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New T3 titanium coated saw blades ....

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  • New T3 titanium coated saw blades ....

    Hi folks,
    I just brought home a new Ridgid T3 titanium coated saw blade (50 tooth) to replace the blade that came standard on my TS 2400 portable rable saw. My HD had next to nothing else in stock in that combination rip/crosscut range. At this point in time, my work calls for a general purpose blade. This looks like it is much better quality than stock. I know these saw blades are very new on the scene and I've heard or read precious little about them either way. So before I tear open the package,I figured I'd ask here first. How well do they cut? Would I be better off spending more money on something else? ...Anyone care to share experiences and/or opinions?
    Thanks, Craig

  • #2
    Craig

    Rumor has it that Freud manufactures the new Ridgid blades with the difference being the titanium coating versus the Perma-shield coating on the Freud brand name blades. If you look close you will notice that features such as the Laser-cut anti-vibration slots are identical on both. You could peruse this site to locate the comparable Freud blade and then perhaps search Amazon to compare prices but to answer the question did you purchase a quality blade? In my opinion without any experience with the new Ridgid blades, but owning a couple of Freud blades, I would say yes.

    http://freud.dev.multi-ad.com/woodwo..._Series_1.html

    Woodslayer

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    • #3
      I've also heard rumor that these blades are made by Freud, and most comments I've read have been positive.

      Keep in mind that Freud makes at least 4 different consumer series of blades....Diablo contractor series, the "Avanti" series, the "L" series, and the premium "F" series. I have no idea which, if any, of these series the Ridgid blades most resemble. The teeth don't appear to be quite as large as those that were on my LM72 and LU84.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by hewood:
        ..........The teeth don't appear to be quite as large as those that were on my LM72 and LU84.
        They not only appear not to be as large, they aren't if you mean wide when you say large. The main reason for that is that both the LM72 and LU84 are full kerf blades and the Ridgids' are thin kerf blades.

        [ 08-12-2005, 11:06 AM: Message edited by: BadgerDave ]
        I decided to change calling the bathroom the "John" and renamed it the "Jim". I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BadgerDave:
          </font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by hewood:
          ..........The teeth don't appear to be quite as large as those that were on my LM72 and LU84.
          They not only appear not to be as large, they aren't if you mean wide when you say large. The main reason for that is that both the LM72 and LU84 are full kerf blades and the Ridgids' are thin kerf blades. </font>[/QUOTE]No, I meant they don't look as large front to back and vertically, making me think they're modeled more after the Avanti or old "TK" series, but I really don't know.

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          • #6
            Craig,
            I'm interested in these blades as well, also for a TS2400 saw.

            I happen to use the splitter that came with the saw, so I have a problem with the thin-kerf designs I have so far seen.

            Keep in mind, the TS2400 splitter is about 0.080" as measured with a caliper.

            If you are using your stock splitter, like me, check the kerf of the blade before you buy it! Most of the thin-kerf blades I've seen range from 0.058" to about 0.090" so some will not work with the stock splitter.

            It appears that some of the thin-kerf designers assume you're not using a splitter!

            [ 08-18-2005, 02:08 PM: Message edited by: MSchenker ]

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            • #7
              Craig

              The October issue of Workbench has an article on Titanium coated products and they tested all the Ridgid blades. It was just a couple of paragraphs on the blades but they seem to have a favorable opinion of the blades in general and they were especially impressed with the results obtained with the finish blades after testing them on various materials.

              Woodslayer

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              • #8
                I build a lot of kitchen wood items, where I cut extremely thin slices, down to 1/32". I usually joint one edge, then I run that straightened edge along the fence of my bandsaw to make the slices. But with this new crop of high-quality rip blades, I wonder if I could get better slices by running it on the table saw instead. Of course, on the table saw, I would have to run wider pieces and probably have to use the offcuts. Or I'm wondering whether it might work to use a jointer sled on the table saw. These new blades open up all kinds of possibilities.

                For me, it's a toss-up between the Ridgid R1090C and the Freud Freud LM74R010 Triple Chip Glue Line Rip.

                Here's a couple of vital stats:
                Ridgid R1090C kerf = 0.090
                Ridgid R1090C teeth = 90
                Ridgid R1090C = $65 at Home Depot

                Freud LM74R010 kerf = 0.126
                Freud LM74R010 teeth = 30
                Freud LM74R010 = $54 at Amazon

                The narrower kerf of the Ridgid is appealing. Both companies claim that their blades produce glue-ready edges. There's a big difference in the number of teeth, which I wonder about.

                [ 08-22-2005, 09:35 AM: Message edited by: MSchenker ]

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                • #9
                  Two completely different blades here....the 90T should leave a much cleaner surface, but will rip alot slower, will risk burning more on rips, and won't do well with thicker stock. The 30T will cut thick stock better, will cut faster, but won't be as clean...whether or not the cuts will be ready for glue ups is kind of subject, but should be fine on most rips. Many blades are capable of glue line rips even if they don't market the blade as a glue line.

                  Best to decide what you want the blade to do primarily, research the tooth configuration and it's strengths, then buy a good brand and good deal that fits the bill.

                  If you're looking for a general purpose blade, consider a combo or a good all purpose 40T like the Forrest WWII, Freud F410, Tenryu Gold, Ridge Carbide, Everlast, etc (~ $65-$120).....don't know if any of the Ridgid blades fit this description.

                  A rep from Freud (Charles M) frequents some of these boards. (WN, Knots) He's very helpful and knowledgeable. Here'a link to Freud's website that has good information about the best applications for each blade.
                  Freud Tools

                  [ 08-23-2005, 08:44 AM: Message edited by: hewood ]

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                  • #10
                    My priority is a clean cut. Speed of the cut is not really an issue.

                    Another point is that I am using this blade on a bench-top table saw, so probably a thinner kerf is better.

                    I suppose that means the 90-tooth blade would be better. But I have heard terrific things about the Freud "Glue-Line" rip blades.

                    [ 08-23-2005, 11:51 AM: Message edited by: MSchenker ]

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MSchenker:
                      My priority is a clean cut. Speed of the cut is not really an issue.

                      I suppose that means the 90-tooth blade would be better. But I have heard terrific things about the Freud "Glue-Line" rip blades.
                      $30 delivered as of now on Ebay....one of Oldham's best...don't know whether or not it's a TK, but there's still time to ask. Summer time is slow for these blade vendors...there's bargains galore!
                      Oldham 80T w/free stabilizer

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                      • #12
                        What's the reputation on Oldhams? I've never ued them and I'm too cheap, er, frugal to take a blind chance. I've got a project with a considerable amout of 1.5" cherry to cut so I'm thinking that I'm needing a 30 or 40 tooth blade. I have a 3650 so what do you suggest for blade width - reg or TK?
                        Laterm
                        Chiz
                        Later,
                        Chiz
                        https://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/frown.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...es/redface.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...s/rolleyes.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/smile.png

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                        • #13
                          Freud, Irwin, DeWalt, Oldham, Tenryu and many other brand names market several different quality levels. Oldham's inexpensive contractor series isn't very good in my experience, but their top end "Signature" line gets lots of favorable comments. It's important to compare apples to apples when comparing brands. I haven't used that particular blade before. At $30 it looks like a bargain....at $60+, I wouldn't take a chance on it without some good testimonials or an opportunity to try one. There are other great blades currently on Ebay....that Oldham was one example that caught my eye. Here's a pic and link to another that looks like a winner currently @ $15.50...I've been very pleased with my DW series 40 rip blade:

                          As far as full kerf or TK...In theory a TK will have more deflection than a full kerf...the upside is that it requires less power from your saw and will cut faster. With better grade of blades from Freud, Forrest, Leitz and DeWalt, I've never found deflection to be a problem, so TK is my preference with better blades since I have a hybrid with < 2hp motor. With a full 3hp cabinet saw, there's no reason not to go with full kerf.


                          DW3218TK

                          [ 08-27-2005, 07:09 PM: Message edited by: hewood ]

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ironhat:
                            What's the reputation on Oldhams? I've never ued them and I'm too cheap, er, frugal to take a blind chance. I've got a project with a considerable amout of 1.5" cherry to cut so I'm thinking that I'm needing a 30 or 40 tooth blade. I have a 3650 so what do you suggest for blade width - reg or TK?
                            Laterm
                            Chiz
                            Sorry I didn't read your post more thoroughly....for 1.5" thick stock, I think you'll definitely want a 24-30T TK ripping blade. Cherry burns really easily and you won't want any slowing.

                            Irwin Marathon 24T for $7.50 on WN

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