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  • Blade stiffeners?

    As a table saw "newbie" I am soaking up this forum like a dry sponge.

    I have heard but a few references to blade stiffeners. Are they worth the time and money? What is a good kind, if they are.

    So far, I am quite pleased with the "standard", as delivered blade. I guess I am not alone although I was told a "All Purpose CMT blade would make me drool. I am wondering if a blade stiffener would improve all blades.

    Off topic, but about my TS3612, a pal came over to help me fine tune things with his dial indicator and he said I had my table extensions upside down. I wasn't sure how he determined that, but we swapped them, right side up. I didn't think the instructions were really clear here. I had them with the smoother, enameled, part of the honeycomb side up. He said the proper way was the fully machined side up. When I made some cuts today, (pretty rough redwood), it seemed to "drag" on the "honeycomb." My pal suggested that I carefully take "crocus" cloth and go over the edges of the castings and barely round them over. The side that is up is absolutely true, both back and front on both side extensions. I haven't waxed anything yet as my buddy said there is something called "dry coat" that sells at some of the trade shows that is the bananas.

    Any suggestions. Thanks in advance.

    Tommy [img]smile.gif[/img]

  • #2
    there worth the money.I use top coat. welcome to the fourm

    [ 03-18-2003, 07:34 PM: Message edited by: Andy B. ]
    Andy B.

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    • #3
      I also use and recommend TopCote. The cheapest place I've found to buy it is through Lee Valley using PN 56Z44.30, $9.95 for a 10.75oz can. Usual affiliation disclaimer.
      ================================================== ====
      ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

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      • #4
        Thanks for the top cote information and the blade stiffener recommendation.

        Tommy

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        • #5
          Tommy,

          Unless you are using a thin kerf blade, the stiffner is not needed. Even then, it's not normally needed. They reduce your depth of cut and unless you're cutting pretty thick hard wood, you would rarely notice any difference.

          There are also 2 different types - one is a stiffner which is a single piece and the other's are stabilizers which are 2 pieces that fit on each side of the blade. The stabilizers change your blade location and require that you recalibrate your fence. I definitely would not go with this type.

          Bob R

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          • #6
            Thanks Bob R. I don't want to give up depth of cut. I find that letting the saw blade do its work by going slow, that my saw doesn't even burp. Of course I don't have Maple, Oak or exotic hardwoods in my inventory yet

            Tommy

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            • #7
              Bob...

              i agree that stiffners are not needed on a standard kerf blade....with one exception. My CMT general on my TS36-12 was burning a bit on miter cuts on harder woods (especially poplar). i bought a set and it solved my problem. As far as losing depth of cut, it is not really an issue. it is a small price to pay for a cleaner cut. how many people actually need to use the blade in its full up position on the table saw? if i have to cut anything that thick i use my miter saw.
              \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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              • #8
                Spacebluesonoma,

                I have not had a problem with burning, but cut most miters on the RAS. My crosscut sled is made from 3/4" plywood and you don't have to be cutting real thick pieces to have the stiffner start rubbing the sled. It's just something that you have to be more aware of.

                I bought a stiffner to try it with the thin kerf blades, but really can't notice a difference. The times that you may actually need it (cutting thick hardwoods), is when you'll notice the reduction of your height capacity. I have a couple of thin kerf blades and a few of the 1/8"'s. The thin kerfs seem to cut just as well (or better) than the 1/8" one with or without the stiffner.

                Bob R

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                • #9
                  Bob R: Thanks for your insight re: blade stiffeners. I have been making lots of saw dsut this past week and the 3612 has been flawless, making accurate repeatable cuts. frankly, I am beginning to wonder how I got by without a table saw all these years.

                  Tommy

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