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  • ts3612....1st Impressions

    The cast iron is rougher than a cobb, the Blanchard grinder left quite a bad surface. The Herculift system is practically useless, it raises the saw about 1/4" off the floor, so any imperfections in the floor will snag the levelers and make the saw immovable. The assembly time involved is insane.(Gee, they could have assembled something for 600 bucks) The B&D bt2500 I returned to Lowes had much more power and a much smoother table top. I can't seem to get the tilt indicator anywhere near 0 deg. or 45 deg. When I got it home the frame rails box was missing (box 2 of 2)so that involved another 70 mile trip.
    I know this saw is highly rated, and who knows, maybe I'll learn to love it. But right now I wish I had my B&D back.
    Buy American....if you can

  • #2
    Hate to hear of your troubles with the TS3612. I have not had any of the problems you mentioned. The assembly did take a while, but that was half the fun of it.
    Alan
    My Shop

    Comment


    • #3
      Sorry you're having troubles but I gotta take exception to the motor statement and a couple of other points. The 3 hp B&D claims is 'max developed' power. This is the contrive hp rating to begin with and really means nothing. The amp rating is exactly the same as the 3612. Also the B&D is a direct drive motor right? The belt drive will power through hardwood a lot easier than the universal motor on the B&D. The Ridgid also weighs almost twice as much as the B&D...you'll find that handy when you finally get used to the saw. You'll realize the extra heft makes for a much smoother saw under load. The stops for the 45 and 90 degree marks can be a bear to get right (although mine didn't require any work), but you can get it set right with a little patience unless there's a flaw in the adjustments....HD will trade it if it has a problem.

      I do agree that the levelers hang the list system up on an uneven floor, I've had that problem as well. The top might be a bit rougher than most...not sure what can be done about that.

      All in all, the saw is vastly superior to the B&D. I looked the B&D over the other day...not bad for a bench saw on legs, but I wouldn't think it would last the many years a full size contractor saw would.
      Kelly C. Hanna<br /><a href=\"http://www.hannawoodworks.com\" target=\"_blank\">Hanna Woodworks</a>

      Comment


      • #4
        I just finished assembling my 3612 last week and, granted, it took some time (6.5 hours for me), but I learned more about the saw, and how to tune it, this way.

        So far I love the saw and the lift. I have a wavy (90+ year old house) basement floor and once I set the levelers I had no problems moving the saw around.

        As for the missing rails, they (or you) should have noticed the box said 1 of 2 and they (or you) should have grabbed the second box. Bummer about the 70 mile trip.

        So far I love the saw. I'm sure you'll like it too.

        Michael

        Comment


        • #5
          Geez modelmaker,
          If I were that disgruntled with a $600.00 purchase, then I would take it back and get a refund. How can you ever learn to love something when it has you yanked off enough to bash it on your first posting? This forum is here to help you with your new piece of equipment. All you need to do is ask...
          I agree the top is a little rougher than some but with a scotch brite pad and a few good waxing's, it is pretty nice.
          The Herc-u-lift wasn't meant to drive over gravel or harsh surfaces. I haven’t seen too many mobile bases that lift there equipment much or any at all higher. My 18” Jet bandsaw with Shopfox base is no higher.
          The zero to 45 degree indicator is not that difficult to adjust. First get the saw squared with the world and the degree stop set screws set and then adjust your degree pointer. Not a big deal. It's tweak able...
          Seems like HD goofed up in not making sure you got box 2 of 2... They did the same to me. Just got to have some patients. It's a human mistake... You would not want Ridgid to cut your fence guides in half and put them in the main box. One piece guides are the only true way to go…
          The BT2500 has more power? If you search this and many other websites you will notice that HP ratings are probably contrived and bogus. I would take a belt drive 1-1/2hp over a direct drive any day...
          The TS1236 is a very high quality precision long lasting saw that takes time and attention to detail to set up. If this is not your cup of tea, then I would say the saw is out of your usage category... If you’re looking for a quick setup with over the road tires, I would look at the TS2400ls on the jobsite base...

          The warranty on the Ridgid is gads better than that of the B&D. In my opinion there is not much of a comparison between the BT2500 and the TS1236…
          Regards,<br /><br />Big Johnson<br /><br />Pictures: <a href=\"http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php</a>

          Comment


          • #6
            Big Johnson, I calls em like I see's em. Whether this is my first post or my 50th is irrelevant, my subject line stated that this is my first impression. Granted, this saw is better than the B&D (but not much) Considering the price difference the quality should be much better. You can defend poor quality all you want, but don't expect me to.

            [ 10-31-2002, 01:18 AM: Message edited by: modelmaker ]
            Buy American....if you can

            Comment


            • #7
              i have the ts3612 too. it took me about a day to get the saw set up out of the box. the top on mine is very smooth, and i had no problems setting up the tilt indicator. my herculift system work extremely well after a few minor adjustments to the height using the nuts and bolts provided. about the second box thing-dang that was stupid of you or the home depot folks, but hey if you noticed it does say 1 of 2 not 1 of 1 on the table saw box. but hey everybody makes mistakes, but i assure you buying the TS3612 was not one of them. hope it all works out.
              Godspeed and wear those safety glasses...

              Comment


              • #8
                the only problem i have found with mine is that i wasnt that impressed with the blade. so i spent 600.00 on the saw, and 75.00 on a blade. world of difference. as far as the herculift, mine snaggs up a bit when i try to wheel mine out of the garage on a nice sunny day, because my driveway is uneven! As far as the pointer goes, mine is not accurate either! but i never go by it anyway. a always set my blade up with a precision square for 45 and 90's. as far as anything inbetween, i bust out my mighty bevel gague.

                it is my opinion that this saw is among the best on the market in is price range. assembly was a bit indepth but the video tape helped a lot. i am not very mechanically inclined at all. i would have gladly paid home depot an extra few bucks to assemble and set it up for me. but they do not provide that service as of yet.

                i personally love the top and the fence is awesome! i couldnt be happier with mine.
                \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                • #9
                  Sorry about the trouble you've had. I would be just as mad if it were me. However, my assembly went well, except for a couple of minor problems. And I really got to know that saw--inside and out! Woodworker99, how did you adjust the height on your lift? I've got a pretty rough basement floor and the levelers do hang up once in awhile.
                  Dusty

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The TS2424 and TS3612 saws I have had experience with seem like super pieces of equipment. I have looked at many before buying and I would take either hands down over any near price point saws.

                    The Herculift is a bit of a challenge to get tweaked right but the answer seems to be to put the locknuts on the lift to leg bracket bolts with only a thread or so showing above the nut. Adjust the leveling feet so that they are retracted as far as they will go. Then with the lift lowered adjust the feet down only the minimum required to steady/level the saw. The nut on the top of the leveler bolts should be run down enough to keep the feet from dropping down when the lift is raised to keep them from dragging. I guess you could pay a lot more for a system that does not work nearly as well.

                    The tilt indicator is kind of a rough guide but will bend to just about any adjustment you would like if you follow the instructions.

                    Having put two together I am aware of how much time it takes and cannot see any retailer or manufacturer assembling such a product without severe price implications, not to mention storage problems.

                    The saw table surfaces I have seen do have milling marks but they are consistent and sure do not seem to be a problem.

                    The burr between you and the saddle must have been real active on your 70 mile ride to get your box 2 of 2 that you and HD personnel should have got the first time. I hope things go better for you from now on but looking for answers rather than venting seems to work better for most of us.

                    Good luck and chill out.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I don't have the TS3612 but I do have the TS2412 to which I just added the Herculift to. and I LOVE it. The trick is to use a little common sense. The bolts holding the lift to the corner brackets should NOT be tight. They are only supposed to hold the assembly and they are supposed to be loose enough to allow the main assembly some free movement. The lift should not be ridgid (no pun intended) unless it's engaged. To avoid the catching of the leveling feet, retract them all as far as they can go maintaining level while the lift is disengaged. Problem solved. At least in my case it was.

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                      • #12
                        nursedusty exactly like bob s says see above. you need to make sure the wheels won't drag on the floor and extend all the way up when the saw is sitting on the stand feet. also if the feet are still dragging just use the nuts on the feet to adjust the feet up as high as possible and still allowing the saw to be level. nuttin' to it. good luck
                        Godspeed and wear those safety glasses...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Modelmaker

                          I would not take any offense to the attitude of some of the replies you received, I find it refreshing to see opinions such as yours, some of the woodworkers that post on this site seem to have taken on a Ridgid groupie status. I can truly say that you will find there is a vast amount of woodworking knowledge and experience available on this site to tap into. I also spent a considerable amount of time assembling my TS, but found it resulted in one smooth running saw. Upon completing assembly, (and much to my amazement) it immediately passed the nickel, penny and dime test. It is unfortunate that Ridgid is only available through HD, I find it more common than not that you end up dealing with someone as incompetent as the salesman that neglected to give you box 2 of 2. If you can’t get satisfaction with your local HD (70 miles away) call Ridgid Customer Service, I encountered a problem with my TS and they shipped a replacement part out no questions asked. Hope things work out for you.

                          Woodslayer

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                          • #14
                            as far as the customer service and lifetime warranty, those are big selling points. you wont find another saw, in this category, with the same warranty and painless customer service.

                            shortly after buying my table saw i bought a ridgid jointer. had a hell of a time setting it up (as this was my 1st time and i am a terrible mechanic). while troubleshooting i found one of my blades to be cracked lenghtwise almost 3/4 the way thru. when i contacted ridgid, they sent me out a new set of blades no questions asked. they did not even ask for the cracked blade (which i inquired about and would have willingly sent). that is awesome service from a company that stands behind their product. hard to find these days.

                            i know this got off the TS topic, but i felt it does apply from the customer service standpoint.

                            bottom line is that a finer contractor saw this size can not be found elsewhere for the money. the lifetime guarantee is the only one (i am aware of) in the business.

                            good luck with your saw

                            ed
                            \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Modelmaker,

                              Sorry to hear you are disappointed with your saw. Let me address a couple issues and see if we can get them resolved.

                              First the Herc-U-Lift. My recommendation would be to make sure the leveling feet are almost all the way retracted into the legs. This should yield another 1/4" to 1/2" lift. In most cases the Herc-U-Lift should lift the unit between 1/2" and 3/4".

                              As far as the power goes, make sure your blade is in alignment. This can have a very significant effect on how much power the saw feels like it has.

                              Finally, the bevel indicator can be a bit tricky. First loosen the screw holding the bevel indicator and move it to align with the zero degree mark. If the pointer does not reach, bend the end slightly to reach the 0º mark. Once you have the zero indicator lined up, bevel the saw to 45º. Most likely the pointer will read 43-44º. Loosen the upper screw on the scale and move the upper end of the scale downward. If you do not have enough travel on the upper screw, loosen the lower scale screw and move it the opposite direction. This should be enough to bring it into alignment. I realize aligning this scale can be frustrating, but it can be done. It is important that you check the reading on the scale after you've made any adjustments to the blade heal, since it can effect the readout on the scale (I wonder how they do it on saws where the bevel scale is a decal?)

                              Hope this helps, if not let me know.

                              Jake

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