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Killed my RS1000!

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  • Killed my RS1000!

    I decided to change my RAS (RIDGID RS 1000) over to 220V, and while I had the cover off to flip the switch, I blew it out with compressed air. When I put it back together, all was not well. There's a low frequency vibration, and it gets warm quite quickly. When it's up to speed (which takes longer than before), it sounds like a tablesaw with a slack belt, a rhythmic slow vibration. Previously it had been smooth as glass. I tried a cut, and it bogged in 3/4 ply after about 4 inches.

    I took both halves of the motor cover off, and tried again to blow it out. I put it back to 110, still the same, proving it wasn't the 220V changeover. Taking it apart again, I dismantled the centrifugal switch, although that didn't seem to be the issue, it does spin up to full speed, though it bogs easily.

    The motor seems to be binding a little, I think what's probably happened is one of the bearings has moved ever so slightly off true. I can't imagine how compressed air has done that, but that's the only thing I did of a mechanical nature to it. When I stand in front of the blade, and look dead-on at it, as the motor spins down, I can see the blade flutter. This seems to give evidence to my supposition that a bearing is off.

    No parts are available, according to RIDGID.

    Anyone know the equivalent Craftsman model to the RS1000? My thoughts are to buy a used one, and rehome the motor. And be very gentle when cleaning it!

  • #2
    Re: Killed my RS1000!

    http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1111

    this thread has some sears comparisons, look at post 14 in the thread, there are some sears numbers that are said to be similar, (I my self have no idea what is similar or equivalent,
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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    • #3
      Re: Killed my RS1000!

      Thanks BHD!

      It seems the 113.196421 model is the same (motor at least), but sadly, many of the parts aren't available, including #61 (same part in the RIDGID breakdown!), which is the motor assy.

      Now I just have to find a 113.196421 on Craigslist!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Killed my RS1000!

        Roadster,

        Funny, I was just in my local (Corning area) HD a week or so ago and a gentleman was bringing in an RS1000 (the "gray" unit). Since I hadn't seen one in the store for quite some time, I inquired the next day at the service desk to see what was going on with that. The manager told me that they sent it in for service.

        I was quite surprised as I had been told (and passed it on here) that Home Depot did not handle service in any way. Apparently they will ship the tool to an authorized service center, according the service desk manager.

        I have a 1974 Craftsman (Emerson-made), that I cleaned up about four back in 2003 or 2004. It had sat in my damp basement for well over a decade. (Wrapped up, but still there was a lot of moldy sawdust and dead spiders in the motor.) I disassemble it right down to removing the armature. It went back together without a problem, but I manual rotated the motor before I ever plugged it in, just to make sure all was well.

        Perhaps you could disassemble it again and check for wear or signs that something is not properly positioned. I would be surprised if your efforts have totally killed it, probably just something out of place.

        Good luck,

        CWS

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        • #5
          Re: Killed my RS1000!

          are there any shops that do electrical motor repair in your area, they may be able to see what is wrong with it, I think it may be very simple as well,
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Killed my RS1000!

            Thanks for the replies guys. I have it a bit further apart now. I managed to get the roll pin out of the arbor but, and the arbor nut is now off. It looks to me though as if the blade end bearing is mounted in the end cap (which is moveable), and so my issue is probably alignment of the armature shaft.

            I don't think it's within my capability to get the bearing off, it is a very tight press fit, so removing the armature doesn't seem possible without the ability to remove the bearing (ie the appropriate bearing puller).

            When I tried centering the armature in the motor body, it no longer worked at all. No doubt the armature was grounded against the body. The clearance around the armature seems minimal, maybe 1/32. I'm thinking of using strips of plastic sheet (like the old overhead slides) to space the armature from the housing, then tighten the long through bolts.

            If that doesn't work, then it would be the motor shop. When I spoke to the guy, he's saying $100-200 as a minimum. Add that to the $185 I paid, and I'm 2/3 of the way to a new Craftsman without any of these issues and a warranty. That Craftsman seems very similar, which surprises me, I thought Emerson/Ridgid/TTI/OWT had discontinued RASs.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Killed my RS1000!

              Sorry you are having this trouble. My 1974 RAS is absolutely my favorite tool, and I can't imagine being without it. (Actually bought a second one a couple of years ago, just for spare parts.)

              While you are right in that Emerson/Ridgid/TTI no longer markets the RAS, I do believe that they do make the Craftsman model and have for decades now. IMO, the Craftsman is still one of the leading retailers of RAS and is at probably the lowest price-point in the market place. It would be interesting to know how many of these get sold each year.

              In the same light, I do know that while Ryobi (part of TTI and OWT) hasn't marketed their BT3100 table saw or thier 18-inch Scroll Saw under their own brand in several years, it can still be found wearing the Craftsman badge and is a popular seller.

              CWS

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Killed my RS1000!

                CWS - I'm with you, I've lost my favorite tool!

                Can you remember how you centered the rotor/armature in the stator when you rebuilt yours? This seems to be the critical part.

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                • #9
                  Re: Killed my RS1000!

                  is your saw orange or gray? if gray, it's probalby covered by the lifetime warranty. if it is gray, i'd put it back together as carefully as possible, call ridgid CS to confirm that, based on serial number, it's guaranteed and then i'd take it into an authorized repair center for a free fix.
                  there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Killed my RS1000!

                    It's gray, but I called RIDGID and enquired about this. It's covered against manufacturing defects only, not wear and tear.

                    In any case, there are no parts available, according to RIDGID CS, so I don't think that would fly anyway. There ARE a few parts for the comparable Craftsman model, but not many of the motor bits.

                    I may have another solution though, I found a Craftsman on Craigslist that is the same model, so for $150, that seems like my best bet.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Killed my RS1000!

                      Roadster,

                      I am hoping details wrong (it was in winter or 2003, IIRC); but as I recall, once I removed the clamshell plastic case (entire assembly removed from the arm and on the bench), I then removed the rear-mounted brake components, and then the long stator bolts which retained the front bearing support plate.

                      The rotor/armature simply pulled out with the front with the front wrap-around bearing housing. I do not recall having to pull apart the bearings with any kind of tool (I don't own a bearing puller, anyway) I do recall checking the winding, the external area of the rotor and internal area of the stator for wear, debris, etc.

                      Basically, the thing just slid back together, with rotor slipping into the front housing and then that assembly positioned through the stator and slipping into the rear bearing. Once positioned, it was simply a matter of aligning the bolt holes and re-positioning the four long retaining bolts that pass through the front bearing housing, throught the stator and rear bearing housing and then held in place with the hex nuts.

                      There really wasn't any "adjustment", as the fore and aft bearings are solidly held in thier respective housings and the four "stator" bolts just hold the entire motor assembly together.

                      Once re-assembled, I turned the rotor by hand (using a wrench on the armature/blade mounting nuts, IIRC). Feeling that everything was smooth, I then "plugged it in" through my bench test lead and toggled the switch on and off for a moment, and once observing that there were no negative effects, I then toggled the switch and let it run for a few seconds to ensure there was no vibration or negative-sounding noise.

                      CWS

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                      • #12
                        Re: Killed my RS1000!

                        Thanks for taking the time to write that up!

                        I will give it a try shortly. I'm fearful of removing the centrifugal switch/brake assy, as it has some delicate plastic dogs on it, but it seems like the other end isn't an option.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Killed my RS1000!

                          Well I managed to get the thing apart, and found nothing untoward. I put it back together, and the rotor was spinning freely. When I reconnected it, it just sat there dead, no humming, no nothing.

                          I put it back to 110, and then it hummed, but nothing else. I assumed it was the start windings or capacitor, and spun it by hand, and it did run, but slowly. After 5 seconds, the dreaded white smoke came out. I tested the capacitor, it seems OK, so that leaves me with the windings. It's probably tostada, and to be honest, I have spent several hundred dollars of my time on the thing by now, if I were charging.

                          There's the equivalent model Craftsman on CL here for $165, and I will cut my losses, and go get that. I may even be able to talk them down a bit. The RIDGID is in excellent pre-event condition, so I will probably put the motor on the RIDGID. If the C-man is even better, then I'll keep it as is. The annoying thing is, as I dismantled the saw, I was actually quite impressed with its construction. All thickly cast alloy on the arm, I had expected steel. The steel's only for the top cover. At least I'll have a source of parts!

                          Thanks to all who helped, time to draw a line under this and go get a well deserved beer.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Killed my RS1000!

                            Follow-up on my post #4 of this thread... regarding the RS1000 that I had seen a couple of weeks ago at my local Corning Home Depot.

                            At that time, I saw this gentleman wheeling it in to the service desk. Not wanting to "get in the way", I asked about it the following day. Apparently he was bringing it in for "service". I was a bit surprised, as I didn't think HD handled that kind of thing anymore... but the lady at the desk assured me that they did.

                            So today was in the store and there sat the RW1000, with a return ticket on it. I don't know why they bothered, because nothing was marked or checked on the ticket... but I did ask at the service desk as to what had been done.

                            Apparently nothing... the RAS was returned to the store and they were told by the service center that it was NOT repairable. The girl didn't know anything beyond that, other than that the customer had been called to pick it up.

                            On a personal note, I must tell you that I get a bit upset when I see a tool in the condition that this RAS was in. It was absolutely filthy! I don't think the poor thing had ever seen a vacuum hose or dust brush, as it was absolutely caked with sawdust. I was a bit surprised that at least some of it hadn't fallen off in the transport in and out of the store.

                            It wasn't in any kind of container, and it just sat there on the floor... so I have no idea how it went in or out to a service center. I do know that it wasn't there a couple of days ago though.

                            In addition, the table (apparently the original) was all cut up, as was the fence and back-up support table. I guess the guy never heard of putting a working cover on the thing. The fence of course one expects to be a bit hacked up, as that's a zero-cost replacement... but that fence looked like it had never been replaced... ever!

                            In any case, it's sort of RIP for this particular saw as I doubt that the owner will care enough to investigate it further. Too bad I think, but it's also a shame that a tool that is probably only seven to ten years old cannot be repaired and/or parts cannot be supplied for it.

                            CWS

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