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  • Chuck on DP1550

    I bought this drill press recently. I have a question about mounting the chuck. Instructions say to slide it up the shaft, after ensuring the sleeve is free from any dirt, and finally with the jaws open press it against the piece of wood. Is that it? I am wondering what holds the chuck in place? There are no threads to screw on, and nothing to snap in. What holds the chuck in place if all I did was to press it against the wood?

  • #2
    Re: Chuck on DP1550

    If I understand you correctly, the chuck has a precision female taper ground into the non-jaw end, and that chuck fits into the matching male precision taper on the DP vertical shaft. The two hold together by friction.This is a very common, tried-and-true approach used very commonly in machine tools. This approach is used to assure the chuck runs truely concentric with the shaft that drives the chuck (the quill shaft). Caution - the mating surfaces MUST be CLEAN, and the tapers MUST be the same. For example -wikipedia "morse taper". Jim

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    • #3
      Re: Chuck on DP1550

      I just bought a Delta benchtop this winter. Mine said to take a wooden mallet and drive it home. I was amazed but it seems fine.
      Never outsmart your common sense

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Chuck on DP1550

        Originally posted by Craig Moore View Post
        I just bought a Delta benchtop this winter. Mine said to take a wooden mallet and drive it home. I was amazed but it seems fine.
        OK, but what is "home"? How do you know it is in place? Just because the mallet won't drive it any further?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Chuck on DP1550

          Originally posted by jfin View Post
          If I understand you correctly, the chuck has a precision female taper ground into the non-jaw end, and that chuck fits into the matching male precision taper on the DP vertical shaft. The two hold together by friction.This is a very common, tried-and-true approach used very commonly in machine tools. This approach is used to assure the chuck runs truely concentric with the shaft that drives the chuck (the quill shaft). Caution - the mating surfaces MUST be CLEAN, and the tapers MUST be the same. For example -wikipedia "morse taper". Jim
          Thanks for the reference. I work quite a bit with cordless drills and all of them have threaded shaft onto which you screw the chuck. I also seem to remember one drill press I saw before that also had a threaded shaft. This is the first time I see the tapered shaft. I suppose being truly concentric minimizes the runoff?

          Also, when pressing the chuck against the wood to drive it home, how do I know when it is in place? Using the drill's handles, I pressed the chuck down against the scrap plywood, and it didn't move up by much. To test it, I removed the chuck with the mallet, as per the manual, and it didn't require a lot of force to knock it out. How can I be sure that it won't slip out during the operation? Silly questions maybe for someone with experience, and common sense tells me Ridgid would not use untested technology, but still...

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Chuck on DP1550

            The fit is "friction" as previously mentioned. I believe the taper is a "Jacobs Taper", if I recall correctly. (Somewhere in the recent past, I've posted a picture of my chuck with the laser etching of the type and taper number on the chuck.)

            In any case, it is the friction of the fit that holds the chuck in place. That is the reason, the mating surfaces must be very clean and free of any dust or debris.

            As I recall, I simply placed a block of wood on the table, and with the chuck fully open (so you're bringing pressure to the body of the chuck and NOT to the jaws), you simply use the quill to press the chuck into place. I think that after I did that, I actually just used the handles to "bump" the chuck into the block a couple of times. It really doesn't take much in the way of force or pressure.

            However, one should note that for all normal drilling operations the force is continually downward as you press the drill bit into the stock. There really is no side-to-side pressure, nor should there ever be any pulling pressure as I can't imaging have to force an "extraction" of the drill bit from any stock that is properly drilled.

            I have not used my 1550 with a drum sander, so I don't know how well that works... but in using a drum, I wouldn't think you would apply an awful lot of side pressure, just let the spinning drum do it's work.

            One must take serious note however, that you simply cannot use an imbalanced tool in the chuck, like a "fly cutter". Likewise you cannot use a spade (butterfly) bit or probably even a large Forstner bit without paying close attention to the proper speed setting of the belts. Such imbalance and/or higher speed of a larger diameter cutter like a spade bit can loosen the chuck from the taper. This is extremely so with an imbalanced tool, like the fly-cutter.

            The manual clearly warns against such use!

            After three years of using my 1550 to a very large degree, I have only had the chuck come loose one time.... that is when I used a 1-1/2 inch spade bit and forgot to adjust the belt to the slower speed. Fortunately, the bit was buried well within the stock when the chuck came loose, with a resulting chatter as the spindle simply rotated around the loosened taper. If I had been using a fly-cutter, I'm sure that it would have flown with some velocity and I would have been seriously hurt.

            So, take heed to manual and it's stated restrictions.

            I hope this helps,

            CWS
            Last edited by CWSmith; 04-18-2010, 12:51 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Chuck on DP1550

              I am pretty sure I used a bridgeport with a taper. That thing had a lot of side loading and I never lost the chuck on it. I think the only think i have ever has the taper come out of was a cheap lathe when the live tail center came loose because the tail end clamp worked loose.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Chuck on DP1550

                Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
                The fit is "friction" as previously mentioned. I believe the taper is a "Jacobs Taper", if I recall correctly. (Somewhere in the recent past, I've posted a picture of my chuck with the laser etching of the type and taper number on the chuck.)

                In any case, it is the friction of the fit that holds the chuck in place. That is the reason, the mating surfaces must be very clean and free of any dust or debris.

                As I recall, I simply placed a block of wood on the table, and with the chuck fully open (so you're bringing pressure to the body of the chuck and NOT to the jaws), you simply use the quill to press the chuck into place. I think that after I did that, I actually just used the handles to "bump" the chuck into the block a couple of times. It really doesn't take much in the way of force or pressure.

                However, one should note that for all normal drilling operations the force is continually downward as you press the drill bit into the stock. There really is no side-to-side pressure, nor should there ever be any pulling pressure as I can't imaging have to force an "extraction" of the drill bit from any stock that is properly drilled.

                I have not used my 1550 with a drum sander, so I don't know how well that works... but in using a drum, I wouldn't think you would apply an awful lot of side pressure, just let the spinning drum do it's work.

                One must take serious note however, that you simply cannot use an imbalanced tool in the chuck, like a "fly cutter". Likewise you cannot use a spade (butterfly) bit or probably even a large Forstner bit without paying close attention to the proper speed setting of the belts. Such imbalance and/or higher speed of a larger diameter cutter like a spade bit can loosen the chuck from the taper. This is extremely so with an imbalanced tool, like the fly-cutter.

                The manual clearly warns against such use!

                After three years of using my 1550 to a very large degree, I have only had the chuck come loose one time.... that is when I used a 1-1/2 inch spade bit and forgot to adjust the belt to the slower speed. Fortunately, the bit was buried well within the stock when the chuck came loose, with a resulting chatter as the spindle simply rotated around the loosened taper. If I had been using a fly-cutter, I'm sure that it would have flown with some velocity and I would have been seriously hurt.

                So, take heed to manual and it's stated restrictions.

                I hope this helps,

                CWS
                Thanks for sharing your experience.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Chuck on DP1550

                  Originally posted by Millipede View Post
                  I am pretty sure I used a bridgeport with a taper. That thing had a lot of side loading and I never lost the chuck on it. I think the only think i have ever has the taper come out of was a cheap lathe when the live tail center came loose because the tail end clamp worked loose.
                  If by "Bridgeport" you are referring to a vertical milling machine, they typically use R8 collets to hold the cutting tools (which are tightened into the spindle from on top via a draw bolt.).

                  Entirely different than the morse taper or jacobs taper. Both of which are not designed for operations with side loading and should never be used for such.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Chuck on DP1550

                    Sounds like your question's been answered quite well already. All I can add is that I had no trouble seating the chuck on my DP1550. And, keep in mind, I'm a girl. I may be relatively strong, but I'm no ...say....hulking plumber... (*ducks for incoming pipe fittings*). In 4 years of service, I've never had a single problem from the chuck or quill on the DP.
                    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Chuck on DP1550

                      Good forum you guys have got here.
                      I have my eye on the DP1550 Ridgid Drill Press. Just wondering whether it's worth the money?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Chuck on DP1550

                        Fred,

                        Welcome to the Ridgid forum!

                        I've owned my DP1550 for about four or five years now and I'm very happy with it. I use it almost exclusively for woodworking and it nicely accomplishes every task that I apply it too. It's "collar" depth stop is different than the usual "stop rod" found on many drill presses, but I rather like it and when needed, it allows me to set the depth perfectly.

                        The table, though allowing an nice clamping surface around it's edge, really doesn't answer the complete needs for most woodworkers and I therefore purchased a Rockler (one of many brands) drillpress table top, which has a much larger surface and a fence. That table just makes the DP1550 just about perfect for my needs.

                        Power is plenty for almost any species of wood I would think. I know it certainly hasn't hesitated on me, even with rather large diameter bores.

                        Hopefully many of the other members will jump in here and offer you their experience. For me, I couldn't ask for more.

                        Welcome,

                        CWS

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