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  • Enclosing TS back

    Have any of you guys fabricated an enclosure for the back of your TS3612 (or 2424/2412) similar to the one at Wood Magazine ? I want to say that once upon a time I read a thread about this and that someone had, maybe DaveFerg ... (I'm too lazy to do a search right now )
    Alan
    My Shop

  • #2
    i personally havent made one of these. in fact i have never even seen the plan for these. dust collection for my saw isnt currently a concern as i have the ability to wheel it outside and work out there. when i do use it in the shop the shop vac does the trick. as far as the plan you referenced, it does look like a great idea, with one exception. it is my opinion that the motor and pully assembly would end up collecting a lot more dust and therefore slipping and/or bogging down. just my obversation about the plan

    ed
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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    • #3
      Alan:
      I made a panel for the back of the saw by first using cardboard and cutting it for a good fit and allowing for the motor support bars and the clearance for the rear fence lock. I then transferred the outline to the smooth side of masonite, cut it out, and used some magnetic tape to fasten it to the rear of the saw with the motor support bars running through a slot in the panel. Has to be removed for bevel cuts, but 99% of my cuts are with the blade vertical. It could be more efficient if I made another small rectangular panel with a vertical slot in it for the belt, but my dust collector has enough volume capability to make it unnecessary. Works great and keeps the sawdust off the motor.

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      • #4
        I made one from the plan and it works great. It did not take all that long to make and it has been well worth the effort.

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        • #5
          I didn't make an enclosure for mine, but I am using the dust collection accessory. It comes with a small deflector that mounts to the rear of the saw. With the DC accessory and a shop vac, I don't need to sweep up at the end of the day and haven't found a need to enclose the rest of the saw back yet.

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          • #6
            'Fraid it wasn't me! I'm still looking at designs. You can go crazy thinking, until you realize it has to be in two pieces. One design I saw had the split along a horizontal line, which seemed easier to remove. I agree---make it for use with your 90 degree cuts. I've seen a design where someone tried to allow for the shifting of the belt. Not only was it hard to measure/cut, it left a pretty good sized hole.
            Dave

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            • #7
              I made the one from the WOOD magazine plan. Just used hardboard and heavy duty velcro. Works pretty good. I also have a flat panel installed that covers the bottom opening of the saw. My 4 inch dust collection hose is mounted in the center of that panel.

              All of this works pretty well but I still have to remove the panel periodically to get the dust that collects in the corners of the case.

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              • #8
                I tried the flat bottom years ago, still blew sawdust all over, finally made a v shape trough with 2" radius on bottom with a 3"ABS (4"OD) joiner inserted in the rear. MUCH better and DC hose slips on with a friction fit.

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                • #9
                  WaMan,

                  Do you have any drawings, pics, etc. on your trough? I think I'd like to try that on my saw.

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                  • #10
                    Here are a few pictures of the dust collection covers I made for my Ridgid TS2424LS... Connects with Velcro...

                    http://community.webshots.com/photo/...42692110KcDdld

                    http://community.webshots.com/photo/...42692122RlREwo

                    I feel they work very well... As said in the post above, I too need to remove my covers for bevel cuts, but that isn't very often... I f I cut bevels more frequently, then I would put an arc slot and never take it off...

                    If you have questions or need more details, feel free to drop me an e-mail...
                    Regards,<br /><br />Big Johnson<br /><br />Pictures: <a href=\"http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php</a>

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                    • #11
                      Mike:
                      I measured the width and length of the rectangular opening on the bottom of the saw. Take a piece of grid paper and layout the width to scale at the top of the paper. Draw a 4" circle to scale centered 7" inches below the width line. Draw lines from each end of the width line tangent to the circle. This is the end view of the trough. I used two pieces of 3/4 ply for the ends, one end solid, the other with the complete circle cut out. Epoxy the 3" ABS coupling into the opening flush with the inside of the rear end. Use a piece of aluminum sheet as wide as the rectangular opening is long (allowing for clearance). Arrange two saw horses side by side, just close enough to allow the aluminum to clear. Clamp the plywood end pieces upside down to the saw horses, center the aluminum over them and attach the aluminum with #4X1/4 sheet metal screws, drilling holes as you go. I put flanges on the edges of the aluminum to sit on ledges inside the saw and had to raise the table off the base to install it.

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