Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Thermal Transfer Receipts Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I have been following this receipt thread for a couple of weeks. A day or two ago, I looked at the receipt from Home Cheapo for my lawnmower, bought in 2000.

    Yup, you guessed it: perfectly clear, like the day it was issued! No problem whatsoever.

    Perfect, mint, like new, uncirculated. legible, virgin, fantastic.

    Not a copy, not laminated, not an image made with Silly Putty. The original HD receipt.

    Enough!

    Comment


    • #17
      DON'T go to Kinko's they have heat laminating and
      it will turn your receipt black and will not be able to read it.

      Comment


      • #18
        I am very familiar with thermal printing and can help clarify somethings that have been discussed.

        The receipts that fade out are not printed with Thermal Transfer technology. If they were, they would not fade. Thermal Transfer technology involves actually transferring ink from a ribbon onto the paper and it creates a fairly permanent image.

        The receipts that most retailers issue are printed using Direct Thermal technology, which involves a paper that is treated with heat sensitive chemicals. This paper is also light sensitive and will quickly turn black in direct sunlight. But most important the chemicals are unstable over time. That means the image will likely fade out after a few years regardless of whether you laminate it or not.

        A simple solution would be for HD to make a photocopy for you at the time of purchase and apply some sort of stamp and/or signature directly to the copy. You might ask them to do so on the next purchase and see what happens.

        RobH

        Comment


        • #19
          mark the invoice and xerox and staple the original to it.

          Michael

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Jonny:
            I have been following this receipt thread for a couple of weeks. A day or two ago, I looked at the receipt from Home Cheapo for my lawnmower, bought in 2000.

            Yup, you guessed it: perfectly clear, like the day it was issued! No problem whatsoever.

            Perfect, mint, like new, uncirculated. legible, virgin, fantastic.

            Not a copy, not laminated, not an image made with Silly Putty. The original HD receipt.

            Enough!
            IMHO - whether it does-doesn't a copy (legible) is all they want and need.Makes sense anyway - anything needed for warranty should be in multiples. Period. Watch-ring-mower-tax form-everything of value. Lost everything once in fire - I learned. Copy home-one elsewhere.

            Agree-enough!

            Comment


            • #21
              Johny,

              The reason you are probably not seeing any fade is because the thermal printer technology is a fairly new machine technology on credit card processing terminals. They started coming out about 2 years ago b/c they old machines had too many moving parts that can break. I have a friend in the credit card business. Your receipt was probably printed from an older credit card machine.

              Jake

              Comment


              • #22
                Thanks RobH for clarification of terminology.

                Thermal transfer is more like lazer copiers?

                Direct Thermal printing is what the recepts are.
                John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

                Comment


                • #23
                  Okay already - Fear Factor Version 2 I guess

                  So get a copy from CS, have them do it, they will, have a MGR do a signature if it makes one sleep better.

                  FYI - IRS deals with this already. Copies are way of life there too.

                  Can we just say now this is resolved?????

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Resolved? I'd just add, if enough people speak up about this, maybe we can get it changed.

                    First, Jake, if you're talking about "direct" thermal transfer----it's actually quite old, relatively speaking----remember thermal faxes? If you wanted to keep them, you had to photo copy them.

                    Anyway, and this isn't just HD,----the receipt is important on any item you purchase, but particularly on durible goods, with any sort of warranty---then, there's IRS requirements for business expenses, etc. Just think the entire practice should be changed.
                    Dave

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Not a soul will argue ti should ALL be changed but let's get serious too. It won't - in the name of cost(s) and effientcy (sp).everyone elses' that is but consumer.

                      They view it as "ain't broke" - "it works" - "it's here" - "it stays"

                      So we are ones who work around this fact. Copies and original.

                      And it really isn't that big a deal. 4-6-8 recipts per copy page, file a copy, be done with it. It be only as big a deal as we make of it.

                      Hassle - sure. What isn't? But if we willing to keep only the original receipt of anything we playing with fire. A real fire in home - you my man are the one screwed.

                      Can anyone end this endless thread????

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Ok. Heres what you do:

                        Store the receipts in a folder in you refrigerator. But not in the crisper drawer. They'll smell like bell peppers too quickly. I'd put them in a ziplock bag and keep them in the meet drawer next to the low fat turkey keilbasa that will never be touched.
                        keep makn\' sawdust!...just don\'t breath any.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Don't forget the vacuum sealer off the infomercial. Vacuum pack before ya put in the fridge



                          Jake

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            problem with refidgerating them is when you take them out, they will have condinsation. Back to the moister destroys them issue.

                            I gotta laugh. They all have us by the ...... They will only accept the origanal receipt posted by the moderator. So unless the machine goes bad before the receipt...you bought another dispossable machine.

                            I sure feel like I'm hangin by my ..... on this one!

                            [ 01-20-2004, 03:15 PM: Message edited by: Norm ]
                            John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              It sure looks like an uphill battle, but I don't think that they have us completely by the balls. We've got a few things in our favor:

                              1. HD receipts have a barcode on them which, when read by their scanner, allows them to call up the original receipt in their computers. They can thus easily verify that a Xerox copy is an unaltered, accurate copy of the original. And, they can just punch in the numbers below the barcode if the scanner can't read a copy, but I think it probably can read it.

                              2. There are Federal laws that govern this stuff. Like the (if memory serves) Magnusson-Moss Warranty Act, and others. If someone gets mad enough, they can haul HD or Ridgid into Federal Court over the matter. Yes, it will cost a bundle up front, but the court may allow the plaintiff (the guy who is doing the suing, like one of us) to recover his attorney's costs and court costs from HD or Ridgid. If the HD/Ridgid clowns put a policy in place that says they will honor the lifetime warranty ONLY when the claim is accompanied by the original receipt, no copies allowed, and they issue receipts that are known to be unstable and that become unreadable with age, then they have acted in what the courts call "Bad Faith." Combine that with the above mentioned Federal laws that require companies to honor warranties, and I think we'd "prevail" as the lawyers say. Could even become a class-action suit if a good lawyer got hold of it.

                              One other point: I think someone has posted somewhere here that some HDs do not require the original receipt for warranty claims on the Ridgid lifetime warranty. If so, then it may not be a HD corporate policy to require originals, and a couple of polite, but serious and complaining letters to HD corporate offices might get them to issue orders to the stores to accept copies (see above about how they can verify receipts).

                              Heck, maybe we should start writing letters to HD and Ridgid about our complaints. If politely and clearly written they usually get attention. When executives begin getting as much mail as they would get from the guys on this forum alone, they will sit up and take good notice. Even lousy execs. will recognize the potential threat to their "bottom line" if too many people start complaining.

                              If you decide to write to them, write to the CEO or President.

                              Since what you will be writing is rhetoric, also known as argumentative and persuasive writing, keep a few basic rules of that style of writing in mind: First, know your audience. Easy enough, you are writing to a busy executive that, among other things, is interested in protecting his company's income (and reputation which effects income). There may be several layers of lower executives and management between him and you, so he might actually be sympathetic to your/our problems, and it may be the managers in between that are causing the problem. Give the guy a chance to be a good guy.

                              Second, choose your personna. In other words, decide on what personality you want your letter to show the guy. Do you want to be a thermonuclear blast that leaves him with his hair blown backward, his face charred, and his glasses melted? Looks funny in cartoons, but rarely works getting what we want in real life. On the other hand, don't go overboard and be too pitiful. You don't want him to feel like you sent an Italian Gypsy playing sad violin music while your plump Italian mother clings to his leg crying, dabbing her tears with her hanky and howling about the crappy deal you got on your Ridgid power tool. Present your self as a rational, and polite customer who has encountered a problem that no one else has been able to resolve.

                              Third, state your case clearly and fairly. Be exact, be honest.

                              Finally, write REAL letters, on paper and delivered by the US Postal Service. Do not use email. Real letters get their attention better. I'd even suggest that you DO NOT put your email address in for them to reply to.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Thank you kindly Scott for that very good information. I think me ..... are swinging freely again! Though slightly stretched.

                                [ 01-20-2004, 03:15 PM: Message edited by: Norm ]
                                John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X