Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

R4511 Hard Maple

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • R4511 Hard Maple

    I have a Ridgid R4511 table saw and I’m trying to cut some hard maple on it.

    The maple is about 1” and 5/8 thick and about 20” long. I have a Forrest Woodworker II with a 40 tooth blade.

    What’s happening is when I get about 3/4 way through the board it starts to burn and then the blade stopped on me. I’ve tried running it through faster/slower and raising the blade as high as I’m comfortable with.

    Does anyone think that a 30 tooth blade would help me any? Maybe the saw is under powered for this? Or I’m still feeding too fast/slow?

    Thanks,

    marly

  • #2
    Re: R4511 Hard Maple

    I think a 24 tooth thin kerf blade would help you if you are ripping this board. Use a ripping blade.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: R4511 Hard Maple

      A rip blade may work better for this thickness of maple. Also did you joint the board first??

      Seems that thicker stock needs to have as straight a cut path as possible to avoid burning, so fence to blade alignment is critical and also a jointed edge and face to relieve any binding issues.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: R4511 Hard Maple

        Originally posted by ACP View Post
        I think a 24 tooth thin kerf blade would help you if you are ripping this board. Use a ripping blade.
        QFT.

        A thin kerf ripping blade will make all the difference in the world.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: R4511 Hard Maple

          Try another piece of maple. This one could have some stress from drying and it is binding up your blade.

          Red
          Red

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: R4511 Hard Maple

            Something is definitely wrong here!

            With a 40-tooth WoodWorker II blade and the power of the 4511, you should go through a piece of maple of that size, like a "hot knife through butter!"

            I've ripped 3/4 maple and oak on my Ryobi BT3100, using the 40-tooth stock blade and it did a great job. I just fed it at the speed acceptable to the blade (you can usually hear and feel when the blade is cutting efficiently.) I think, by comparison, my Ryobi is a real lightweight compared to the 4511.

            (Oops! I think I misinterpreted your "1” and 5/8 thick" as two different stock thicknesses... not 1-5/8 " thick, as you probably meant it. After reading Hewood's reply, I see the error of my interpretation and I agree that hard maple stock that is 1-5/8" thick would be taxing. But still, the 4511 is pretty brawny and I wonder if such stock should be be that demanding on this particular saw?)

            So, I think there's some merit to Cactus's post on internal stresses in the wood. It sounds very much like the kerf is closing and pinching the blade.

            Are you using the riving knive and are you paying attention to whether the stock is pinching the blade? (But, your stock is only 20-inches long... that isn't much, to cause a pinch that would stall the blade... unless of course you're really cramming the stock into the blade.... but you sound like you're too experienced to do that.)

            I'm not familiar with the drive system on the 4511, but I think it is belt-driven.... so how are the belts? Are they properly tightened, in good condition, and are the pulleys clean?

            Also, what is the condition of your blade? Sharp and clean/free of gum build-up, etc.

            I hope this helps,

            CWS
            Last edited by CWSmith; 06-16-2010, 04:48 PM. Reason: Clarification on MY misinterpretation!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: R4511 Hard Maple

              1-5/8" maple is pushing the limits of a 40T blade...especially if it's hard maple. Is your WWII a full kerf or thin kerf blade? A 1/8" full kerf blade is 33% thicker than a comparable 3/32" thin kerf. Good alignment of the blade to fence, straightness of the fence, and alignment of the riving knife are huge factors too. Flatness of the wood, moisture content, reactiveness of the wood, sharpness of the blade, cleanliness of the blade, blade kerf width, etc, are all possible variables along with the belts as CWS mentioned. Even the electrical supply to the motor is an important factor...long extension cords, long circuits, and other appliances running off the same circuit can all contribute to starving the motor of needed amperage.

              A good lower tooth thin kerf rip blade will have an easier time, but I'd definitely double check the other possible variables too.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: R4511 Hard Maple

                Thank you everyone for your responses.

                This afternoon I check a variety of things.

                My blade to fence and riving knife are about as good as I’m ever going to get it as far alignment. They were both almost dead on. The wood was pretty flat, maybe a 1/32” off or so. The blade was a brand new blade that I bought the day before so it’s fairly clean and should be very sharp.

                I checked into the electrical, I had the saw on a 6 foot 12 gauge extension cord. I took it off the extension cord and then I ran a test cut. The saw did seem like it hard more power so I decided to run a few more cuts through it, after a few cuts I blew the breaker.

                I know that particular outlet is about 75’ from the breaker box so I moved the saw to an outlet that is about 50’ feet from the breaker box. When I ran some cuts I could definitely tell the difference in power that the saw was putting out, and I still blew the breaker. I let everything sit for about 10 or 15 minutes and it seemed better and I didn’t blow the breaker.

                I have the saw on a 20 amp circuit with 10 gauge wire about 50’ from the breaker box. I’m wondering if I ran a new line and re-wired the saw for a 220 if that would make a difference or I’m wondering if perhaps there is something wrong with my motor.

                Thanks,

                marly

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: R4511 Hard Maple

                  Sounds to me like your stock may not be perfectly flat and when you get part way through it it tends to "rock" putting the blade into a slight bind. What I would do is run it across the jointer a couple times and then with care and with proper speed, cut the board.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: R4511 Hard Maple

                    Marly - Is your WWII full kerf or thin kerf?

                    Your saw shouldn't be throwing a breaker on a 20 amp circuit regularly. Are there any other devices running off the same circuit? Switching to 220v might have less voltage loss, which would give you faster start-ups and faster recovery times from bogging. No harm done if done correctly, and some possible benefits. You'll need a new plug for the saw and a new outlet box to match the plug. The motor schematic should be on the inside of the wire junction box on the motor.
                    Last edited by hewood; 06-17-2010, 05:03 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: R4511 Hard Maple

                      i just did a bunch of hard maple the same thickness for cutting boards and i went with a freud 24t rip blade in full kerf. I was all set to buy the thinkerf but the freud rep happened to be at the store that day and talked me into the full kerf. this being said I did have some burning to deal and i had to take my time and not rush it but all in all it performed well.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: R4511 Hard Maple

                        Just to educate me, how impractical would it be to make 2 cuts? Make the first at @ 1 inch and then the second cut at full height? More work, but is it unsafe in any way? If this is successful, what does that tell me?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: R4511 Hard Maple

                          Originally posted by amajors View Post
                          Just to educate me, how impractical would it be to make 2 cuts? Make the first at @ 1 inch and then the second cut at full height? More work, but is it unsafe in any way? If this is successful, what does that tell me?
                          That's a very practical way to cut thicker material if you have an underpowered saw or a blade with too many teeth. No real added risk, but the same probability gets two chances.

                          There are a number variables that can cause a saw to labor excessively....too small of a motor, voltage loss from the electrical supply, alignment issues, poor belt/pulley adjustments, poor blade selection, material that's too thick, wet, or binding, or any combination of those things. For best results, the saw should be well tuned, equipped with a proper blade and a stiff throat insert, ample electrical supply, and the material should be flat, straight, and dry.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: R4511 Hard Maple

                            I don’t think there would be much issue with make two cuts, however, for what I was using it for you don’t get a clean cut. I needed a clean cut without having to sand after I made the cut.

                            I do believe there is the right tool for the job and that the R4511 was under powered for what I was doing. I ended up purchasing a sawstop and it cut through the wood like a hot knife through butter. I struggled for days trying to get it right and the new saw cut through it and I was done in three minutes.

                            There is a significant difference between the two saws in power and I think there is an added safety benefit to that. It’s like the old wives tale, “Nobody cuts themselves with a sharp knife”. I think there’s a lot of truth to that. The more messing around you do and the more work arounds you do the more chance it seems something can screw up.

                            The R4511 is a great saw and it served me well for the little projects that I did in the past but I think I finally out grew it.

                            PS. I have a R4511 for sale.

                            marly

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: R4511 Hard Maple

                              Kind of comparing apples to oranges. Yea, they are both TS but that's about the end of the similarities. Saw Stop is an awesome saw but if your 4511 wouldn't cut 7/4 maple something is awry. Just yesterday I ripped some 12/4 Jatoba which is a much harder wood than any maple and had no trouble at all. Ripped it slowly, but it ripped it without stopping or bogging. BTW, I had a 24T rip blade on it. Actually it did start to bog a couple of times, I just slowed the feed rate down a bit more but kept feeding a steady rate. Seriously, something had to be messed up for the 4511 NOT to rip that maple. Glad you are enjoying the SS and congrats on the purchase. I'd love to have one down the road a bit.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X