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Emerson Announces New RIDGID Power Tools

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  • #16
    Manufacturing Homelite products is nothing to brag about. If they make their woodworking tools with the same quality as their Homelite junk, I will not touch them. I wore out two Homelite chain saws here on the farm, before I got smart and bought a Stihl. 10 years later it is still going strong.
    People always ask: Who is Bigboss? He is my dad. Even though I am 40 years old, he is without a doubt STILL the big boss.........

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    • #17
      Now I'm confused...(suprise! [img]tongue.gif[/img] )

      Initially, I thought Ridgid would control the specifications for the tools being built. It was pointed out to me that I was wrong and that they were going to license the name only. The new release suggests that they will maintain some control over the products produced:
      "meet the high standards established by Emerson"
      Will they or won't they have control over the tools built with their name?
      Patrick

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      • #18
        Why do ya think John Deere got rid of Homelite - They just pawned some junk off on someone that may be alittle more use to such stuff!! r

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        • #19
          The proof, as they say, will be in the pudding. Can't do much now but wait and speculate. I expect the worst. ( If I am wrong then things will be better than I expected ! )

          [ 07-03-2003, 01:57 PM: Message edited by: douggage ]

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          • #20
            Let me add something to this. Outsourcing manufacturing is nothing new. Companies have been doing it for years and years. 10 years ago I worked at a manufacturing plant that made instrument panels for automobiles. It was an interesting experience to say the least. But the important thing to point out is that in the one facility that I worked in, we made the instrument panels for Buick Century, Dodge Shadow, Cadillac Deville, Chevy Lumina, Olds Cutlass, Ford Taurus, and a host of others. All of the big three car makers were serviced at my plant and each of the three brands had different processes and tolerences set up for it. The engineering was done by the respective car makers, and the plans and specifications were given to us. We still had to build the parts to the car makers' specs. So it is a myth when someone says that because it's made in the same factory, it's the same part. I can assure you that it isn't.

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            • #21
              Sorry, but the point about PM and other brands having only a small selection of tools, kind of went right over my head!

              You aren't the only one, Dave. Sometimes I'm better than others at putting an idea across.

              Powermatic does not have a "small selection of tools". The Powermatic line-up is MUCH larger than the RIDGID woodworking line-up.

              However, very few of them are actually built by "Powermatic". They are built by contract manufacturers. Like RIDGID is now doing.

              Fact is, like RIDGID has done for goodness knows how long. I'll bet you that the Paris, TN plant hasn't made a jointer in 40 years, if ever.

              Does that make my point clearer? I don't see (many) people wringing their hands because Powermatic or Delta tools aren't necessarily built in owned plants. Heck, Jet and Grizzly sustain some sort of reputation despite not actually building anything in an owned plant.

              Dave

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              • #22
                Dave A,

                I'm stuck on this from the first press release:
                "Emerson has developed a program to license the RIDGID brand"

                I'm not concerned with who manufactures the tools(or where). It's whether or not Ridgid actually has a say in the design/specifications. My attitude towards the tools would depend upon that answer. I wouldn't be very enthusiastic if Ryobi had full control. You know... past performance not a guarantee of future results... but it's certainly an indicator
                Patrick

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                • #23
                  Two days off the forum and I miss this release...so all of those who thought it was gonna by Ryobi were right. I know most other companies farm out stuff, but you have to realize this company doesn't make much that any of us are interested in buying. I don't know of many of you that have new Craftsman or Ryobi tools in your shop.

                  Emerson has done this to unload an unprofitable tool line and Ryobi (who'd love to make everyone's tools) has bought the license. Everything made by this company is for the homeowner set...those who do not use their tools very often and do not need heavy duty anything. I for one do not fit into the hobbiest/homeowner group they target, so I'm out on anything new they might make. I've been down the Chinese tool road before and the results weren't favorable.

                  For those of you who are optimistic about this, I wish you the best of luck with the new tools and I hope our fears are unfounded. For those who are dismayed, I'm with ya.
                  Kelly C. Hanna<br /><a href=\"http://www.hannawoodworks.com\" target=\"_blank\">Hanna Woodworks</a>

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                  • #24
                    I came back to this site looking for possible suggestions on miter saws and saw this post. It made me run down to my local Home Depot and pick up a Ridgid. The reason I did this was because I didn't want Ryobi and I felt this might be one of very few chances to get a quality product at a decent price. I guess I'll have to see what the quality of future "Ridgid" products will be. I do know that I won't be buying these new "Ridgid" products for some time, especially if I can get the same thing in the Ryobi name at a better price.

                    BTW, the future Ridgid tools maybe for the hobbiest of which I am (I don't even own a home), but you won't see me buying crap.

                    - Dae

                    I now own two quality Ridgid products, TS3612 and now the MS1250LS

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                    • #25
                      Dae,
                      On the side of the box your ms1250ls came in is the following:
                      "Made in Tiawan under strict Ridgid quality standards".
                      It was out-sourced, lincenced, whatever. But is is a "Quality Ridgid Product".
                      The same is on the side of the box that my TP1300 came in I just bought today.
                      Now, Have to assemble the new TP1300!
                      Rob Johnson
                      Orange,Ca.

                      [ 07-04-2003, 05:57 PM: Message edited by: Backyard Woodworker ]
                      Just tilt your head a little and it will look straight!

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                      • #26
                        Backyard Woodworker,

                        Crap, it say's it's made in Taiwan! I'm going to have to take it back and swap the thing out for the other one they had. When I was there looking at the saws I thought I saw "Made in the USA" on the Ridgid box. Maybe it was a different saw there but I thought it was the same. I just didn't grab that one because it was on the bottom and I grabbed the top box. I wonder if this saw I got has the lifetime warrenty or it's got the 3 years. Thanks for the info Backyard Woodworker.

                        - Dae

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                        • #27
                          Dave A.----reading through---just wasn't clear, at least to me, what you meant----very true point though. But, I think there is a big difference between contracting with a plant in Taiwan, to build a tool for your company, and licensing out a brand name----at least my view of the connotation says there's minimal controls by the licenser----

                          Well, there is more than enough in this to confuse anyone except for insidders at Emerson. I for one won't look at this change as a simple continuation of the Ridgid name-----these new tools will have to earn their strips before I buy anything.
                          Dave

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                          • #28
                            Dae, I wouldn't bother to go back and try and get one that says Made in USA on the box, there aren't any. The majority of the 13 machines in the Ridgid Woodworking line are made in Taiwan or China. Even the venerated 3612 TS was only assembled here in Tennessee, from a large proportion of components that were made in Taiwan. That's why it says: Built in USA.

                            David

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                            • #29
                              David,

                              Thanks for the info. Because it was not built or made in the US, I was thinking about taking it back and getting a DeWalt. Dewalt was being made here on the eastern shore of Maryland but I know they were, may have already, shut the Black and Decker plant down to manufacture in Mexico.

                              Here's what I don't understand. I don't understand how it can be cheaper to manufacture overseas then ship here. I can understand Mexico because of NAFTA, but the Far East? The shipping cost has to be crazy high.

                              There are imports products I prefer over US products but when it come to most things, especially tools, I like "MADE in THE USA."

                              - Dae

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                              • #30
                                Dae,

                                You can't have been looking too closely, but probably 90%+ of what's in your home has been made outside of the USA. Take a look at the labels on your clothes, and everything else for that matter. It is unusual to find something with a Made in USA sticker on it, rather than the other way round!

                                Container shipping costs are low, as are the overall manufacturing costs. The selling prices here, are often lower than what it would cost just to manufacture the product in the USA, hence our entire reliance these days on imported goods.

                                David

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