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  • Zero Clearance throat plates.

    O.K. guys- Not long ago I saw a post (I don't remember if it was here or not) about the Ridgid TS2424 and TS2412 and their poor inability to make a zero-clearance throat plate. The saw blade won't lower enough to get under the throat plate blank so it can be pushed up through it. Someone asked if Ridgid was providing zero-clearance throat plates, and the answer was no....
    My question- since Ridgid use to be Craftsman, does anyone know if Craftsman makes a zero clearance throat plate for these saws?
    Greg

  • #2
    There are a number of aftermarket throat plates availible. Any plate that's listed to fit Craftsman will also fit the RIDGID. Look in Rockler, Woodworkers supply, or Woodcraft for these aftermarket plates. Most aftermarket plates have a slot milled in them to fit over the blade.

    Jake

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    • #3
      When you make your zero clearance plate, pull it back out and V groove the underside using a router to releave the blade. This way you can use the same throat plate for bevel cuts up to 20 degrees. Be sure to approach this carefully however, some things work better for some people and not so well for others.

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      • #4
        The easy way to handle this is to install a blade from your portable power saw (7 1/2 " )and make the initial cut with it. Don't go all the way through the new insert, just enough to permit your 10 " blade to fit. Simple and easy. I hope Ridgid fixes this vexing situation, it should be easy.

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        • #5
          The zero-clearence plate your looking for is carryed by woodworkers supply. IT's item # 95-610 the cost is 16.95 the S&H. I ordered onr from them and it workes fine. I know thw problem with the blade not lowering enouff. What I did was this ( please be very careful). I set the front of the plate in place, I started the saw and pressed the the rear of the plate untill it sat flush with the table. Then I moved the ripfence over the plate and turned the blade to it full hight. It may not be the safest way but it worked for me, be sure to wear your eye protection. I hope this helps. Woodworkers Supply Can be reached at 1-800-645-9292. They dont have a web sight. I done a good deal of bis with them and I've been very happy with the service.
          Regards Daniel Maloney

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          • #6
            A slightly safer way even than Daniel's is to lower the blade all the way, place the insert in, and clamp a piece of scrap to the front of the table only, that extends all the way over the plate. When you start the saw, it will kerf right into the plate.

            I wouldn't trust a pre-kerfed insert, it wouldn't really be zero clearance.

            Dave

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            • #7
              This idea is the one I think I will try. What keeps the plate from being thrown by the blade if a tooth catches it? I might be trying to cut plywood, and the fence won't be over the plate to hold it down.


              Greg

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              • #8
                Nothing but gravity holds mine in, and I've not had a problem with it lifting. It is a moderately tight fit.

                If you want better safety (admirable in my book ), use the same method as the stock insert. Fabricate a clip for the back, and screw the front down. Then, it is really unlikely to go anywhere on you.

                Dave

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                • #9
                  The only part of your insert that has to be zero clearance is the top face, a good 1/8" should be strong enough. You can route the underside as explained earlier and install the pin at the back as the original probably did. The front will not pull up since there is incredible force in the opposite direction. Make a seperate insert for the different kerfs and mark them. When you raise the blade (with a solid board above it clamped) go all the way up slowly. This will eliminate the possibilty of raising it into the uncut insert plate material which would cause it to become a projectile. Jim

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