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Proper planing technique?

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  • Proper planing technique?

    I just recently picked up my first planer TP1300 and went through the user manual but it doesn't really cover too much in how to actually use it. I've ran a couple of boards as a test run but noticed that it's hard to feed the stock once the height is set. It seems like it's getting caught on the cut guage when trying to feed the stock through the infeed table. I didn't want to force it so what I did is raise the cutter head and drop it back down once the wood is under the cut guage. I know this isn't right but I really didn't want to force it in. Anyone else experience this problem? Do I just need to push a little harder to get it pass the cut guage? Any feedback on this would be helpful. Thanks as always.

  • #2
    How did you set the depth of cut?
    Before you turn on the planer slide the board (assuming it is reasonably flat) up to the depth of cut gauge (in the middle of the in feed table) and set the depth of cut - no more than a 16th of an inch. The auto feeders should do the rest. It would be quite dangerous to lower the blades onto the surface of the stock.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the response Farenheit. That's exactly what I did. The problem I'm having is after setting the depth of cut and locking the cutter head position if I push the board it runs through fine but if the board is backed out and and I try to run it through it looks like the depth of cut gauge drops back down and blocks the board from going through. I figure if I want repeatibility I should be able to not have to re-adjust the cutter head position before each board.

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      • #4
        This is how I use my TP1300.
        I find the thickest board of the group I am going to plane
        I lower the heads down until the thickness indicator barely touches the board. The Indicator is the spring loaded ball in the center on the infeed side
        I send the board through the planer, sometimes taking very little off. I put the rest of the boards through at the same thickness.
        Then I drop the cutter 1/64" or 1/32" depending on the hardness and width of the boards I am planing. I do this until all boards are their final thickness.
        John

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        • #5
          Some tips that may be usefull:

          Using calipers when planing is a good idea. Feed the wood (with the grain) and stack them in the same direction every time. On longer boards it is good to place just a little uppward pressure on the outfeed to reduce snipe.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ryan.s:
            I just recently picked up my first planer TP1300 and went through the user manual but it doesn't really cover too much in how to actually use it. I've ran a couple of boards as a test run but noticed that it's hard to feed the stock once the height is set. It seems like it's getting caught on the cut guage when trying to feed the stock through the infeed table. I didn't want to force it so what I did is raise the cutter head and drop it back down once the wood is under the cut guage. I know this isn't right but I really didn't want to force it in. Anyone else experience this problem? Do I just need to push a little harder to get it pass the cut guage? Any feedback on this would be helpful. Thanks as always.
            Hi Ryan. Is the dust control collector installed on your planer? If it's not installed the cutter head will lock in position. I don't know if this is even covered in my owners manual but the planer came with a supplement that covers the dust collector (AC8640)

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