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  • Pin Nailer

    Any experience with the Ridgid pin nailer?

  • #2
    Re: Pin Nailer

    None with the Ridgid, but I've been using the $25 Harbor Freight pin nailer for 3 years now. I haven't had any problems with it.

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    • #3
      Re: Pin Nailer

      No experience with the Pin Nailer (I have a Porter Cable). But, I have had one of the Ridgid Finish Nailers for quite a while and have had no issues.

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      • #4
        Re: Pin Nailer

        The ridgid pin nailer rocks. I mean, I haven't used any others, but I restored an old entryway, and put in the trim around the glass with the pin nailer. The entry holes are so small, I didn't need to do anything to them to finish the project. I heartily endorse this product.

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        • #5
          Re: Pin Nailer

          yup - I am very pleased with the Ridgid pin nailer. I've used it for numerous furniture projects (mostly for tacking on trim before while the glue dries). The pin holes are very easy to conceal, as they are very tiny (23 guage i think).

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          • #6
            Re: Pin Nailer

            Sounds like a good nailer to have. I may have to look into one.

            Red
            Red

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            • #7
              Re: Pin Nailer

              Just bought one for $59 on sale. Tried it out on 3/4 maple with a 1" pin. Did great. I also have the 16 gauge finish nailer and a Boatotch 18 gauge brad nailer. I have fired 3 or 4 thousand nails and brads with no jams - knock on wood. Didn't know you could use the HF coupon at HD...... Darn.

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              • #8
                Re: Pin Nailer

                I have the Harbor Freight nailer and it was ok for a couple of months and for some reason it started acting up and the PC just happened to be on sale and it works great. I purchased the Ridgid 3/8" to 1 1/2" stapler and it is a great piece of equipment.

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                • #9
                  Re: Pin Nailer

                  I have had a ridgid brad nailer for 4 years, still kicking and bought another one with the pin nailer. I have used senco, bostich, pasload, and PC and I personally would never go back. Ridgid nailers are really just Milwaukee clones in Orange paint.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Pin Nailer

                    I'm in the market for a pinner. I looked at the web page on the Ridgid and it said that it "might not" drive pins longer than 1-3/16 all the way in denser woods.

                    Huh? To me that means it's a 1-3/16 pinner. I like to spray the finish my hardwood molding before it goes up, so trying to get a half-driven pin out is way too scary.

                    They're a lot more money, but it looks like a Grex or maybe a Cadex for me. All the reviews I've seen say that they'll drive the long pins underflush in hardwoods, no problem.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Pin Nailer

                      Andy, are you talking about the brad nailer or the pin nailer(23g)? I never use any pin nails longer than 1" and it sinks them fine in maple. If I need longer than that I don't personally trust the headless pinner and op for the brad nailer and it easily drives a 2" nail into maple.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Pin Nailer

                        It's the 23g pinner. I have an 18g brad nailer too, which will also do 2" in hardwood. But that thing leaves an ugly little rectangular hole to deal with - not so good for finished trim.

                        I was a little afraid of the little 23g pins, too. A friend showed me that if you drive pins in pairs at slight opposing angles, they're very secure - which makes perfect sense. Of course, driving the pins at an angle means you need an even longer pin. Grex and a few others have 1-3/4" and 2", but I think I can get by with 1-3/8 for most if not all of the molding I'm using.
                        Last edited by Andy_M; 04-15-2011, 12:01 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Pin Nailer

                          You need to be careful using long pins and shooting at an angle. Pretty common for the pins to curve back out of the material.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Pin Nailer

                            Originally posted by tomapple View Post
                            You need to be careful using long pins and shooting at an angle. Pretty common for the pins to curve back out of the material.
                            Depends on the material, it's usually the wood grain that causes pins and brads to curve. If you're shooting into MDF, for example, I've never had a curve, there's just no variance in the material. Hard woods and especially those with tight grain would seem to me to be more of a problem, although I've never done a test to see which are more prone to curving a pin.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Pin Nailer

                              Yes, that is all true. Just that longer 23ga pins are more susceptible to the problem. I don't have a 2" pin nailer, but I would be leary about shooting cross grain with one using 2" pins. I would dang sure keep my fingers out of range.

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