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  • #31
    Re: Ridgid R4512 Table Saw: Unpacking and Assembly

    Somewhere in this thread I saw a question about how the Vac attaches to the dust chute. Here's a photo of how I did mine.

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    • #32
      Re: Ridgid R4512 Table Saw: Unpacking and Assembly

      Hi Steve sorry i did not see your question posted to me on 6/03, i don't monitor this thread with any regularity.

      Sounds like you have the problem solved and I don't know if I could have been of much help on this subject anyway,
      not ever having owned a 4512 myself. But since the fence is of similar design maybe. Sounds like Finer999 gave you some good advice. How did you make out with adjusting the tension on the fence lock?

      I seem to remember mine seemed tight and I don't know if I did anything to resolve it or it just 'wore in" so to speak over time.
      Last edited by Bob D.; 06-24-2011, 06:12 PM.
      ---------------
      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
      ---------------
      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
      ---------
      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
      ---------
      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

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      • #33
        Re: Ridgid R4512 Table Saw: Unpacking and Assembly

        I picked mine up yesterday. All i can say is waht a saw. My old saw was a porter cable job site. Its has served it perpose and is a good saw for what it was designed for. After several months of using and learning from it. It was time for an upgrade. What a upgrade.
        Assembly was very easy. All the parts are clearly marked and fit perfict. To night I have to set up the saw. Its well worth the money. I cant wate to cut my first peace of wood with it.

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        • #34
          Re: Ridgid R4512 Table Saw: Unpacking and Assembly

          enjoy the saw. just be sure to align the blade and fence to the same miter slot so rips are consistent along the length of the workpiece. this also reduces the chance of kickback occurring.
          there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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          • #35
            Re: Ridgid R4512 Table Saw: Unpacking and Assembly

            I got my saw last Friday. Assembly was easy, and they include the hex wrenches(I didnt realize this until the saw was built). Took about 2 hours. First cutting project was a mdf extension table for the right side and Im going to make a router plate to go there. Probably going to convert it to 220 also. I love the caster setup it moves easily and when I set the saw down its not moving. I wish you could line up the fence(left and right dialing in referencing the blade) with 2 set screws like on the delta fences. On this one you have to loosen 4 screws then adjust, not as easy to dial in.

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            • #36
              Re: Ridgid R4512 Table Saw: Unpacking and Assembly

              As for the blades, I have a 30 tooth Freud Glue Line rip blade and a 40 Tooth Freud Premier Fusion combination Blade. I use the combo blade for plywood and crosscutting. The rip blade is dedicated just for ripping. They are $100 per blade, but well worth the money. If I had to choose just one, I'd go with the Glue Line rip blade. These blades are awesome and I highly recommend them. I am a weekend warrior too, but spending the extra money on good blades has been worth it to me.

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              • #37
                Re: Ridgid R4512 Table Saw: Unpacking and Assembly

                I have this saw, only the older one. Purchased roughly 5 years ago it is a decent hard working saw. My issue is I have purchased some very thick solid oak 4X4's and its a challenge for the saw to chew through it. I've decided to convert to 220 volt and have the amperage dropped to save the motor. My buddy is a journeyman electrician but he's so busy I'm on my own. I kind of know what is required but a spec sheet would be best. Any help here? Thanks, Seanster.

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                • #38
                  Re: Ridgid R4512 Table Saw: Unpacking and Assembly

                  Originally posted by Brownie View Post
                  As for the blades, I have a 30 tooth Freud Glue Line rip blade and a 40 Tooth Freud Premier Fusion combination Blade. I use the combo blade for plywood and crosscutting. The rip blade is dedicated just for ripping. They are $100 per blade, but well worth the money. If I had to choose just one, I'd go with the Glue Line rip blade. These blades are awesome and I highly recommend them. I am a weekend warrior too, but spending the extra money on good blades has been worth it to me.
                  I have fought this for years....buying the high end blade for a superior cut line. I know it would save me time on sanding and joining, but I'm cheap. Guess I need to buck up, but $100. PER??? Yikes dude.

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                  • #39
                    Re: Ridgid R4512 Table Saw: Unpacking and Assembly

                    Originally posted by seanster View Post
                    I have this saw, only the older one. Purchased roughly 5 years ago it is a decent hard working saw. My issue is I have purchased some very thick solid oak 4X4's and its a challenge for the saw to chew through it. I've decided to convert to 220 volt and have the amperage dropped to save the motor. My buddy is a journeyman electrician but he's so busy I'm on my own. I kind of know what is required but a spec sheet would be best. Any help here? Thanks, Seanster.
                    Sir,

                    I can offer you the Sears manual for this same saw. I know it says Sears, but the saws are virtually identical. If you'd like to have it, send me a PM via this forum and include your e-mail address. I can then send it to you directly.

                    I tried to attach it here but the forum says the file is too large. It is in PDF format.

                    Umpire.20

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                    • #40
                      Re: Ridgid R4512 Table Saw: Unpacking and Assembly

                      I find table saws to be dangerous and less forgiving. However, cannot do without it especially with straight cuts. When the need is inevitable, remember safety.

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                      • #41
                        Re: Ridgid R4512 Table Saw: Unpacking and Assembly

                        Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
                        Personally, I like the Ridgid titanium-coated blades. I'm using the 50-tooth combination on both my CMS and my radial arm saw, and in both cases the crosscut is quite smooth. Much of course, depends on the feed rate. In both cases, the blades have seen about two years service and are still performing great.

                        On black Friday, Home Depot had this blade on sale for $30, normally they are $40. I picked one up and installed it on my Ryobi BT3100-1. Very smooth rips and I'm quite pleased. That saw spins at around 4800 rpm, and with the new 50T combination, it works very nice.

                        On the subject of the 4512, I was in Home Depot a couple of days ago and got a much closer look at it. The new wheel/lift assembly appears to be better able to handle the saw, then did the conventional Herc-U-Lift on the granite-top 4511. Perhaps that is because the saw is a bit lighter, but still, I like the design of the lift better.

                        I do like the fence, it's a three-point aluminum, very much like the one on my BT3100. On the latter, the fence is always locked down perfectly and over the years, I've never had a problem with it. The extruded T-slots in the fence make it ideal for jigs and sacrificial add-ons. And the 3-point T-square-like assembly securely locks fore and aft.

                        I'm not so sure about the two-piece rail assembly though. Something about that joint/seam right there, almost in front of the blade, doesn't seem right to me. I would have loved to see a single piece rail, separately boxed/tubed; but, I do imagine handling during shipment and possible loss had some bearing on the final determination by manufacturing.

                        The two stamped tables (wings), are sort of a negative I think and I really am not impressed with that support rod that goes between the front and real rails on the right hand side of the machine. That just strikes me as something to grab hold of, or hang something on and possibly leverage the rails into bending. I suppose the purpose is to keep the rails from being bent, but I would be concerned.

                        The stamped-steel tables one could probably live with, only time will tell. But on the display unit, I could already see that there's a problem. On this particular 4512, the right-side table is too high and the fence hits it. too the point where you have to lift the fence at the front in order to get it to pass over the table. I suspect that the table is somehow adjustable, but it appeared to be solidly bolted to the rails and I didn't see any release of any kind. So, you probably have to loosen the bolts and hopefully the mountinig holes are slots, to allow for some "adjustment".

                        But as it sat there, you could already see where movement of the fence was abrading the top front edge of this table and the paint was showing significant wear. Definitely NOT right!

                        Other than that, I'd say the price is certainly right. But I do think I'd have to take a much closer look at the lift and tilt mechanism and of course the motor and drive. Keep posting those pictures.

                        My little Ryobi BT-3100-1 isn't made with quite the same "oomph" that this beast has and so from that point of view there's nothing to compare. But with my other features, I think I need to wait awhile before I jump on a bigger saw. Still, it's always an ambition to see these new offerings from Ridgid and maybe hope that it might be a good reason to upgrade.

                        CWS

                        Don't ever judge the quality of a tool setting on the floor of a big box store most of the time they are assembled by a person that couldn't find their butt with both hands, let alone read assembly instructions & follow them. Remember everybody learns differently & some can't read & follow instructions & don't care to. I've seen many many floor model tools improperly assembled in big box stores. Also mistreated with junk piled on them.
                        Last edited by VLL; 09-28-2013, 08:44 PM.

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                        • #42
                          Re: Ridgid R4512 Table Saw: Unpacking and Assembly

                          OK. I own the R4512 for a little over two years now. I must comment about the tables (wings) showing wear. The store folks don't align them as they should. If you align your table & extensions you'll have no problem. The bigger problem with the 4512 is the 2-piece front rail. Each time you pass over the junction, you will "jump" a bit. This jump didn't affect my cuts in the least. I have added a Vega Pro 40 fence & rail system to my saw. This allows a much wider/longer rip to the right of the blade. If I had it to do again, I would add a bissmeyer (sp) system rather than the Vega. Simply because it has better attachments to the front & rear of the saw.

                          All this being said ......... I would absolutely buy the 4512 again and I would highly recommend it to others.

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