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TS2424 angle stops

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  • TS2424 angle stops

    I've had the 2424 for a little over a year now and am pleased with it. I'd be even happier with it if I could figure how to get more positive stops at 90° and 45°. The OEM stops are decidedly mushy.

  • #2
    Mr. Butcher I’m glad your happy with the TS2424 but I'd like to clarify something. The stops themselves are not mushy. Those are steel upon cast-iron. What happens is when you hit the stop the side of the house begins to flex giving the mushy feeling. Once you feel the bevel hand wheel get tight you are at the stop, no matter how much more you crank. What I normally do is crank until I feel additional resistance in the handwheel, then turn another 1/4 turn. but no more.

    Jake

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    • #3
      Thx Jake, I'll give it a shot.

      One other thing. I've heard lots of yea/nay re the fence on various forums & reviews. I like it personally. I just set it, square it, and cut -- on the money. The convenient slots lend themselves to being an excellent platform for attaching jigs; but no one stocks the square-head bolts. Does Ridgid recommend 1/4 -20 bolts, or 3/8 doctored on the grinder. Better yet, how about a source for the square heads?

      Comment


      • #4
        You can slide a 1/4-20 bolt in those slots, but beware, if you tighten the bolt to the point it spins in the slot (which under extreme circumstance can happen) you'll have a lot of work to do to get that bolt removed.

        The square head bolts can be purchased from www.ridgidparts.com The part number is 159653-3

        Jake

        Comment


        • #5
          Woodbutcher,

          I recently found those parts listed on this website. Go to the parts page and pull up parts for the TS2424. Click on "fence" and you will find the square head bolt and associated washer and hex nut listed along with the price and part numbers. As I mentioned in another thread recently, I have not yet ordered these parts but it appears to be available. You should have ended up however with (3) square head bolts after saw assembly. I wanted several sets for several fences and I didn't want to remove the bolts every time I changed fences. Hope this helps.

          Wood Dog

          Sorry!!!!!!
          I sent my response before I saw Jake's.

          [ 02-20-2002: Message edited by: Wood Dog ]

          Comment


          • #6
            Jake: Isn't it fair to say that the 0- and 45-degree tilt stops are there as much to protect the tilt mechanism as to provide guides for beveling? In addition to the mushiness that you refer to -- which is only in the control, not in the resulting set -- there has got to be some histeresis in both the tilt drive and (to a lesser extent) in the threads of the set screws; not to mention the possibility of a false "bottom" on account of sawdust or debris. I would think it SOP that one always used a triangle, T-gauge, or some other reference before cutting a bevel angle. For angles that I'm going to use repetitively, I've found that I can cut little triangles out of scrap hardwood with terrific precision on my MS1250.

            Comment


            • #7
              Woodbutcher
              I dont know if you have checked your local phone book. I live in Hampton VA. There is a place here that sells nothing but bolts. I was looking for some square head bolts a few years back and they carryed them. You may find a place like that in your area. Also If the bolts were mising from your saw call Ridgid and let then know I know they will send them out to you.
              Dan<br /> <a href=\"http://community.webshots.com/user/pepaw101\" target=\"_blank\">http://community.webshots.com/user/pepaw101</a>

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              • #8
                Gotcha Jake! I'm on my way to the Ridgid store for the bolts.

                Thanks, all you cellulose artisans.

                With that kind of response, I'll have to call you for the next barn-raising (c;.

                Comment


                • #9
                  <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by RGad:
                  Jake: Isn't it fair to say that the 0- and 45-degree tilt stops are there as much to protect the tilt mechanism as to provide guides for beveling? In addition to the mushiness that you refer to -- which is only in the control, not in the resulting set -- there has got to be some histeresis in both the tilt drive and (to a lesser extent) in the threads of the set screws; not to mention the possibility of a false "bottom" on account of sawdust or debris. I would think it SOP that one always used a triangle, T-gauge, or some other reference before cutting a bevel angle. For angles that I'm going to use repetitively, I've found that I can cut little triangles out of scrap hardwood with terrific precision on my MS1250.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                  I'd have to disagree; the stops that are provided on the saws can be used with enough precision for any type of woodworking. Yes there is always the possibility that the stops could get sawdust or other types of interference, but its very unlikely. What do some of the rest of you guys think?

                  Jake

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hello Jake,
                    I agree Jake that once the stops have been properly set they are solid. You just have to remember not to crank the wheels much further past snug less you bow the side of the housing. However I find it hard to see how any bevel scale on any tablesaw could be trusted 100%. The slight problem of visual parallax. The stops are perfectly fine for 90 and 45 degree cuts but anything in between I would use some sort of angle measuring gauge to be absolutely sure. See ya.
                    Gregg

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Jake,

                      I have come to trust the stops but I'll admit I checked quite often at first. I still do on critical cuts but have not had any problems with angle accuracy at 90 or 45. To Gregg's point, the angle indicator and scale have too much separation to be used accurately. I would assume it is only intended to get you in the "ball park". With the awkward angle you are in when reading the scale along with the slight interference from the wheel its hard to keep your line of sight perpendicular to the scale and indicator. The potential parallax distortion on my saw can be a degree or more. Closing the gap between the indicator and the scale would decrease the potential for reading error but again I'm not sure I would try to depend on it. I think that's where a good set of measuring tools come in to play and even then, if the angles are that critical, I'll always test cut and verify. Proofs in the pudding

                      Honestly the vast majority of my cuts are 90 anyway. Most of the others are 45 with only a few at some other angle so its not a big deal for me.

                      Wood Dog

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'd be the first to admit that no table bevel scale is very good. I think many people rely on a some sort of seperate measuring device to to make sure the cut is accurate at off angles.

                        Jake

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I occasionally do helpout duty at a woodworking store. A fellow commented on a particular saw's "poor bevel indicator". I took him over to the most expensive saw in the store, a $2200 Powermatic 66, and asked "is this one any better?" He had to admit, no.

                          Some of the ultra-expensive European saws have digital readouts for bevel. An inexpensive digital readout costs more than a Ridgid TS2424.

                          Dave

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Product innovation creates points of differentiation which in turn separates good companies from great companies. Ultimately it separates those that survive and prosper in the future and those that do not. If everyone were happy with "that's the way we've always done it" there would certainly be little motivation for improvement. Pointing out the inherent weaknesses in the bevel scale is not an attack on the product but could be viewed as a potential opportunity......maybe, maybe not. As stated and agreed upon, not many saws currently on the market have a scale any better regardless of price. We all tend to accept this until someone comes along with an innovative approach and a new benchmark is set. Complacency can be a disease in corporate thinking. Sometimes a company needs to look beyond their competition and even beyond the boundaries of their own industry. When too many guys start offering the same thing and too few points of differentiation exist, therein is the opportunity. I believe Ridgid has found the proper value proposition and market niche for now and is being rewarded for their efforts. But they must remember as I'm sure they do, the competition is always gaining ground. Ridgid may have delivered a wake up call to the industry but they can also be sure that the competition will respond.

                            I really didn't intend this to be a rant and I'm certainly not accusing anyone of being complacent. I guess I'm just a little sensitive when I hear anything that sounds the least little bit like "if it aint broke don't fix it" or "that's the way we've always done it." It's just so easy now a days to lose whatever competitive edge you have. Having a forum like this and the participation is a great way to connect with the consumer. The participation is a testament to how positive the reaction is. My hats off to Ridgid but please remember, the consumer appreciates what you did for them yesterday but is even more interested in what you will do for them tomorrow.


                            Wood Dog

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hey: Back around 15 years ago Emerson DID make a Ts and Ras with digital readout. by the time I could afford one, they discontinued them. Mebbe they ought to bring "em back. My 2 cents. Dawg
                              He who dies with the most power tools wins!

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