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Been looking at the TS3650

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  • Been looking at the TS3650

    I have been looking at the TS3650 for a while now but I do not want to mess with the arbor install. If I buy a new one, will it have the fixed arbor? Are they recalling current stock to be fixed. I would hate to have to search endless Home Depots to find one with the fixed arbor (as much of a pain as installing the arbor myself).

  • #2
    I seriously doubt they will be recalling the saws already made. They appear to be handling this on a case-by-case basis---no big announcement---just fixing the arbors of those who have complained. This is just speculation, based on their actions thus far.

    To be fair, from what other owners have said, this is a quality control issue in that some owners say they don't have the arbor problem---hard to say if it was a defect from one supplier or no QC inspections of the parts.

    I think you'd have to read through the threads here and decide for yourself. People have had any number of alternative brands of saw as suggestions.
    Dave

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    • #3
      Some of Ridgid's tools have proven themselves well, but not all. The same is true of most manufacturers. With all due respect to current owners who have deep feelings towards their 3650s, the TS3650 has fallen from grace in my eyes. It's been plagued with nagging little problems from the onset. The latest problem to receive public attention is the arbor, which IMHO is the biggest problem so far....the others seemed minor at the time, but now I see them as one of multiple issues. I feel for current owners who were blind sided and had to deal with these issues. I realize many people got them for 20-30% off which may have helped cushion the blow from the problems. But if I were about to spend nearly $600 for a TS, I'd have written this one off a while ago. There are just too many good competitors in this price range to justify taking on known problems and the added quality risk this machine currently presents. Many other saws will spin an arbor smoothly with sufficient power and support to do an admirable job of cutting wood...it's a simple feat for today's technology. Anyone who's impressed with the way the 3650 performs, would likely also be impressed with the performance of another comparably priced machine in today's market. So from that perspective, I don't understand why people feel compelled to risk jumping into the pool of owners who are struggling to get their saws to perform as advertised, and who may be wondering what's next.

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      • #4
        I'd like to add a thought to this. I realize that HD and Sears are, in general, conveinent to most people, which I think, in part, is why even with questionable quality, people find it easy to "like" one of their tools.

        I think if you start looking at other local ww'ing stores, you will even find, with a bit of searching, that you can find deals on other saws---saws which (while none are perfect) at least haven't had a long string of problems.
        Dave

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        • #5
          I have been following the arbor thread for some time now. It is unfortunate that the problem happened and it is good Ridgid is owing up to it but now that they know about it, I would like to buy a new saw that does not have the problem. I still think it is a good saw if you are willing to fix it. All saws have their pros and cons and I have been weighing them for some time now. I have also looked at Grizzly, General, PM, Delta, and others. General raised the price of their contractor saw and I do not think it is as good of a buy at the higher price (I would go for the craftsman mini-cab at that price). The Grizzly pulls too much current for my garage/shop circuits. I have now talked myself into the new craftsman saw with Beis fence. It is more than I want to spend so I am hoping to get it on sale sometime this year unless I can buy the Ridgid with the right arbor already installed and no other major problems pop up.

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          • #6
            Sears has three versions of the new mini cabinet saw. The 22114 with cast iron wings, retractable indexing fence, miter gauge fence w/hold down clamp, and a decent blade for a suggested retail of $650, but often sells for $540 or less. Like you, I'd prefer the Biese version (22124)if I had the money, but feedback on the 22114 has been quite positive so far.

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            • #7
              Heres a good case in point on "problems". Since 1998, when Sears broke with Emerson on all their stationary tools, their product has been a joke----while I'm not saying there's a thing wrong with the new saw, as far and I and many others, they've got 6 years of bad reputation to live down, which would make me hesitant.

              Be aware, that all companies are likely to pass along the price increases General has had, due to steel and devalued dollar.

              Bdog---yes, all saws have their pros and cons, but not all have had a string of quality issues like this Ridgid model.
              Dave

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              • #8
                Well I took the plunge and bought the 22124! Knot Me had some good points about the Ridgid saw. Usually the problems discussed with table saws are "this one does this better than that one" kind of comments. Not "the legs are unstable" or "the arbor is flawed". That line of thinking pushed me into spending more money on what I hope turns out to be a really good saw. I agree with daveferg that Sears has alot of rep to make up. With all the good reviews and satisfied customers (so far!) Took a chance with the 22124. I hope I made the right choice.

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                • #9
                  I also took the plunge and bought the Craftsman 22114 on Saturday. Assembly was simple. had it up and running in a couple of hours. Passed the nickel test on the first start up. Everything seems solid and smooth so far. Also got a dado set, insert and 60t carbide blade with a mail in rebate with the saw. So far I am exteremly pleased.
                  "Semper Fi"
                  "A man who farts in church sits in own pew"

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                  • #10
                    I've never hesitated to bash Sears over a long list of past problems, but the review of the new saw was quite impressive. Also, the fact that they have a Biesemeyer fence also says they're serious.

                    I did find the review very interesting (Workbench Mag.) in that the pioneer's of the 'hybrid' saws lost out to the Craftsman and General. Always knew the Jet was bad, but they weren't real impressed with the DeWalt.

                    I am curious----understand that the Craftsman has cabinet saw-like trunions. Have you owners found them to be pretty stiff?---i.e., the saw stays in alignment? Is it like a cabinet saw--you just move the top around?
                    Dave

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                    • #11
                      Hope things for work out well for you Bdog and Scrambler....I'm liking what I see of those new saws, and what I've read has been extremely positive.

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                      • #12
                        Dave,

                        My experience with a true cabinet saw is nil, except maybe in high school shop class many years ago, so couldn't really tell you. As far as how long everything stays in alignment, only time will tell. You can be assured that I will post any problems that I may run across as well as the positives. However, at this point, in my opinion this saw blows away the TS3650's that I have played with at various Home Depots. I don't have to worry about modifying legs or replacing an arbor on a brand new piece of equipment either, which played a huge part in my decision.
                        "Semper Fi"
                        "A man who farts in church sits in own pew"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I read the magazine review too, and lhave looked at the Craftsman 22124 on the sales floor a coulpe times now. Even though it is about $300 more, if this saw had been available when I bought my TS3650 last year(Dec 2003), I would have seriously considered it over the TS3650.
                          Has a nice solid cabinet. The blade guard is fairly easy to remove but not as nice as the old Craftsman (Emerson) system which is what is used on the TS-3650 now. That's right, Ridgid didn't dream this up, it's been around a long time. Don't know why Craftsman didn't stick with it but the new design seems OK. A ton of other features that otheres have talked about and I will not repeat here. It's a new machine that has no track record as yet, but 6 months to a year from now if the reports are still good I may be tempted to get one.

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                          • #14
                            scrambler--thanks---from the picture it was hard to see how the trunions were mounted on the Craftsman. I will tell you that should I ever upgrade to a cabinet saw, that will be one of the main selling points for me, having spent many hours adjusting contractors' saw trunions.

                            Bob---That guard mounting system is tops----I can't believe the patent is still in force, but there must be something or other companies would have adapted it----yeah, it was one thing that the new Ridgid guys didn't change for the worse.
                            Dave

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                            • #15
                              Ferg - Ever consider a set of PALS from In-line Industries? $20 delivered. Easy to install and effective for easy, minute adjustments...plus they help hold the trunnions in place so they're less likely to move. I'm not saying they're as good as cab saw trunnions, but they're $20 well invested if you have a contractor saw.

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