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Motor pullet out of round. Shakin

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  • Motor pullet out of round. Shakin

    Bandsaw motor pulley is about a 1/16th out of round causing a balance problem wich shakes the bealt and I believe transfers to the saw.
    I think thats where some of my vibration is coming from. Also the saw pulley is of a few thousanths guessing maybe 5 havnt really checked it. Replacing the motor pulley should eleviate most of the shake shouldn't it?

  • #2
    Its a ridgid just set it up a couple days ago.
    Maybe if I whine to emerson theyll send a new pulley for the motor.Its so far of you can see the id hole is not centered as for the saw pulley not sure if 2-5 thousanths would make a big differance. Or would it?

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    • #3
      Thanks for the help. Have used bandsaws at work but first time I set one up.
      Motor pully is actually 28 thousanths out measured in the groove and 34 on the outside rim.
      The saw pulley is 4.5 out of round groove and outside rim.

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      • #4
        shaft is good no vibration or wobble when pulley is off.
        My concern was what it would do to my bearings using pulleys that werent balanced well.
        Having heard the horror stories would you get these pullies elsewhere?
        And if so where? I've heard of pulley upgrades b4 wich leaves me to believe that the tolerances arnt what they should be for many saws.

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        • #5
          The Ridgid Band Saw is in need of major overhauling, and upgrading. It's a very compatable saw, it just needs to be manufactured correctly!
          John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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          • #6
            Am I missing something guys? If It is a "Ridgid", just call them, it has a lietime warranty doesn't it?
            Changeling

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            • #7
              I've got a dealer thats just minuites awayu that said itd be two weeks for the part and all I need to take him is the pulley and my receipt.
              Just didnt want to wait two weeks.
              I found one but its a 3" instead of a 2-1/2.
              That'll boost my speed up to 3163.
              Will that pose a problem?

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              • #8
                Changeling,

                Ridgid no longer handles warranty parts. They have auctioned off all thier stock of parts. The new manufacture is not caught up with demand in the parts department. There is a considerable wait to get replacement parts. Over time, it should improve. A stock should have been built up before the change over to continue the the reputation Ridgid had built. Somehow, that part of the change didn't go well. Those needing parts are caught in the evolution of the change, and the wait.
                John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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                • #9
                  UO-Woody do you think the gain in speed will hurt anything? What about smaller blades?

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                  • #10
                    A smaller blade doesn't change speed. the speed is only determined by the motor pulleys and other pulley on teh saw as well as the 14" wheels. to change the speed, you'd either need to change the pulleys, or change the diameter of the wheels.

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                    • #11
                      Pay attention mike. Read post.

                      He mentioned that he was changing pulley speed with replacement part.

                      I don't think the change in speed will have any adverse affects. Unless you're trying to cut metal, but that needs far less than 3,000 rpm. Table saws vary from brand to brand by as much as 1,000 RPM.

                      Jake

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                      • #12
                        Thanks guys

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                        • #13
                          I couple hundred feet per minute on the blade can make a dramatic impact, depending on the type of wood and application. Since it's a single speed to begin with, they averaged out the best speed to try and meet every wood and application.

                          Affects on the wood itself isn't the only concern. Increasing speed on the blade excessivly can cause accelerated ware, as well as on bearings and guides. Increasing speed is increasing friction, and heat. To be safe, I would rather go slower and pick up the torque. But I resaw often, and cut thick stock. If your doing mostly thin stock and curves, it shouldn't be so much of an impact.
                          John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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