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  • changing to 220v ?

    anyone know if it is possible to run the 4511 on 220v by a little rewiring of the motor ?
    seems to me that it would be more powerful if a guy could do that
    larry

  • #2
    Re: changing to 220v ?

    Yes, I believe it is covered in the assemby book... I don't think there is a huge benefit... I could be wrong.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: changing to 220v ?

      Yes, it absolutely can be done. I have done it. As iamwelty says, it is in the manual, in common with all the other RIDGID products that are capable of such conversion.

      The process involves changing the interconnections of the input to the windings, and changing the plug. You DO NOT need to change the switch or cable.

      You need a NEMA 5-20P plug, new wire nuts (I think 4, might be 3) and some electrical tape. Of course the wall receptacle needs to match the plug in the first place.

      The benefits are that it draws less current, spins up faster, and is far more likely to have exclusive use of the circuit than a 110 motor. Any extension cables do not need to be as beefy as for 110, as it draws half the current, but must be 250V rated.

      Since changing, my saw never bogs down. It used to do that on 110. Probably a combination of circuit exclusivity and toleration of excess current demand for a short period.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: changing to 220v ?

        Larry - Switching to 220v won't increase the power....it's a matter of voltage times amperage... as the voltage doubles the amperage halves, so the power output remains the same. Theoretically, there's really no difference between 110v and 220v (aka 120v and 240v) to the motor....the motors coils are either wired in series or parallel and each coil sees 120v in either configuration, but in real world conditions there are situations when switching does have some benefit. If the current 110v line has other appliances running on it, or it's a really long run, or has inadequate wire size, lots of junctions, etc., which rob the saw of all the amperage it needs (noted by slow startup, lights dimming, excessive bogging, etc), then switching to 220v might have less voltage drop during start up and peak demand, which in turn can help the saw run to it's full potential. Each situation is different depending on the circuit and motor.

        If 220v is already available, I'd make the switch...it's simple and only requires a new plug to match the 220v outlet....no harm done, and some possible benefit. If you don't have 220v, and you're experiencing any of the symptoms mentioned above, then it might still be worth going to the trouble to add a line...(I added mine myself from an unused dryer line, and it made a noticeable improvement in my similar Craftsmann 22124). If you're saw is running superbly and you're not experiencing any issues from voltage drop, and if 220v would be a hassle/expense then I wouldn't bother.

        Good setup and good blade choice can make a huge difference in the saw's end performance. Good luck.
        Last edited by hewood; 05-01-2010, 07:45 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: changing to 220v ?

          Originally posted by hewood View Post
          If the current 110v line has other appliances running on it, or it's a really long run, or has inadequate wire size, lots of junctions, etc., which rob the saw of all the amperage it needs (noted by slow startup, lights dimming, excessive bogging, etc)

          I switched my 3650 over to 220V & it made a Big difference in the performance!
          But that was also due to a wiring problem with my garage.


          Another thing to consider when running high current machines or appliances on 110V is balancing the loads out on your main electric panel! I have an older house & In my case (like HEWOOD pointed out) due to a “poor wiring design” my garage was on the same load side of my main panel as the kitchen & furnace! I had a friend of mine who's an electrician fix that & add the 220V line to the garage.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: changing to 220v ?

            thanks for all the informative posts !
            I am bldg a new house and have spec'd 220v in the garage so will be going for it ...
            today I pick up the saw ( from original owner ) am looking forward to fine tuning it ...something that will be possible thanks to you guys !
            cheers

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: changing to 220v ?

              Actually the plug would be a NEMA L6-20 not L5-20. The L5-20 is a 120v plug and the L6-20 is 240v.

              Paul

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: changing to 220v ?

                Originally posted by pderocher View Post
                Actually the plug would be a NEMA L6-20 not L5-20. The L5-20 is a 120v plug and the L6-20 is 240v.

                Paul
                Quite right, my apologies.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: changing to 220v ?

                  I have a Ridgid 0601 jointer, and 3660 TS. I converted both to 220 because I had already run 220 to my shop to power my compressor. Are they more powerful? No. The math isn't there, as one earlier poster pointed out. The real benefit is that if you are running anything else on 110 when you power on the above, it makes no difference to either the 220 item or the 110 items. No draw down, lights dimming, etc.
                  "non illegitimis carborundum"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: changing to 220v ?

                    anyone considered putting another ( more powerful ) motor on the 4511 ?
                    I have done this successfully in the past on another saw and it made a big difference , it is nice to be able to power through most material without bogging down .
                    I wonder if the 4511 bearings trunion etc will support more power ?
                    For now I will use the stock at 220 until the need arises then investigate
                    Larry

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: changing to 220v ?

                      Originally posted by larry posh View Post
                      anyone considered putting another ( more powerful ) motor on the 4511 ?
                      I have done this successfully in the past on another saw and it made a big difference , it is nice to be able to power through most material without bogging down .
                      I wonder if the 4511 bearings trunion etc will support more power ?
                      For now I will use the stock at 220 until the need arises then investigate
                      Larry
                      I haven't read of anyone doing a motor upgrade on the 4511 but I know that others have done it successfully with contractor saws. Because of the extra weight and torque on the trunnions/pulleys/bearings, I wouldn't suggest going with more than 2hp, which probably won't make as much of a difference as good alignment and a good thin kerf blade.

                      Comment

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