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  • Question about 110 vs 220

    Morning all, I have the TS3650 and noticed alot of people switching to 220v. What are the benifits of going to 220volt? I use 110 now and this gives me ability to use any outlet in shop.
    I was thinking of trying 220 then I would have to use only dedicated outlet. Can some give advice as to what would be gained going 220. Lower amp draw?, Would motor life be extended?
    Just wondering if benifits would be worth the change. Your thoughts appreciated, Thanks, Rick.
    (p.s. my older craftsman was 110v- 1hp. and went over 15 years)

  • #2
    Murph - See the post that's currently directly below yours.... another 110 vs 220 post

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    • #3
      Read post WIRING QUESTION, dated:10-06-03,at ASK THE WOODWORKING EXPERTS

      [ 01-27-2004, 11:35 AM: Message edited by: NUGGY ]

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      • #4
        Thanks guys, I must have still been asleep when I posted as I did'nt notice the post allready here!
        I also did a search and found the other post mentioned by Nuggy. This answered most questions.
        My 110 line is 12 gauge 20 amp, butit sounds like the motor would like 220 a little better if it was available. I've done most of the wiring my self and just had it inspected by pro. who said all looked well. But one more question if you don't mind? I have a 220v-50amp dedicated line for an arc welder could I use this line to also run 220 power to the saw as the welder and saw would never be in use at the same time. Or should I use say seperate 220-20amp 12 gauge wire just to the saw. What I've been told the larger 50 amp breaker is ok as long as I use correct gauge wire for 50 amp as the breaker mainly protects wiring and if saw is over loaded the motor protection takes care of that. Does this sound right?
        Again thanks, Rick

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        • #5
          That's correct. You could use your 50A welder feeder to your saw if you like.

          [ 01-27-2004, 02:04 PM: Message edited by: NUGGY ]

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          • #6
            thats not a good idea. For a 50 A breaker I believe you need to run AWG 6. If you run AWG 12 from the box that your welder plugs into you have a potential for a fire. 12 gauge wire would get hot enough to melt the insulation before the current draw was close enough to 50A to trip the breaker. The gist of the 'code' is that anything downstream from the breaker should be rated to support equal to or greater than the breaker rating. EG. if you have a 15 A breaker there is no problem using 12 gauge wire ( can support 20A ) and a 15A rated socket, however you should not use a 20A breaker with 12 gauge wire and a 15A rated socket. This is why I think 12 gauge (20A) wire and a 15A socket on a 50 A breaker is a bad idea

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            • #7
              In addition to the above, there was an article in Popular Woodworking a couple of issues back that dealt with this. Their bottom line was that 220 was worth it.

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              • #8
                I thought the question was if he could plug in the saw in a 50A feeder which I would assume to have #6 wire. He didn't ask if he could wire a #12 wire to a 50A breaker. If the latter is his intention then I'm wrong, I misunderstood the question.

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                • #9
                  Again thanks for all the input. NUGGY you are correct if I used the 50 amp feed I would take a branch off but not down size the wire gauge to the saws outlet. I do know 12 gauge won't handle that amperage! But something I thought of is the outlet would have to be the large dryer, range type thus the huge plug and cord assy. would have to be on the saw. I don't think any smaller type would work with the heavy gauge wire? That is what the welder is set up with and probably don't want that heavy on my saw. When I stated running 20 amp to saw I meant adding a new 220-20amp breaker and 12 or 10 gauge wire from breaker box to saw but I don't think I have any room for additional breaker so that is why I considered using the welders line. I will have to check and see if there is room to add another breaker? I now feel I want to go the 220 route for the saw as it will see alot of use. Again thanks for input you've got me rethinking things! If I do make changes I will have it checked before use.
                  I've done alot of wiring which saves alot on labor but won't risk a hazard and for a liscensed electrician to just check things he uses me pretty good. Rick

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                  • #10
                    Was just reviewing post "calling electricians" The link to electricity in woodshop posted by Bob s. in one of the paragraphs about rewiring a motor from 110 to 220 he states that there is no real advantage to rewire a 110 to 220 if the 110 is sized correctly.(110v-20amp,12gauge wire) As he states if there is no real voltage drop on 110 there is really no benefit to be gained going 220. I run just that 110-20amp,12gauge wire and the saw is plugged in first outlet from panel?
                    And if I use extension cord it is also either 25'14 gauge or 50' 12 gauge so now am wondering if best to stay as I am? The saw comes right up to speed, has plenty of power and does'nt get overly warm. Again what are some others thoughts?
                    Didn't know this would get so complicated but it is good info. to know. And better safe than sorry!
                    Thanks again all, will continue to follow along.
                    Rick.

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