              Thurman
              If by tapping you mean a pre-drilled hole just smaller than the insert then yes I am tapping the hole. I ended up having to drill a hole large enough to drop the insert in and then epoxy it in place. I know that's not the correct way buy I am ripping the ears off trying to thread them in. The brass it too soft to be 'screwed' in.

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              • #8
                Re: Threaded Inserts

                Using the bolt and jam-nut method, I put eight threaded inserts into a walnut dining table top with no losses. Try it.

                The tool set-up:

                the results;

                Go

                PS: these were the cheap inserts bought from the Borg (actually Lowes)
                Practicing at practical wood working

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                • #9
                  Re: Threaded Inserts

                  Thanks I will try this method immediately!!

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                  • #10
                    Re: Threaded Inserts

                    Good tip, Gofor, that's what I always do. Thread a bolt into the insert, screw the bolt in, remove bolt leaving insert. Works perfectly every time.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Threaded Inserts

                      No, I meant a real "thread cutting" tap for threaded inserts, the same principle as tapping metal. You would run the tap into a properly sized hole and it leaves threads for the insert with the bottom thread being tight to bind the insert in. These even work in blind holes. I have not seen a threaded insert which was designed to cut it's own threads in wood. These taps do not work too good with MDF. David

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                      • #12
                        Re: Threaded Inserts

                        Thurman,

                        Perhaps the following web site will provide enlightenment

                        http://www.ezlok.com/InsertsWood/index.html

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Threaded Inserts

                          I learn something new each day. Thanks. BUT-maybe because I'm a machinist by trade: IF you drill a hole the correct size in wood, then the insert just "screws" in by itself, the insert does not have that much holding power. Maybe I'll just go buy some and learn. David

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                          • #14
                            Re: Threaded Inserts

                            Actually, I would think that cutting threads in wood (eg removing the material for the thread) would be weaker than leaving the material in the hole by forming them as the inserts do (and as all wood screws do).

                            Think about it...same as holds true for rolled threads versus cut threads.

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