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  • TS2400 - making router mount for the wing...

    I wanted to replace the aluminum "wing" that can slide out with a thicker (1.125") and wider (10-12")piece of MDF to occasionally use as a router table.

    Having a removable plate for my Router, I could also put a solid plate in place when I plan on using it strictly as a table saw.

    Any holes in this idea? Has it been done before on the Ridgids? Especially the TS2400?

    TIA,

    Bubba.

  • #2
    Bubba Blue,
    I found this table saw mounted router extension while browsing the Sears tool catalog... Don't really know much about it. But thought I would shoot you a link to take a gander at. Here is the Sears Craftsman part number (25351) to enter on their Search - keyword or item # box. This will show you a picture and specs. Might be adaptable to your saw... www.craftsman.com
    Regards,<br /><br />Big Johnson<br /><br />Pictures: <a href=\"http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php</a>

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    • #3
      Thanks for the thought Big Johnson.

      I've seen this design. The general consensus seems to be that as you route, any wood chips that fly can get caught in those wonderful looking crevices that they've so conveniently cut into the top! They in turn will mar your work piece!!

      But, seeing that is what originally got me thinking about doing the same thing on my TS-2400. It would be on the opposite side which would be easier to remove and replace with the saw however.

      I was also planing to make it with a miter slot so I can use the table saw's Miter Guage.

      Bubba.

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      • #4
        Hi Bubba

        I have an Icra Ultra jig and TS fence on my TS 2424 and also wanted to use the right side of my TS as a router table so that the Incra Ultra jig could be used for double duty. That is, as a table saw jig plus fence and a router jig. I died add the Incra Wonder fence (split fence). My solution was to build a support table (oak frame and MDF covered with formica) to accomodate the full capacity of my Incra TS (31"). I made the width 29" which leaves 1/4" between my Incra fence. Instead of building a regular router table with a 9"x12" insert, I decided to use the Veritas Steel table as a huge 24x16 insert. All I had to do was ensure the Formica was level with the steel top. Check the Lee Valley (Veritas)link here to see the advantages of this table. Be sure to click on the router table top to see the advantages of the steel 3/16" thick top that is guarnteed not to sag. An additional advantage is that, once installed, it only takes a minute to remove the router (DW 625 in my case), use it for hand (plunge) operations then reuturn it to your table. The patented clamps will hold most routers (check). The advantage is, once you set it up initially (about 10 minutes for me), you can remove and reinstall it in less than a minute and it will remain perfectly centered because you don't mess with the setup clamps. There are some quick release clamps on the patented unit that permit removing the router without changing the setup.

        Another advantage is that I can use my Grip-Tite magnetic featherboards for both the table saw and router operations because the top is steel. Look into these, they are great, IMO. I supported the oak frame with support arms mounted directly to the table saw frame at a 45 degree angle similar to router table supports found at Woodhaven. This allows me to move my table saw around the shop or even outside without dragging support legs around. I found it was easier to make my own support legs so they would fit perfectly but to each his own.

        Keep in mind, there are many solutions. The above is just mine and I'm more than pleased with it. Works perfectly. I also use the Veritas lifter which is inexpensive and I personally think works better than those costing 4 times as much. No need to turn a crank 100 revolutions to move the bit. Simply step on a pedal to get it close than use the fine tune knob to get it perfect. There is no necessity for a lifter, however, as I can still tilt the table up 45 degrees to gain direct access to the router. Plans are included for a support arm to hold the table tilted while changing bits or removing the router. Worth checking into, IMO.

        Best of luck in whatever you decide.

        Cheers

        Art

        [ 12-31-2001: Message edited by: Art ]

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        • #5
          Thanks Art. I appreciate the info. Unfortunately that's too big for the TS2400.

          Does look nice for a dedicated table though. It will fit on the mobile stands/tables I'm making for myself... how heavy is the plate?

          Bubba

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          • #6
            Bubba, I hate to rain on your parade, but tring to fit a router table in a 2400 is kind of like putting a trailer hitch on a VW beetle. In other words, not a real good base to start from.

            Most router table/extension wing type stuff is designed for typical contractor or cab saw dimensions (27" depth etc.). I'm not going to say what you're wanting to do is impossible, but I don't think you're going to find much help out there from people who have done this on a benchtop type saw. Some people have built wheeled platforms to mount benchtop saws and adorned them with infeed, outfeed, side extensions etc. That's O.K., but now you have created a monster with as big a footprint as a contractor saw. Most people get benchtops for portability, so now you have defeated the purpose of the saw in the first place.

            I think if your efforts were directed to building a mini router table (check the benchtop version at Rockler) you would be ahead in the long run. Heck, you can make a router table by hanging a router on a board over two saw horses.

            Keep plugging. Maybe you will come up with a way. [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img]
            Dick

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            • #7
              Hergy,

              Actually, I'm learning a lot from everyone. I'll be using alot of existing ideas on this. All I'm doing is scaling down the table size for the router. Most plates are 9x12 anyway which will fit within my design.

              Here's what I've come up with so far. I plan on replacing the sliding surface of the TS2400 with a wider piece (16x21 vs the current 6x21 piece). Sizes are pretty much to scale in the image link below.

              To view it however, you'll need to copy and past it in your browser and remove the "http://" part before hitting return to view it... (darned geocities)
              http://www.geocities.com/ca_woodworker/tsrouter.jpg

              [ 01-01-2002: Message edited by: Bubba Blue ]

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              • #8
                Bubba,
                I've been following your posts. I have a TS2400 also. Check out mlcswoodworking.com item #9338. Phenolic insert may fit in the opening between the table and wing with a little injuneering. Another item (#9168) of interest is an above the table router raiser could be incorporated into the wing to make quite a neat set up, if you have $40 plus $90 bucks to spare.

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