Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

TP1300 price drop

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • TP1300 price drop

    The TP1300 Planer price has been lowered to $329 Think it is time to buy now! The Jointer is still at $399, a good price, but I'm playing the waiting game.
    Alan
    My Shop

  • #2
    While the old Ridgid planer has received good marks, IMHO, $329 isn't much of a markdown. Besides, the whole portable planer market has change---Delta and now DeWalt have introduced 2 speed models with disposable knives (big time and cost savings). I think I'd shop around a bit more---now if they drop another $100 for the Ridgid---then it might be worth another look!
    Dave

    Comment


    • #3
      I just saw this also and was surprised by the price. There was a nice review of table top planers in Fine Woodworking's Shop & Tools issue last winter that is essentially replicated in their Tool Guide at:
      http://www.taunton.com/store/pdf/nmtg01_02.pdf
      The TP1300 got a great review, they claimed that the additional speed on the Delta did little for improved finish, and if you add the cost of the extras which are included with the Ridgid (extra set of knives, dust port, stand) into the cost of the Delta, it costs $560 ($430 planer + $40 for extra knives + $30 for dust hood + $60 for stand) compared to $330 for the Ridgid. That seems like a "real" savings of $230. Pretty sweet deal. I wonder how long they'll keep the price at $330?

      Comment


      • #4
        As posted above, the whole planer market has changed since the last planer review in the mags. DeWalt has come out with two new models, the 734 and 735. The 734 is like the old 733 with an extra knife which gives it a CPI better than the two speed Delta. It only selld for $379 at Lowe's. The 735 is only $449 and IMO is worth saving up teh extra $$ for as it has a boatload of features, including an auto cutterhead lock.

        Comment


        • #5
          So if ya could only have one of these, Jointer or Planer, which would you choose?

          As a very amateur garage hobbyist with some construction plans, I would hate to pass up a deal if one occurs, but which would be the more essential?

          Comment


          • #6
            You guys know which brand I would choose. However, I wanted to comment on "which would you choose - a planer or jointer". They really are two different machines. Basically, the jointer creates a straight face and an edge perpendicular to the straight face. A thickness planer makes the opposite face parallel to the face that was run over the jointer and also planes the board to the desired thickness. I'm not sure I explained that throughly, but I get a lot of feedback from people who purchase a planer or jointer and it doesn't do what they though it would. Thanks!

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks, bd. I am fairly clear on the functions, and just wondered what the experienced felt was the more useful device.

              I would think the jointer, but if you mostly buy factory edged stuff, maybe a planer has more practical applications. Or perhaps a planer doesn't make enough sense unless you have a jointer first.

              I would probably be better served putting the $$$ to sanders and nailers anyway, just curious.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'd give my jointer up. Planer? No way.

                Lots and lots of relatively simple ways to do what a jointer does, with other tools. But what a planer does is pure torture to do in other ways.

                Dave

                Comment


                • #9
                  Guess it all depends on your experience. The jointer was the second stationary tool I bought, after the table saw. Main reason was to get true edges for glue-ups. While I could get a pretty good edge without the jointer---still they weren't always top notch----since getting the jointer, never a failure.

                  As to the FWW review of the Delta 2-speed---that's one reason I don't trust there reviews----I'd challenge any of their editors/writers to do the "feel" test with the two speeds----they'd looses every time----but even this may be yesterday's news with the new DeWalt with three knives----reviews seemed pretty impressive.
                  Dave

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Just finished planing a couple of 2x2 stock. I can't see how any other tabletop planer could inprove on the almost glass like finish my 1300 gave me. I am well satisfied with mine!
                    \"Is it Friday yet?\"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey Dave! You talked about the price dropping another $100 (USD). I just about messed myself when I went to HD in Brampton, Ontario this evening!!!!! In Canadian dollars the TP1300 normally goes between $585 and $630 CDN. It is now on for $399 CDN. Thats about $265 USD! Is Rigid planning on coming out with a new 2-speed model? This is a great chance for us up in Canada to pick up on this equipment. P.S. The stores up here had reduced the price of the TS2612 by a third and in at least 4 stores I have visited, they no longer have any in stock.

                      Chris Berg
                      Chris Berg

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Dave Arbuckle:
                        I'd give my jointer up. Planer? No way.

                        Lots and lots of relatively simple ways to do what a jointer does, with other tools. But what a planer does is pure torture to do in other ways.

                        Dave
                        Dave,
                        Would you care to elaborate for those less experienced among us? I can find plenty of uses for a planer with the projects I am doing now but keep thinking I need the jointer to get one face flat first.
                        Alan
                        My Shop

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mark IV:
                          I would think the jointer, but if you mostly buy factory edged stuff, maybe a planer has more practical applications. Or perhaps a planer doesn't make enough sense unless you have a jointer first.

                          I would probably be better served putting the $$$ to sanders and nailers anyway, just curious.
                          Mark - I'm with you on this. I just bought a P-C brad nailer and compressor kit because I could come up with more uses for those on current (or recent) projects. However, I check the prices on the Ridgid stuff daily I really want the planer and jointer. I have been buying some "rough stock" and finishing it on my TS3612. The jointer and planer look better every time I do this. I look forward to Mr. Arbuckle's wisdom on this...
                          Alan
                          My Shop

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            keep thinking I need the jointer to get one face flat first

                            Step one: don't buy crud. Tongue and cheek, but to hear some tell it they try to use the nastiest twisted and bowed junk there ever was. Pass it by. Go to a yard that lets you pick the wood you want, even if it costs you a few cents more per board foot. You'll be miles ahead.

                            Step two: Bring the nice stuff you've picked back to the shop, and store it properly. Never restrict airflow to one side, or lay it on concrete. Either is just about guaranteed to make good straight boards look like something from the Pringles factory.

                            But nevertheless, some inconsistency is bound to slip into your life, just like it does in mine.

                            The assumption here is that you have a planer, but no jointer. The reason this is important is because you don't have to get the piece optically flat before planing, you only have to get it flat enough for the planer to be able to do the job.

                            There are three warps that affect faces, twist, bow, and cup. The fourth warp, crook, only affects edges.

                            Cup is easy. In fact, most boards that are cupped, you can flatten directly on the planer. Only if the board is quite wide and rather thin might you have a problem, because the planer could press it flat. If the board is very wide, you probably had a problem even with a jointer since they are limited in width.

                            Bowed boards are often pretty easy to fix. What you need to do here is closely examine your board. I find, the vast majority of times, that there is an obvious cause for a bow, like a pin knot parallel to the face of the board. So, this is not really a bowed board, it is two pretty straight boards, joined by this knot. Cut out the knot, and the warp defect is gone. If the board is overall consistently bowed, well, I probably didn't buy it in the first place. I don't trust wood that acts like that. But, if I have need for some short pieces, and I can reduce or eliminate the bow by crosscutting, I might do that.

                            Twisted boards can be treated pretty much like bowed ones. When purchasing, if I cannot see a grain defect that causes the twist, that board doesn't make my grade, it doesn't come home. If there's a cause, I proceed like the bowed boards.

                            If you take an overall bowed or twisted board, and just use a surfacing cut to remove it, the chances are good you end up with a very thin board that isn't good for much anyway.

                            In picking through boards, it is important that you ask first if using a commercial type lumberyard. Be sure to mention your slavish devotion to leaving stacks looking better than when you arrived, and follow through on that. One of the major ojections to allowing stack picking is that some creeps leave a mess behind, and no one wants to deal with that.

                            It's kind of a different philosophy, but one that I think fits well with a hobbiest or custom woodworker. Guys who crank out cabinets by the gazillion can't afford to take the time to treat each board like a unique individual, but I sure can.

                            Dave
                            [edit]Stay tuned for Chapter 2: How to actually flatten boards using a planer, and other common shop tools. I gotta take a breather after Chapter 1...

                            [ 10-01-2003, 11:49 PM: Message edited by: Dave Arbuckle ]

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              ...Guys who crank out cabinets by the gazillion can't afford to take the time to treat each board like a unique individual, but I sure can.
                              Jeez, talk about getting yer money's worth out of a bbs... eager to hear more from the jointer side of it now.

                              I'm sure there isn't any right answer. We hackers just have to extrapolate from context if a post makes sense for what we actually do. It is nice to see things you "kinda" know brought together in a practical way.

                              A good discussion is usually more informative than the actual opinion, and this was a perfect essay for the less-informed (i.e., me). This goes to the great FAQ in the sky.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X