Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Home made coping sled

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Home made coping sled

    Just completed my coping sled for my router table, thought I would share this with you.

    I made the base from 3/8 polycarbonate plastic, the same material for making cd's and bulletproof windows. polycarbonate over other types of plastic is unbeatable for strength combined with light weight and machinable with standard router bits makes this a good choice, but it's the most expensive piece of the project at $23.

    I added 2 5 1/2" horizontal clamps for extra hold down strength, a 3" post front and rear to guide the sled plus I added the sliding material stop to keep the work in perfect alignment too the fence and router bit.

    The sleds fences and stops are made from 3/4 high high pressure melamine with 2 1/4 star knobs that can be adjusted to handle workpieces up to 7 1/4 in width.

    The total cost to make this jig was $40. but worth every penny and produces perfect joints without any hint of end grain of tearout

    Here's the Pictures
    Cheers
    Glen
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: Home made coping sled

    Last 5 Pictures.

    Cheers
    Glen
    Attached Files

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Home made coping sled

      Originally posted by Glen L View Post
      The total cost to make this jig was $40. but worth every penny and produces perfect joints without any hint of end grain of tearout
      just curious, what backs up the workpiece in the 4th pic in the second set of pics to prevent the endgrain tearout? looks like the end of the tenon is out there on it's own resting against the fence. is there somehting that guides the sled or is it "guided" by the workpiece as it moves along the fence?
      there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Home made coping sled

        Originally posted by FINER9998 View Post
        just curious, what backs up the workpiece in the 4th pic in the second set of pics to prevent the endgrain tearout? looks like the end of the tenon is out there on it's own resting against the fence. is there somehting that guides the sled or is it "guided" by the workpiece as it moves along the fence?
        The 4th picture just shows the clamping system, when I do the cut I add a backer board.

        The router bit is set above the sled, so the side of the sled is now the guide that rides along the fence. It's also machined about a 1/4" to clear the bottom cutter.

        Cheers
        Glen

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Home made coping sled

          I think You mean Lexan.Polycarbonate is subject to becoming brittle if is arround cirtain solvents.
          I'd keep My fingers well clear of the bit.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Home made coping sled

            Originally posted by jamesamd View Post
            I think You mean Lexan.Polycarbonate is subject to becoming brittle if is arround cirtain solvents.
            I'd keep My fingers well clear of the bit.
            Lexan is a polycarbonate. You may be confusing polycarbonate with acrylic plastic (Plexiglass)

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Home made coping sled

              Originally posted by jamesamd View Post
              I think You mean Lexan.Polycarbonate is subject to becoming brittle if is arround cirtain solvents.
              I'd keep My fingers well clear of the bit.
              It's Impact Resistant MR10 Lexan polycarbonate plastic that is durable and shatterproof, however It's never near any type of solvant.

              Cheers
              Glen

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Home made coping sled

                Polycarbon is typically used as bowl in Pneumatic systems as water/filter seperators or oilers.
                You will always find them with a perforated METAL housing surrounding them,to contain the explosion when they grenade,from the effects of exposure to solvents,just the vapor is enough over time.
                Xylene,mineral spirits,laquer,tolulene,acetone.........
                I don't have the full list,look it up Your self.And Yes lexan is better than poly but it bends easilily.

                Comment

                Working...
                X